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July 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-26

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CLOUDY; PROBABLY
SHlO WERN

mY

Woiurriur~

ATr YOUR DOC
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

VOL. X. No. 14 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1919 PRICE THREE 4

WISON PROMISES
CONSIDERATION OF
FIVRSERVTIONS
C1IANMES NECESSARY TO RATIFI.
CATION OF TREATY, SAY
G. 0. P.'S

DEVEREUX TROUPE
TO PRESENT TWO ,
OLD P LAYS TODAY
"THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL"
WILL BE GIVEN THIS
A FTERNOON
EVENING SHOW TO BE-
"ROMEO AND JULIET"
Miss Zinita Graf Heads Company with
Leslie Austin Supporting as
Co-Star

EXPERT RIFLEMEN TO GIVE FREE
INSTRUCTION IN MARKSMANSHIP

PRESIDENT
SHANTUNG.

HOPEFUL OF
ADJUSTMENT

Declares Criticisms of League Coven-
ant Neutralize One
Another
Washington, July 25. - President
Wilson today promised to give earn-
est consideration to five proposed res-
ervations to the peace treaty and
League of Nations covenant which
were presented him by Senator Spen-
cer, Republican, Missouri. The sen-
ator told the president the reservations
would have to be agreed upon if the
treaty was to, be ratified in the sen-
ate.
One of the proposed reservations
would provide that the Shantung set-
tlement be reconsidered and read-
justed at the earliest time possible
and another would express regret at
the settlement.
Slantung Matter
President Wilson told Senator Spen-
cer he firmly believed the Shantung
matter would be adjusted quickly and
that action taken today by the state
department would result in a general
clarification of the subject within the
next two or three days. Senator Spen-
cer refused to disclose what action
was being taken by the department,:
saying he considered this part of the
cOnversation with President Wilson
confidential.
The president told Senator Spencer
he felt he should he congratulated for
what he did to secure a modification
of Japan's original demands with re-
gard to Shantung.
Other of the reservations proposed
by Senator Spencer had to do with
the Monroe doctrine; domestic poli-
cies, such as immigration; the right
of congress to determine "future ac-
tion of a warlike character;" and the
right of the United States to with-
draw from the League of Nations with-
out conditions.
President's Views
Senator Spencer said the president
told him he felt that objections and
suggested reservations coming from
various quarters would not harm the
fundamental principles of the League
of Nations, because with the doors
open so mapy criticisms would develop
that they would tend to neutralize
each other.
Senator Spencer laid before the sen-
ate today what he said was an official
copy of China's plea at the Ver-
sailles conference against the Shan-
tung settlement. 1
The petition declares Japan's prom-
ise to return Kiao Chau at some future'
date is "illusory" in that it gives no
pledge to return also the surrounding
territory dominatingKiao Chau. It is
recited that the treaties resulting in
Japan's claims to Kiao Chau, which;
followed the famous 21 demands of
1915, were made under "intimidation"
and that Japan's real aim in entering,
the -war against Germany was to
(Continued on Page Four)

