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August 02, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-02

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY

alu eri t e

AT YOUR DOG

THREE TIMES

WARMER

A WEEK

I

VOL. X. No. 17 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1919 PRICE THREE CE

HOU-SE ABANDONS
RHECESS TO AVERT
RAg [IAYSTRI K E
TO CONSIDER WAGE DEMANDS
OF RAILWAY EM-
PLOYEES
LEGISLATORS ACT ON
PRESIDENT'S REQUEST

CHANGES MADE IN
COACHING STAFF
Michigan's 1919 football season drew
perceptibly nearer today with the an-
nouncement of the coaching staff that
is to handle the Michigan's team this
fall.

Proposed Bill Empowers Wilson
Comnandeer and Sell Food
Products

to

Fielding H. Yost will be head coach
of the Michigan Varsity for the nine-
teenth consecutive year. Carl Lund-
gren, Varsity baseball coach, N'ill be
assistant coach, paying especial at-
tention to the backfield candidates.
Ernest J. Allmendinger, '13, will be
hassistant coach in charge of the line,
while Elmer Mitchell, '12, will coach
the freshmen. Mitchell will also aid in
training the Varsity men during pre-
liminary training.
The early training will commence
Sept. 15, and between 25 and 30 men
will be invited to attend this prelim-
(Continued on Page Four)
Tennis Tourney
Decisions To We
Made Next Week

t
.

010 STARS TO APPEAR1
IN SUMMER SPOTLIGHT
Among the several stars of previous
Michigan Union shows who will ap-
pear in the Summer Spotlight show
next Thursday night in Hill auditor-
ium, are "Pete" Emmerman, '19L, and
"Si" Simons, '16E, considered two of
the best performers ever connected
with a Michigan production.
Emmerman sings and recites in a
way that always arouses enthusiasm
among members of his audience, and

DEN EXPLAINS JUNIOR
COLLEGEDEMELOPMENT
(Editor's Note: The following
article touching upon the devel-
opment and present scope of the
Grand Rapids Junior College has
been written especially for The
Wolverine by Mr. George G.
Wright, '13, now dean of that
college.)
(George G. Wright)
The Grand Rapids Junior College
was founded six years ago, with an
.initial enrollment of about 40 stu-
dents. During three years its exist-

PROF. THIEME TO
SPEAK IN FRENCH

Washington, Aug. 1. - The house,
without a record vote, tonight aban-
doned its week's recess plan in order
to comply with President Wilson's re-
quest to take up railway employees'
wage inclease demands. The recess
was to have begun tomorrow night.
In asking congress to create a spe-
cial investigation commission to pass
upon the railway employees' demands,
the President also requested it be stip-
ulated in the legislation that, if wage
increases' are allowed under its
award, it should be mandatory on the
rate making authority to increase rail-
road rates enough to meet the ad-
vances.
The president's request, addressed
to Speaker Gillett, of the house, and
to the Republican floor leader, Mon-
dell, follows:
"The dictator general of railroads in-
forms me that the situation with ref-
erence to the railroads is growing so
critical every hour that I hope it will
be possible for the house to postpone
its recess until some definite action
is taken upon the recommendations
contained in my letter to Mr. Esch.
Officials of the government have been
in consultation with reference to the
problems growing out of the high
cpst of living upon which I expect
recommendations to be made within a
fortnight. I sincerely trust that the
proposed recess of congress may be
postponed, at least until such time as
we may know definitely the problems
which confront us, growing out of this
intricate situation."
Washington, Aug. 1. - Power would
be given the president to commandeer
all food products, fix prices on them
and distribute them for sale through
any method he may devise, under a
bill introduced in the house this aft-
ernoon by Representative James, Mich-
igan. The bill would apropriate $10,-
000,000 for the use of the president in
carrying out its provisions.
Washington, AL. 1. -- It was learn-E
ed late today that the officials with
whom Attorney-General Palmer co-t
ferred regarding living costs would
meet again next Tuesday, at which
time the special committee was in-
structed to inquire especially into
charges of "profiteering."
Julius Barnes, director of the United1
States Grain corporation, has been in-t
viited to attend Tuesday's meeting.
It was not disclosed whether his at-7
tendance presaged consideration of7
the suggestion that this year's wheatt
crop be sold at a price determined
by the law of supply and demand, and
the difference to the farmers be made
up from the billion-dollar congression-
al appropriation.
EXCURSION TO PUT-IN-BAY f
STARTS IN EARLY MORNING
A special titerurban, which carried
the members of the Put-in-Bay excur-
sion, left early this morning for De-
troit where the party will take a boat
for the Lake Erie resort. After spend-
ing the day at Put-in-Bay, the excur-1
sionists will return in the evening toc
Detroit where the interurban will1
meet the party at the docks. They
will arrive in Ann Arbor about 10:30
o'clock."

