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August 02, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

' XL16 ler Inc

OFFICIAIL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
)ffice Ilours: Managing Editor-I:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-t:oo to 2:00 o'clock daily except Saturday
Communications not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
verine at the discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
ss the writer incloses postage.
The Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehlbert.......................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 2227-M
J. Ellsworth Robinson..................Business Manager
Phone 2414 or i50o
ser M. Campbell............City Editor Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
>n Marx................Associate Editor I Chas. R. Osius Jr...........Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey..:..........Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell......:......Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr...,..................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E Beretta Robert W.. Taylor
Samuel Lainport
BUSINESS STAFF
. Schneider Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1919
Thornton W. Sargent Jr. - Issue Editor
THE REAL IDEA OF COLLEGE
Flow many in the outside world know university life as it really is?
ie were to get his idea of college alone from stories, or more particu-
y from the motion picture, how near the actual truth would it be?
The moving picture college always has a beautiful campus, through
h beautifully dressed girls walk with faultlessly dressed men -- the
r usually in white trousers, dark coats, and straw hats. A college man's
, in a picture, is beautifully furnished, with pennants from every other
ge around the walls, and quantities of sofa pillows strewn about in
tio carelessness.
The short story college is exactly the same. It is a place full of ro-
ce, where young people come to have a good time, sing their college
s, accompanied by the mandolin - was there ever a college hero in a'
t story who could not play the mandolin? - and who generally enjoy
iselves and have many reminiscences to talk over in their later days.
'here is no doubt that this view of university life is widely held, and
e is equally no doubt that it does a great deal of harm. Parents think
four years of college, such as they see, is a waste of time. It is per-
all right for a rich man's son or daughter, who can afford to have a
time, but for people who have their own way to make in the world,
that as soon as possible, it would not do. They do not understand, nor
ever explained to them in plausible form, that university training will
their children in their life work, that more than anything else it will
them a foundation and background for their future calling.
Why does not some author write of college life as it really is? Why do
the motion picture directors, who are usually so particular as to their
ils, give a picture of the serious, the real side of college? Has a lecture
s, a laboratory, a library scene, or any other scene that shows the stu-
at his work, ever been reproduced on the screen?
rhinking people have come to regard the college-trained student as the
est type of citizen. Fiction writers and play producers can do much to
ter the cause of the university by showing their public the real idea of
ge.-The Michigan Daily.

On the Other Hand-
Why Editors Leave Home
The Wolverine offers for the amuse-
ment (?) of its readers the following
bit of rhetorical brilliancy submitted
by some aspiring literrateur. Which
all leads us to remark that a course
in press-agenting might not be a bad
thing.
FEATURE DE LUXE PROMISED
AT SPOTLIGHT VAUDEVILLE
and-
Return to Local
Rialto
A lollapop of promising palatability
to local consumers of theatrical of-
ferings is the scheduled return to the
Spotlight Vaudeville boards of the
piquant team of and
and have both been
associated with many of the most
zestful concoctions of song and dance
ever served across the footlights of
Ann Arbor, and the slated seconds
cause a salivation of the oral cavity.
left in his University wake a
reputation as one of the most original
librettists of all Union operas, and
since his entry into the field of pro-
fessional song writing has added
numerous popular compositions to his
already brilliant menu. Among the
most recent of his lyrical confections
is "When It's Onion Time in Bermu-
da," which is now being sung by
Nora Bayes, Al Jolson, Henry Lewis,
and Eddie Cantor has prom-
ised to offer this delicacy along with
others of his own craft, and
will weave his sauternertenor among
th~e lyrics. Those who recall
vocalization of "That's Why They
Call Me State Street Pete," joyfully
anticipate the promised revival of'
this syncopated slumgullion, while
those who have never had the oppor-
tunity of lending a wistful ear to__
and in salvo have a melodious
morsel awaiting them.
Ha, Ha;
Mr. and Mrs. William Dold and
laughter Viola were recent guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hildinger.
-Washtenaw Post.
Didja ever
Sit around
And
Hold
A plate in one hand
A teacup in another
A limp sandwich in another
An olive in another
A cigarette in another
A napkin in another
And shake hands
With somebody
With another?
If you did
You're a
Centipede.
Enlistments Now Open in the
French Navy
The French Line steamship Chicago
was held up for 30 hours outside Bor-
deaux because the crew, dissatisfied
with the quality of the wine served
them, refused to continue their work.
The ration of the crew includes one
quart of Bordeaux daily. The boys
must raise an awful howl if their
salad dressing is a little strong or
their toast is burned.
So Have I
Miss Ivah Lemen visited her moth-I
er a few days last wek.

