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August 05, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-05

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-THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

010,

ulu~rt~tV

AT YOUR DOC

THREE TIES

A WEEK

VOL. X. No. 18 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1919 PRICE THREE CE

FRANCE RLR OF
CULTURAL WORLD,
SAYS PROFITHIEME
FIRST SUMMER SCHOOL LECTURE
IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE
SUCCESSFUL
FRANCE AND AMERICA
BOUND BY COMMON AIMS
Three Phases in War Explained;
French Methods of Instruction
Recommended

fTWO MORE VARSITY
RIFLEMEN NEEDED
Tests in markmanship which were
held last Saturday on the rifle range
south of Ann Arbor resulted in an ap-
parent opening on the Varsity rifle
team for two more good aspirants.
From the excelent ability shown, Major
C. E. Wilson, by whom the 10 highest
men will be trained, predicts that
Michigan will rank high among inter-
collegiate teams at the national match
to be held this month at Caldwell,
N. J.
Some 29 men reported for the last
tryout, out of whom eight qualified as
experts. Itis expected that two other
candidates will be located Wednesday
afternoon, and any sharp-shooting ge-
nius is urged to come out at 2:30
,o'clock and report to Prof. J. R.
Hayden, who will be in charge.
The average at Saturday's meet on
the 200 and 500 yard ranges are as
follows: Kaufman (state team),
46.66; Wilson (captain state team),'
46.33; Mason, 46.06; Lowry (state
team), 46; Gilmore, 46; Simpson, 45;
(Continued on Page Four) l

LARGE ATTENDANCE
EXPECTED AT SHOW
Ticket Sellhng Campaign Planned to
Reach Everybody on
Campus
-
SUMMER SPOTLIGHT READY
FOR PRODUCTION THURSDAY
One of the largest crowds ever in
attendance at a Summer session en-
tertainment is expected to be in Hill
auditorium Thursday night for the
Michigan Union's Summer Spotlight.
show. E. Mortimer Shuter, the di-
rector, has put the finishing touches
on the production, and it is all ready
for the footlights.
Having had the benefit of talent
trained in the regular winter shows of
the Michigan Union, Mr., Shuter hasI
been able to produce a show that will
rank with any of those in the winter,

Michigan Has Varsity Tennis Teams
Since 1899; 43 Tournaments Won

RALWAY UNION'S
BALK AT WILSON'S
HIGHER WAGE PlA

Explanation or the causes underly
ing the forming of a bond between th
'French and America people wa:
given yesterday afternoon by Pro
Hugo P. Thieme, in his lecture "La
France et 1'Amerique pendant et apre
la Guerre." He dealt at length witl
the intellectual kinship between the
two nations.
The lecture marked the experiment
by Summer school officials to deter
mine whether talks given in foreign
languages would prove popular, and
the large attendance is taken as a
guarantee that this lecture will be
followed next year by other similar
ones,.
"It is the spirit of France which for
more than four years has animated,
inspired, impelled, and won over
every intelligent, patriotic, sympath.e-
tic, and humane being in the better
part of the world, in the only part
where an intelligent being can live,"
declared Professor Thieme. "This
spirit has inflamed our country and
influenced the hearts of every Ameri-
can man, woman, boy, and girl-both
in France and in our camps-and it
was this spirit which manifested itself
in our country during the war; it
was this spirit which aroused Eng-
land, Italy, and finally America.
"What are the qualities which the
entire world began to admire the mo-
ment it came into contact with France,
her soldiers, her officers, her citizens?
The first thing which our young men
were able to see was the beauty of
France, the beautiful landscape, the
picturesque sights. * * * One finds in
the French soul a love of the earth,
a spirit of solidarity and a religious
sense which together make a com-
pact though shifting mass."
Spirit of Unity
Professor Thieme then proceeded to
explain how the thought of the Lost
Provinces, and of the danger of an-
other such humiliation had created
among the French a spirit of unity and
sacrifice. He continued:
"Imbued with and impelled by this
spirit, by such aims and by such an
ideal, by a tenacious determination,
bythe realization that on her example
and conduct depended the fate not
only of the country, of the race, and
of the entire French nation but of all
the free and liberty-loving world-
knowing this I say that France cour-
ageously raised the standard and the
other nations followed her. That is
not yet all. France has given to all
the Allies the fine example of organi-
zation, of discipline, of study and de-
termined resistance, of almost super-
human courage and heroism, of sacri-
fice of wife, of daughter, of father, of
brother, of all that there is to be sacri-
ficed in this world.
"We have seen all that. France has
seen the effepts of it.
If Germany Were Victorious
"In entering the war we knew final-
ly what France had known from the
beginning, that if Germany were vic-
torious there would no longer exist
spontaneous, free, and individual de-
velopment; to the contrary, life would
be a machine regulated by a mechani-
cal motor, pitiless, implacable, cruel.
It was for us to choose. We made the
choice. It was not altogether a ques-
tion of Alsace and Lorraine, but a
question much more vast-that be-
tween right and might.
(Continued on Page Three)