Fischer and Bassett will meet
Clippert and Parsons in the semi-
final round of the doubles tennis
tournament today to determine which
team is to play Munz and Merkel for
the campus championship. Clippert
and Parsons won their way into the
semi-finals by defeating Breakey' and
Sanchez, 7-5, 7-5.
The finals in both singles and dou-
bles will go to the first side winning
three sets. All semi-final matches
will be decided by the best two out of
three sets.
The doubles finals will be played
next week, probably on Wednesday.
Announcement of the time and offi-
cials will be made in Tuesday's issue
of The Wolverine.
But one match remains in the third
round singles, and this match will be
played today, leaving but seven men
in the tournament. Worth and Bed-
dow are the opponents in the last
third round match.
Angell has already won his way
into the semi-final round by defeat-
ing Merkel, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4, in one of the
best matches of the tournament. As
a result of his play in this match An-
gell is favored by many to win the
singles championship. He will play
the winner of the Breakey-Harbert
match for the honor of representing
the upper panel in the finals.
In addition to Angell, Breakey and
Harbert, Munz, Bowers, Sanchez, and
the winner of the Worth-Beddow
mat remain in the fourth round.
Play in this round will begin im-
mediately and must be completed by
Tuesday night. This will enable the
semi-finalists to complete their match-
es by Thursday night, so that the+
finals can be played one week from
today.
BONISTEELE, '18P, U. S. N.,
ARRIVES HOME ON LEAVE
William Bonisteele, '18P, who en-'
listed in the medical department of
the navy soon after his graduation, is
in Ann Arbor on a leave of absence.'
Bonisteele has been making trips to'
France on the transport Leviathan
for the past year.
CHINESE CLUB GATHERS AT
LANE HALL FRIDAY EVENING
The Chinese students' club held a'
social gathering at 7:30 o'clock Friday+
evening in Lane hall, where a pro-
gram of characteristic Chinese games
was given. Music and singing by the
women of the organization were in-
cluded in the evening's entertainment.
Mrs. Bishop to Entertain League
Owing to the illness of Mrs. L. C.
Karpinski, next week's entertainment
of the Women's league will be given
by Mrs. W. W. Bishop from 3 to 6
o'clock Thursday at her home, 715
Church street. A short program is
being arranged.

announcement of his return, and ap-
pearance in the Summer Spotlight,
has created considerable interest
among those who have seen and heard
him. He made himself famous while
in the University with his vocaliza-
tion of "That's Why They Call Me
State Street Pete."
Simons is a composer who has con-
tributed several very good songs to
the Ann Arbor collection, and has
also done considerable professional
work. Al Jolson and Norah Bayes are
now using his "When It's Onion Hime
in Bermuda." Emmerman will sing
the latter song, with Simons at the
piano.
Rehearsals are being held every
night at the Michigan Union building
under direction of E. Mortimer Shuter,
director of "Come On, Dad," last
year's successful Michigan Opera,
who promises a polished production
by next Thursday night.
NEGROH SITUATION IN
DETROIT NOT ALRMING
-PROFESSOR WOOD.
The negro situation in Detroit is
not alarming at the present time, ac-
cording to Prof. Arthur E. ,Wood, of
the sociology department, who is do-1
ing criminal survey there for the re-
search bureau of the Associated char-
ities. No immediate trouble is an-
ticipated, but a great remedial agency
is considered necessary to improve4
housing conditions for all working
classes.
Professor Wood is conducting in-J
vestigations in crime statistics and
particularly in regard to the negroi
situation. He spends three days of<
each week in Detroit and his research
will result in a case work on special
agencies, the family, the delinquent,
which will be published this fall.
Because of rapid growth and gen-
erally congested conditions the hous-
ing problem in Detroit is a grave one,l
says Professor Wood. All types ofi
crime have increased, but redemptiont
lies in the fact that automobile in-
dustries are still in need of labor and
wages are high. As long as there is
no decline in manufacturing the labor
situation is tolerably good.
Detention houses are financed by
the community union, and a housing
corporation has started buildings toi
rent at low rates. One brick house,
old and almost a hovel, in a negro
district was found to rent for $75 per
month.
Professor Wood will also have
ready for publication this fall a new
publication, "Housing and Health
Survey of Princeton, New Jersey." Itj
is an investigation and critical analy-<
sis of housing conditions in that lo-
cality.