Zinita Graf, leading lady with the
Devereux Players, appearing today
as Lady Teazle and as Juliet.
Tournament Play
In Second Round
First round play in the singles of
the Summer school tennis tournament
ended Thursday night with 32 men
still in the running. Second round
matches are now being played and
will be completed by Monday night.
The results of all matches should be
reported to Dr. May or to George Moe.
But three singles contestants de-
faulted matches in the first round.
,The other matches brought out some
good tennis, three sets being neces-
sary in several instances. Players
who have completed their second
round matches may start third round
play.
,Double Matches
The only first round match sched-
uled in the doubles championship
went to Merkel and Munz, this pair
defeating Norris and Moulthrop 6-0,
8-10, 6-1, after a hard battle. The
first round winners had less difficulty
in defeating Landis and Hart, taking
the latter combination into camp in
two sets, 6-3, 6-2, in their second
round match..
Crossland and Cobane won from
Gilmore and Buel 6-3, 6-4, the first
named team winning its way into the
third round. Second round play in
the doubles must be completed by
tonight. The results will be publish-
ed in Tuesday morning's issue of The
Wolverine.
Results 'of Singles
The results of the first round singles
plly follow: .Ducey, Fullaway, Brea-
key, Shambaugh, and Tracey drew
byes. Huber defeated Spiesberger
13-11, 6-3; Harrison defaulted to Har-
bert; Hardy defeated Adams 2-6, 7-5,
6-4; Cobane defeated Baer, 6-1, 6-1;
Crossland defeated Phillips 11-9, 6-2.
Angell defeated Hert'6-2, 6-1; Mer-
ry defeated Prather 6-4, 6-3; Froemke
defeated McClintock 7-5, 6-4; Shartell
defeated France 6-1, 6-0; Hatch de-
feated Beers 6-2, 6-1; Merkel defeated
Basset 6-8, 6-2, 7-5; Waite defeated
Sterling 6-0, 6-1.
Moulthrop defeated Akers 2-6, 9-7,
7-5; Theumussen defeated Buel 6-0,
6-1; Munz defeated Kyser 6-3, 6-2;
Bowers defeated Lewy 6-1, 6-0; Hart
defeated Chandler 6-3, 6-1.
Fisher defeated Chapman 3-6, 6-2,
8-6; Landis defeated Gilmore 6-2, 6-3;
Weinberg defeated Selling 6-0, 6-1;
Parsons defaulted to Worth; - Norris
defaulted to Hicks; Beddow, Crockett,
Sanchez, Clippert and Yaple drew
byes.

The appearance of the Devereux
players this afternoon and evening in
University hall promises to be the
most pleasing entertainment offered
during the Summer session. The aft-;
ernoon performance, starting at 3:30
o'clock, will be Sheridan's "The School
for Scandal," and at 8 o'clock in the
evening Shakespeare's "Romeo and
Juliet' will be given.
"The School for Scandal" is con-
sidered one of the finest comedies in
the English language, although it was
first produced nearly 250 yeats. ago.
In brilliance of dialogue and in
soundness in construction of plot, the
comedy holds its own with any writ-
ten in modern times, and hardly a
theatrical season passes but sees some
revival of it. It is an example of Eng-
lish comedy at its best.
Story of Brilliant Society
Into the atmosphere of the brilliant
society of eighteenth century London,
where scandal-mongering was the
chief occupation of the beaus and
belles and their attendant wits, Sheri-
dan has projected the story of Sir
PeterhTeazle and his charming young
wife. The lady findsuthis atmosphere1
much to her liking until she herself
falls a victim to the scandal-mongers.
Her flirtation with Joseph Surface, the
polished hypocrite, leads up to the
famous "screen" scene, one of the
most effective and dramatic climaxes 3
known to the drama.
"Romeo and Juliet," Shakespeare's
.most charming love story, is too well
known to be retold. The famous Ital-
ian legend has been played by innu-
merable actors and actresses, and tot
name them would be to name the fore-
most players of all time.
Players Attract Attentiont
The Devereux players promise a
worthy presentation ofboth these
plays, as the company has attracted'
wide attention wherever it has ap-
peared. The performances today are
looked forward to with a great deal
of anticipation by local people. If the
former successes of the players are]
repeated here, which does not seem
unlikely by all reports, it is probable;
that arrangements will be made to1
have them appear again next summer.c
Miss Zinita Graf, who heads thet
(Continued on Page Four) t