While tennis has never been con-
sidered as important a sport at Mich-
igan as football, baseball, and track,
the University has been represented
by Varsity tennis "teams for more
than 20 years. Michigan's court
teams have built up a splendid all-
time record from 1899, when the first
dual meet was held with another col-
lege, until the season just past when
Michigan won the Conference cham-
pionships in both singles and doubles.
Counting every dual tournament in
which Michigan has met other col-
lege and university teams, the Mich-
igan players have won 43, lost 20 and
tied 5 tournaments. In addition to
these dual meetings, the Varsity has
made a creditable showing in the
championship tournaments.
In 1893 Michigan won the singles1
and doubles titles in the Northwest-1
ern Intercollegiate tournament. In1
1897 Michigan players were runners
up in both singles and doubles in the
Western Intercollegiate tournament.1
The following year Michigan was
again the runner up in doubles.
UNITERSITY COURT MEN
PLACE IN STATE MEETG

Furious Zephyrs
1Y.
Conduce to Study
r(.11. H.)
It you would like climatic condi-
tions to abet your mental efforts in an
examination do not make the fresh,-
man pray for rain. Instead have him
howl for wind.
This concl'usion is to be derived
from remarks made by Prof. Henry F.
Adams, of the psychology department,
in regard to the affect of climate upon
the mental processes. Cloudy days
beget inaccuracy; pleasant ones pro-
mote mental efficiency. An increas-
ing high wind causes a decrease in
errors. The moral is-do not put
everything off until the rainy day.
Annapolis students when tested for
activity and alertness were found to
be affected very slightly by barometric
pressure, more by humidity and quite
decidedly by temperature. A temper-
ate climate, 50 to 70 degrees Fahren-
heit, is the best promoter of aggres-
iveness. Either great uniformity or
sudden and decided changes in the
atmosphere are detrimental.,
The Habit of the Fewr
A few students have the habit of
studying at night. (Professor Adams
emphasized the word "few.") If you
would attain both speed and accuracy,
however, better study in the morning.1
Physical strength, not mental, reach-
es a zenith late in the afternoon.
High temperature is never condu-
cive to study or attention. "If you
lack mental energy in the summer
then you may arrive at the conclu-
sion that climate has affected your1
weakest spot first," says Professor
Adams. He admits that mental labor
is unpleasant to him just now, while
in winter he loves books and hates
the snow-shovel.t
Questionnaires Circulated
One of his occupations-ii theI
colder months-is that of compilings
mathematical correlations comparing
human traits of character. Question-
naires for character reading have
been circulated in the University for
the last two years and about 1,500 of
them have been turned in. By aid of
corrective tables based on the theorya
of probability he will classify resultss
and attempt to ascertain the relation-n
ship of one trait of character to an-e
other. This will reveal the idiosyn-p
crasies of male and female, showing
why women are intuitive, interested
in personality, while "mere man,"i
working with things-bricks, tools,a
chemicals,-blunderingly chooses hisg
associates for their affability in wine,t
poker, or golf. tt
This interpretation of character bye
one or two strongly defined traits is
a field quite unexplored, althoughb
Karl Pearson, the foremost Englisht
statistician, has done somethingd
along the line, Professor Adams' cor-d
relations will probably result in ao
book.t

which usually fill the auditorium. Noi
only has the talent been exceptional
bit it has worked well, rehearsals hav.
ing been held nightly in the old Union
building.
Ticket Sales Campaign
An energetic ticket selling campaign
is being started, and it is expected to
reach eevrybody on the ,campus. Ar-
rangements have been made, however,
so that if anyone is missed, tickets
may be purchased at the book stores
about the campus, or at the box office.
They cost 50 cents.
The first part of the evening's en-
tertainment will consist of a minstrel
show, with all the functionaries and
equipment demanded by such enter-
tainment. For this number Mr. Shuter
brought new songs and jokes from
New York, where they are being fea-
tured in the summper shows on Broad-
way. Most of this material has not yet
been heard in the West.
Vaudeville Acts
Following the minstrel will come a
collection of vaudevile acts, recruit-
ed from student talent. Among them
will be the team of Emmerman and
Simons, who before the war were two
of the campus's best entertainers. Em-
merman recites and sings, and is
famous for his number ,"That's Why
They Call Me State Street Pete," which
he will sing by request Thursday
night. Simons is a popular composer,
but in addition has done several cam-
pus songs, and wrote also part of the
music for "Fools' Paradise." He will
play accompaniments for Emmerman,
and several solo numbers.
The remainder of the acts planned
are to be of like quality, and will
probably furnish the best entertain-
ment seen in Ann Arbor since last
winter;
It is expected that Ann Arbor, both
city and University, will turn out al-
most en masse for the entertainment,
since there has been nothing of the
kind in the city this summer. No
seats will be reserved.
TOMORROW TO SEE
DOUBLE1S DECISION
Munz and Merkel will play Fisher
and Bassett for the doubles champion-
ship in the final round of the Sum-
mer School tournament tomorow aft-
ernoon. The match will be played on
Ferry field, where a court is being put
in readiness for the deciding battle.
Fisher and Bassett won their way
into the finals by defeating Clippert
and Parsons in the semi-final round
8-6, 7-5. The two teams which meet in
the finals tomorrow have each won
three matches. Seventeen teams were
entered in the tournament.
Fourth round singles matches can
be played by Wednesday night, so that
the semi-finals can be played by Fri-
day.- The singles championship will be
decided either Saturday of this week
or early next week, as the winners of
the semi-finals decide.