ence was somewhat precarious, and it
would seem that it was on the point
of dying out altogether, when a sur-
vey of the Grand Rapids school sys-
tem, made by a committee of which
Prof. Calvin 0. Davis, of the educa-
tional department of the University of
Michigan, was a member,,recommend-
ed that the work of the school should
be both maintained and extended.
From that time to this progress has
been rapid, and during'the year just
past there, were more than 500 stu-
dents enrolled, of which more than
300 were in the day school.
The Grand Rapids school, which
started out merely as an echo of the
Californian Junior college, and offered
in its early years only such courses as
would fulfill typical "fresh-lit" re-
quirements, has in the past two years
taken on much of the complexion of
the Ohio municipal colleges, and has
offered more or less complete courses
of its own, as suggested by local con-
ditions. It is necessary, however, to
state here with some emphasis that it
has ever been the ideal of the faculty
and administrative officers of the
Junior College to send on to the Uni-
versity every student who seemed
capable of appreciating and profiting
by further educational experience, and
a very large and increasing propor-
tion of our students have in fact thus
continued their studies.
Special Departments~
It is not the purpose of the present
article to dwell upon the general char-
acter of the Junior College movement,
either in Michigan or elsewhere, but
rather to indicate a few somewhat
special developments in the Grand
Rapids institution, which may be of
interest to educators, in suggesting
the possibilities of the junior college
as they have been discovered and
worked out in this particular city.
The Junior College offers of course
the first two years of work leading to
the Arts and Engineering degrees in
the university. Courses in rhetoric
and literature, classical and modern
languages, history, mathematics, phys-
ics, economics, etc., of first and sec-
ond year college grade are offered, so
that a student may elect such courses
as fit his tasks or his future profes-
sion or business.
School of Art and Industry
The first special development with-
in the Junior College came about as
a result of the demand in Grand Rap-
ids for men and women trained in
artistic design. Grand Rapids, be-
sides being a printing and advertising
center, is of course one of the world
centers of high-grade furniture manu-
facture. As such, the city offers a
fine field for designers. By the es-
tablishment of the school of art and
industry, the board of education has
attempted to meet this need, and under
the direction of Mr. Harry M. Kurtz-
(Continued on Page Four)

Prof. Hugo P. Thieme's lecture "La
France et l'Amerique pendent et
apres la Guerre" to be'given in French
at 5 o'clock Monday afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium marks the
first trial in an experiment by the
Summer session officials to determine
if lectures in foreign languages will
prove popular.
The opinion of Dean Kraus is that
the result will be satisfactory because
of the large number of students reg-
istered in French courses, both ad-
vanced and elementary. The talk
Monday is to be somewhat similar to
the lectures which are given during
the regular session under the aus-
pices of the Cercle Francais.
Professor Thieme is a member of
the French faculty and collaborated
with Dean John R. Effinger in writ-
ing the text book used in elementary
French courses.
Stove Leaguers
Give More Old
Scores to'Tigers
(By Whozzat)
"Well, why shouldn't we utilize these
old baseball scores?" queried the sec-
retary of Ann Arbor's newly organiz-
ed Stove league, when questioned re-
garding the activities of the league.
"Many of these scores were made by'
Detroit teams and still rightly belong
to them.
"These scores were made by Michi-
gan teams all the way from 20 to 50
years ago. They have been laying
around out here in Ann Arbor ever
since. The team has no further use
for them and if they can be used toI
advantage by the Detroit team, I see'
no reason why we should not turn
them over to Manager Jennings."
That is the situation as it stands at
present. Moved by pleas of govern-
ment officials that nothing should be
permitted to go to waste, the Stovel
league has determined to do its part.
"Take the game played| between
Michigan and the Hiawatha club in
1886, for example," said the secretary1
of the league. "In this game Michigan
scored 75 runs to 10 for the opposing
club. Think what Jennings could do
with those 75 runs on Detroit's presentl
eastern trip."
Officials' Attitude
That is the attitude of the Stovel
league officials. The scores are laying
around out here and no one is using
them. Meanwhile, the cost of living
is steadily advancing, simply because
these baseball scores, and other simi-
lar essentials, are not being utiliezd.
"We do not wish to be misunder-
stood," said the. secretary of the league
when questioned. "We are not at-
tempting to force our aid on the De-
troit club or on its supporters. We
are attempting to co-operate our work
with other reconstruction plans of the
government, which, it is hoped, will
result in a great saving. While the
government saves food, we will gather;
together these old scores which have
lain unused for so long. Working with
the government in this way we shouldf
prove a powerful force in the conser-
vation cause."
Second Batch
The second batch of scores, offered;
by the Stove league to Detroit, was
gleaned from early day statistics. In
1867, according to the secretary of the!
league, Michigan's second Varsity
baseball team played two games, both
with the Detroit city team. Detroit
won the first, 36 to 20, but Michigan!
won the second 70 to 17. The second
game required three and one-half
hours and completely exhausted both
teams. Six home runs were made in
this contest.