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
TEN-THIRTY
Sermon-Lecture
by
LLOYD C. D)OUG~LAS
Topic:
w NE YUSESOr
ADVERSITY" {

For Your Recreation
We have to offer for your recreation
100 Tennis Rackets
Wright and Ditson's strong line also
the Lee Slotted Throat Racket
All Grades $2.00 to $11.00
Racket Restringing a Specialty
Wahr's University Bookstores

Lv

1 i

r

First

Baptist Church
Huron St., below State
Sunday, 10:30 A. M.
Sermon by
FREDERICK BENTLEY I(LEIR
STUDENT GUILD CLASSES
11:45-12:30

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
SYou will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100,-,;cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

I

ASK US

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

ALL ARE WELCOME

me

A

First Unitarian
Church
Corner Huron and State Sts.
SUNDAY 10:30 A. M.
Sidney S. Robins
Minister
CRITTENDEN TELLS
OF OLD ATHLETICS
Description of the various sports of
the ancient world, acconpanied by
slides illustrating the games, com-
prised the main part of Prof. A. R.
Crittenden's lecture "Ancient Athletic
Sports and Festivals" given yester-
day afternoon in Natural Science
auditorium.
Professor Crittenden told of the
principal events-which were running,
throwing the discus and javelin,
wrestling, and boxing. According to
Professor Crittenden, these sports
were universal at first, almost every
one participating in the athletics.
Professor Crittenden said that the
gaimes later became professional be-
cause of the great rewards and praise
which were received by the winners.
Brawn and might were developed and
the universal training was abandoned.
Time changed things so that the win-
ner was no longer content with the
laurel wreaths which were the prizes
of the first games.
The games and festivals probably
originated as religious rites around
the tombs of heroes, but they soon de-
veloped into universal pastimes, said
Professor Crittenden.
Patronize our advertisers.

Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films

II

GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing :-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping r no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State anti our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS' TO
Two Doors from7 VLY O & (MP ANY -19-North
Hill Auditorium jYNDO.& COMAN University.Avenue

----

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE
FOR
THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

COURTESY VERSUS SPEED
"You have a rather tiresome job, - being pleasant to everybody," said
man to the girl who sits behind the information desk awaiting the long
s that press eagerly toward her for instruction. They are monotonously
inuing .lines.
Her smile was reassuring as she answered, "I'm sure you deserve only
kind of treatment." And to this stray individual she stood as a paragon
ourteous efficiency.
When the modern world is convulsed with the application of energy to
d; when countless statisticians are employed by gigantic corporations
scertain how fast the average man can work without lessening his pro-
ive power; when efficiency is being measured in terms of "how slow"
how fast," what part has courtesy in our civilization?
We, cannot shift our world back to the days of chivalry. Knights-
nt and ladies walk no more, while the doffed plume and the veiled face
gone forever. Yet, after all, that was only formal courtesy. Courtesy
thrives although often uncultivated.
How far does courtesy go toward increasing a man's ability to perform,?
ourtesy a quality that tends toward efficiency? The answer is unmis-
bly yes. The most successful people are selfless people. Against the
vds of humanity that clamor for consideration - and special considera-
-the great man stands undaunted with a surplus of good humor. The
ory where employees are most courteous is usually one of the most
lent plants that can be found. Courtesy creates a mental condition
:h tends, at least, toward success.
Courtesy takes time, but a very little time. Could not enough speed
sacrificed to permit courtesy everywhere? That was the individual's

SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
All String and Wind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the summer.

I I

-Dixboro News.
That reminds us of thebcolored gent
named Roland M. Bones.
The Noticeable Inflection
While working at the Citizen's Ice
Plant Friday afternoon Mr. A. Stan-
field fell and inflected many painful
bruises although the Dr. believes he
will suffer no serious internal in-
jury.

I

B a t h 1 n g Sut.s
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE, "Sport Shop"

nrmany says the Allies asked for peace in 1917, and wants that con-
d now. Wonder if she would like to have the peace of 1871 con-
I too?
onte Carlo is the latest suggestion for a place to hold the Kaiser's
He will find life more of a gamble than he thought possible two

-Washtenaw Post.
Even If You Thought It Was Better
Don't Be Disappointed
An ad says, "Try our coffee and
don't be disappointed."
A headline says, "Canning Demon-
strations." We've seen lots of dem-
onstrations that should have been
treated the same way.
They Like Frank Down at the Office
Mr. Frank Stahl and family of Dex-
ter motored to Ann Arbor Saturday
and put a few good American dollars
in circulation, one of them at the
office of the Past.
-Washtenaw Post.
A sign right here in A. A. says
"Gloves Cleaned Inside, Any Length."
Just like the old one, "Shoes Shined
Inside." Or as a merchant outside
the business district advertises, "Why
Go Downtown to be Cheated, Come
to my Uptown Store."

MVid -Sum mer
Sale
All Light
Three=piece Suits
1=4_Off
N. F. ALLEN CO.
The fHouse of Kuppenhetmer In Ann Arbor

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central .Standard Tiie)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:xo a.
m., and hourly to 8:10 p. m.
Jackson Limited, and Express Cars-7 48
a. i., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (04-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., 9:o5 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:05 p. m., o:so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, x r :45 p. in., 12:20
a. n., x:ro a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--:48 a. m. and
11:2o p. M.
Absolutely..
The Coolest Plce in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann'Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,O00.00
Resources.... . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.

issing soldier is found on a farm.
on comes true in one case at least.

Te sword and ploughshare

d on one roller skate finds more joy in life than a dyspeptic

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