In order to select enough men
to make up a University Rifle
team for participation in the na-
tional matches to be held at Cald.
well, N. J., Aug. 1h to 30, tryouts
will be held at 2:30 o'clock Wed.
nesday afternoon at the state rifle
range south of the city. An ad-
mission fee of $1.00 will be charg-
ed, all proceeds from this source
to go toward the defraying of the
team's expenses to the national
meet. Prof. C. E. Wilson will
supervise the tryouts.
Between now and Aug. 16 students
and faculty of the Summer session
and citizens of Ann Arbor will have
an opportunity to receive expert in-
struction in shooting the United States
army rifle. A group of faculty men
and students who during the war built
and operated the famous chain of
navy rifle ranges have secured 10
Springfield rifles and a supply of am-
munition. Several of them will be on
hand at the state range south of town
every Saturday afternoon for the rest
of the session and will give all comers
the same course of instruction that
has made the marine corps and the.
navy the straightest shooting mili-
tary organizations in the world.
Their purpose is to arouse interest
and enthusiasm in the shooting game
at Michigan to the end of developing
a winning rifle team before next
year's national matches. The only
charge will be a nominal one for am-

munition, merely enough to pay the
express charges on the shipment
which was made from New York. As-
sociated with the navy men will be
Prof. C. E. Wilson of the engineering
department, captain of the Michigan
civilian rifle team which will compete
at the matches at Caldwell, N. J., next
month. A number' of vacancies on
this team still exist, and it is hoped
that they may be filled with Univer-
sity men.
The first shoot will be held this af-
ternoon. The range may be reached
by pedestrians by walking out on the
Ann Arbor railway tracks about half
a mile south of Ferry field, from
which point it may readily be seen
about 200 yards east of the right of
way. By automobile it is advisable
to drive out Packard to Hutzel farm
on this side of the stone school house,
turn to the right, down the lane, and
proceed about a half mile, and then
cross the fields to the range.
Prof. J. R. Hayden, of the depart-
ment of political science, George W.
Gilmore, and Walter M. Simpson, stu-
dents in the literary department, all
of whom were in command of navy
ranges during the war, will supervise
the practice, -and they will be assisted
by a number of other experts who are
enthusiasts for the navy rifle range
idea. Everyone who wants to learn
to shoot is invited to come, as are any
old hands who wish to resume the
sport. Old clothes or overalls should
be worn.

PEOPLE SIUPPLYIL
UTMOST TOWAI
SCHOOLS' UPKI
TAXATION HAS REACHED L
DECLARES DEAN-
ELECT
FOREIGNERS SHOULD
EDUCATED -- CHAD

Says

Superintendent )IShoul
Be Subject to Tyranny of
School Board

Airplane Flights
Open to Students
An opportunity to take a trip in the
air is now┬░ offered to the students of
the University for the nominal (?)
sum of 15 simoleons.
Yesterday a plane owned by the
Universal Aviation Company landed
in a hay field just outside of Ann Ar-
bor on the Whitmore Lake road and
hung out its shingle for bginess. Two
customers were taken for their $15
worth of thrills before the plane left.
An attempt was made through the
Athletic association to secure Ferry
field for the use of the planes but the
company was referred to Regent Cle-
ments of Bay City, who is chairman of
the buildings and grounds committee
of the Board of Regents.
The Universal Aviation company
was organized by a number of former
service aviators in Detroit where, for
some time, they have been taking citi-
zens on short flights.
Professor Sellars Will Lecture Monday
"Industrial Democracy" will be the
subject of a lecture to be given by
Prof. R. W. Sellars, of the philosophy
department, at 5 o'clock Monday af-
ternoon in the Natural Science audi-
torium,