The following year two more games!
were played with Detroit. Michigan
won the first 26 to 24 in an overtime
game when the Wolverine sluggers
poled out two home runs in the elev-
enth inning. The second game re-
(Continued ,on Page Three)

UNIO9N CAFETERIJ
AND SODA BAR T
OPEN WEDNE5O1
PRACTICALLY ALL OF EQUIPME
INSTALLED AND READY
FOR USE
SOFT DRINK BAR TO B
GRILL ROOM FEATUI
Decorations of Semi-Futurist Desi
Soda Fountain 30 Feet in
Length

Wednesday of next week is th
probable date for the opening of th
*new Union cafeteria and soda ba
located in the basement of the build
ing. Meals and refreshments at popu
lar prices are to be served there.
.Except for the tables and a few min
or furnishings, practically all the fix
tures have been completed and in
stalled. The lunch counter and th
soda bar, which are of oak, are com
plete and modern, and were selecte
by the Union with a view to securin
the highest efficiency. Through thi;
means it is expected that the servic
will be unusually prompt.
Near-Beer Service
The Union plans to make the -nev
;rill in some measure reminiscent o
anti-prohibition days. In mugs coole
in a refrigerator and handed out ove:
a bar with a brass foot rail, near-bee:
will be sold to the student patrons
The best up-to-date brands will be
"on tap" at the bar.
Soft drinks also will be dispense
from the fountain, the most complete
in Ann Arbor. It is 30 feet in lengtl
and its size is considered a guarante
that large crowds can be taken care
of quickly.
Futurist Decorations
The decorations of the grill roon
are of a semi-futurist design. Tiles o
bright colors form mosaics in the wall:
and this color scheme will be carrie
out in the tables and chairs. Eac
table, of which there are 38, with a
total seating capacity of 152, will b
enameled in four colors, and will b
supplied with chairs each correspond
Ing to one of the four tints. The over
head lighting fixtures are designed t4
follow out the color motif.
The remainder of the building i
likewise being pushed to completion
All temporary floors are being torn uj
and the permanent flooring is being
laid. i
WHAT'S GOING ON
August 2
5:30 a. m.-Excursion to Put-in-Bay
Lake Erie, under the direction o:
Prof. I. D. Scott, via Michigan Cen-
tral railroad to Detroit and steame
to Put-in-Bay.
August 4
5 p. m.-La France et, l'Ameriqu
pendant et apres la Guerre (
French), Prof. Hugo P. Thieme.
8 p. m.-The Yangtse Gorges and Be
yond (illustrated), Dr. C. E. Thomp
kins, of Fuchau, China.
August 5
5 p. m.-The Origin and Nature o
Color in Plants (Illustrated), Prof
H. Kraemer.
8 p. m.-The Care of the Injured Sold
ie with Special Reference to th
Blind and Deaf, Prof. W. R. Parker
August 6
5 p. m.-The British General Electio
of 1918, Prof. R. M. Wenley.
8 D. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni
versity School of Music (Hill audi
torium).
Augut 7
5 p. m.-Where Are We Coming Out i1
Vocational Education? Prof. G. !
Myer.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures
8 p. m.-Joyshow, under the Auspice
of the Michigan Union. Admissiol
will be charged. (Hill auditorium.

o

PRESBY'TERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets
:30 A. M. Sermon by Rev..John Comin.
:45 A. M. Talk by Prof. W. D. Henderson.
:30 P. M. Young People's Evening Service.

10
11
6

f -

_

THE MICHIGAN UNION PRESENTS ITS

Thursday
August

SUMMER

SPOTLIGHT

Admissioi

60c

MINSTREL AND VAUDEVILLE.=
PERFORMANCE EXTRAORDINARY

Hill Auditorium

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