WIN FIRST ROUND MATCHES IN
MICHIGAN TITLE TOUR.
' NAMENT
Walter Wesbrook, captain of the
1919 tennis team, and Ira Reindel, for-
mer Michigan star' both won their
first round matches in the state title
tournament in Detroit Monday. G.
Reindel, Jr., who led Michigan's fresh-
man tennis team last spring, was also
among the preliminary round winners.
"Chris" Mack, '16, Varsity tennis
coach, will play his first match today,
weather permitting. Mack won the
western statetitle at GranddRapids
Saturday, in both singles and doubles.
His doubles partner was Dr. W. H.
Thwaites, of Grand Rapids.
Thwaites and Mack defeated Richard
Huyge and Walter Shannon, 6-4, 5-7,
3-6, 6-0, 6-2, the winners coming back
in the fourth setnafterthe match was
apparently lost. Mack defeated Coch-
rane in the singles after disposing of
Nick Bartz, a member of the Michi-
gan Varsity team, in the semi-finals.
Both Merkel and Munz were forced
out of the state tournament singles
in the first round. Fritz Bastian de-
feated Munz, 6-3, 6-3, and Dr. Thwaites
defeated Merkel 6-2, 6-3.
$11,500 REWARD IS OFFERED
FOR LAWLER BOMBERS
Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 4.-Rewards
for the arrest and cpnviction of per-
sons guilty of placing a bomb which
yesterday destroyed the home of Os-
car Lawler, formerly assistant United
States attorney general, tonight total-
ed $11,500.
Mr. and Mrs. Lawler, burned dur-
ing a fire which followed the explo-
sion, still are in a critical condition,
their physician said.
Mrs. Lawler's burns were much less
serious than those suffered by her
husband. She received a fracture of
the left clavicle when her husband
dropped her from a second story win-
dow.
Y. M. C. A. HAS MANY JOBS
FOR SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS
The employment office of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. has a large number
of jobs open to students of the Sum-
mer school. The employment offered
includes both odd jobs and steady
work for the rest of the summer. In-
formation 'may be had by calling at
the employment office at Lane hall be-.
tween 8 and 9, and 11 and 12 o'clock
in the morning.