WHAT'S GOING ON
July 26
3:30 p. m. - Sheridan's "School for
Scandal."
8 p. m.-Shakespeare's "Romeo and
Juliet." The Devereux company with
Zinita Graf. Admission will be
charged. (University hall).
July 28
5 p. m.-Indutrial Democracy, Prof.
R. W. Sellars.
8 p. m.-Recital. The class in Shake-
spearean reading (University hall).
July 29
5 p. m.-A Ramble through Spain (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. A. Kenyon.
8 p. m.-Some Phases of War Sur-
gery, Dr. J. F. Breakey.
July 30
5 p. m.-The Bataks of Sumatra (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. H. Bartlett.
DIRECTORY TO GO
ON SALE TODAY
The 1919 Summer school directory
will be ready for distribution about
noon today at The Wolverine office in
the Press building, Maynard street.
Subscribers of the paper will receive
the directory free of charge by pre-
senting the cards attached to their
subscription receipts.
To non-subscribers the directory will
be sold for 35 cents, and may be
secured at The Wolverine office,
Wahr's, Graham's, Slater's, or the
Students' Supply store.
The directory has been delayed
somewhat this year because of the
desire of the editors to have it include
the names and addresses of late reg-
istrants. Its completeness, however,
is considered to offset any inconve-
niences caused by the delay in its is-
suance.

"Schools can not run without mo
money and the people are supplyin
to their utmost ability in taxes at tb
present time," said Dr. C. E. Chadse
dean-elect of the school of educatio
of the University of Illinois, yeste
day in his lecture, "The School an
the Community."
"Consequently, it Is up to the scho
people to face this difficulty and se
if there are any unnecessary expend
tures, which I do not believe is so
continued Dr. Chadsey. "If this
true, then expenditures for schoo
must increase in the future, as it wi
be necessary to expand and to r
organize. To secure the money fo
this expansion taxation must rea:
wealth which at the present time
not touched."
The speaker then expressed tl
view that the foreigners should i
reached and Americanized, and tha
this was possible only through t
night schools. Due to the failure
night schools, especially in Detroit, t
teach any more than the mere rud
ments of English to the foreigner
Dr. Chadsey said that it was up to tU
government to pass laws which wou:
force the Americanization of the in
migrants, as the failure of the nigh
(Continued from Page-:One)
schools was traceable tohe disinte
est of the foreigners.
What Foreigner Should Learn
"The foreigner should learn Eng
lish not to know it superficially, whie
satisfies 9 out of 10 of them becaus
it is sufficient to hold their jobs," sai
Dr. Chadsey, "but they should be fore
ed into learning and understanding
the fundamentals of American govern
ment as well as the language in orde
that they may appreciate this country
It is the fault of the immigrants ai
not the fault of the night schools thi
they failed," said Dr. Chadsey.
He then explained how this broad
ening of education for the foreigner
would greatly increase the mone
necessary to the . upkeep of tt
schools. Dr. Chadsey expressed ti
belief that night schools should h
available, to everybody in order tha
the standards of the individual mfgh
be raised.
School Expansion
He showed how recently expansic
had taken place in the number an
kinds of schools, such as schools fo
the sick and for the mentally deficien
which cost several times as much
upkeep as ordinary schools. It is t
enable all these things to grow, tha
Dr. Chadsey urged that careful Ii
vestigation be made concerning tU
amount of money available for tI
schools by taxes.
Dr. Chadsey said that it was th
duty of the public to support th
schools by taxes, and thus to enab
everyone to secure a good educatio
(Continued on Page Four)

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
IHuron and Division Streets

10:30 A. M.
11:45 A. M.
6:30 P.M.

Sermon by Rev. W. B. Shirey.
Prof. W. D. Henderson speaks on
Great Hunger.",
Young People's Evening Service.

"The

IITHE MICHIGAN UNION PRESENTS ITS I

Thursday
August

SUMMER

SPOTLIGHT

Admission

50c

7th

I

=MINSTREL AND VAUDEVILLE
PERFORMANCE EXTRAORDINARY

Eight o'Clock

Hill Auditorium

r

_l

At 3:30-Sheridan's
"THE SCHOOL FOR
SCANDAL"

THE

DEVEREUX

COMPANY

Reserved Seats
75 Cents

-Shakespeare's
n A1nh l_11 r"T53

University Hal, Saturday,
July 26.

SEATS ON SAL
AT WAHR'

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