In 1901, 1903 and 1904 Michigar
won both titles in the Western Inter.
collegiate tournaments. The follow-
ing year second place in the singles
was the best that the Michigan en-
tries could do, and after 1905 further
Conference competition was prevent-
ed by Michigan's withdrawal from the
western association.
In 1918 Michigan returned to her
natural rivals in the West, bt failed
to place in the Conference champion-
ships. In 1919, however, with Wes-
brook and Bartz in the doubles and
Wesbrook in the singles, Michigan
fought her way back to her former
position as champion of the West.
Trip Through East
During the decade that Michigan
was absent from the Conference the
tennis team made an annual trip
through the East. The teams met on
these trips occupy a prominent place
in the Varsity tennis records as but
comparatively few matches have been
played with 'western teams.
Of the western teams met, Chicago,
as in other sports, was the biggest
rival. The two schools have met in
six dual tournaments, Michigan win-
ning four, and Chicago two. Wiscon-
sin is the only Conference school
which has the edge on Michigan in
dual competition, the Madison men
winning the only tournament in which
the two institutions have engaged, in
1918.
Michigan has defeated Ohio State
four times, M. A. C. twice, Minnesota
once, and Northwestern once. In the
East, the competition has been stiffer.
Eastern Records
Cornell has the edge on Michigan
in tennis, having won two tourna-
ments to Michigan's one, while two
were tied. Pennsylvania has won the
only two times the Ann Arbor men
have journeyed to Philadelphia. Yale
has. also won both dual tournaments
played with Michigan, while Johns
Hopkins has won once and tied once
with Michigan.
These are the only teams that have
met Michigan more than once in dual
tournaments that have proved super-
ior to the Wolverine racquet men. The
Navy has been defeated o three oc-
casions, Lafayette has lost two, Hav-
erford two and Georgetown two out
of three meetings. .
Nine Out of Ten
Michigan has won nine out of 10
tournaments with Oberlin, has de-
feated Syracuse in the only year the
two schools have competed on the
courts, and has tied with Kenyon,
Pittsburgh, Union and Wooster.
Dr. A. 0. Lee coached Michigan's
tennis teams for many years. Last
year he was compelled to give up ac-
tive coaching, although he still aided
the Michigan team with his advice.
Christian N. Mack, who was a mem-
ber of the Varsity team in 1915 and
1916, coached the 1919 team.
Mack, Ira Reindel and Walter Wes-
brook are the three most recent stars
n Michigan's tennis teams. All of
these men have won honors in title
tournaments in addition to their col-
legiate competition. Both Reindel
nd Wesbrook have won the Michigan
itle, the former winning this honor
in 1917, and the latter in 1918.
Wesbrook captained the Varsity
team during the past year, winning
very match played.
PROVISIONS MADE FOR LARGER
WOMEN'S ENROLLMENT IN FALL
In spite of the fact that the number
>f women enrolled in the University
or the ensuing year has greatly in-
reased, ample provisions have been
nade through the enlargement of the
fist of approved houses. Although all

hose on the present printed list are
full, including the four all-freshman
houses, new ones are being constantly
added. They will be known as Uni-
rersity houses, rather than as League
Louses, the former designation.

REPRESENTATIVES OF SHOPME
DISAPIROVE OF PRESIDENT'S
PROGRAM
IMMEDIATE INCREASE 0
25 PER CENT DEMANDE
Union Chiefs Say They Will Not B
Able to Control Situation
Much Longer
Washington, Aug. 4.-Officials a
the six big railway shopmen's union
told President Wilson today that the
could not approve of his plan for th
settlement of railway wage problems
and asked the immediate granting a
increases averaging approximately 2
per cent which were demanded las
January.
Declaring that 200,000 shopmen al
ready have walked out on unauthor
ized strike, the union officials said i
there were further delay in granting
the demands the situation would ge
beyond their control.
The union ,leaders on leaving th
president announced that they wer
endeavoring to have all the striker
return to work, so that if a strike be
came necessary it could be called iN
the regular manner.
Hines' Explanation
Director General Hines today ex-
plained to a group of representative
labor leaders that he had asked Presi-
dent Wilson to have congress take u
the question of increased wages be-
cause he believed the railroad ad-
ministration virtually had been short
of the power to increase rates to meel
such advances.
The director general said that pas-
sage of a bill by the senate to restore
to the Interstate Commerce commis-
sion its power to suspend proposed
increases was tantamount to putting
the director general on notice that
congress disapproved of increases ex-
cept by the rate-making body.
Financial Situation
Mr. Hines also explained the finan-
cial situation of the railroad adminis-
tration and invited the railroad menr
to give any suggestions they cared to
have incorporated in the bill which
he plans to present to congress.
Warren S. Stone, grand chief of the
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers,
repeated to Mr. Hines the statements
he made to President Wilson, that
new wage increases would only mean
another cycle of increasing prices.
and that the situation growing out of
the high cost of living could best be
met by a return to normal economic
conditions.
CONSIDERATION OF COLOMBIAN
TREATY DEFERtED ON REQUEST
Washington, Aug. 4.-Consideration
of the Colombian treaty which. the
senate was to have taken up today in
open session, was deferred at the re-
quest of Senator Knox, of Pennsyl-
vania, member of the senate foreign
relations, who stated that it was de-
sired to insure protection for Amer-
ican property rights in Colombia be-
fore ratifying the document.
CROWELL GOING TO SELL
A. E. F. SUPPLIES TO FRANCE
Washington, D. C., Aug. 4.-Asist-
ant Secretary of War Crowell will
sail for France tomorrow to complete
the work of the liquidation commis-
sion, arranging for the sale abroad of
the A. E. F. surplus supplies and
equipment,
Twenty Wooden Ships to be Sold
Washington, Aug. 4.-Authority has
been given for the sale in London o
twenty wooden steamers of the Ship-
ping Board fleet at a price of $300,000

each.

r

I

I

THEfMICHIGAN UNION PRESENTS ITS

Thursday
August.

SUMMER

SPOTLIGHT

Admission

50c

=MINSTREL AND VAUDEVILLE.
PERFORMANCE EXTRAORDINARY

o'Clock

Hill Auditorluiii

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