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July 17, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-17

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THE WOLVE

INE

DCe

' X~ovcrtne

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann, Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
Office Hours: Managing Eaitor-- oo to 2:00 o'clock daily excep't Saturday; Business
Manager-i:oo to 2:00 o'clock daily except Saturday
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
Wolverine at the discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications wilk receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
unless the writer incloses postage.
The Wolverine doed not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehlbert.......................Managing Editor
Phone 2414
J. Ellsworth Robinson................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 15o5
Chesser M. Campbell............City Editor Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
Milton Marx...............Associate Editor I Chas. R. Osius Jr.......... .Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business MVanager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr...,..................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E. Beretta Robert W. Taylor
Samuel Lamport
BUSINESS STAFF
C. P. Schneider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
James C. Coston William Wachs
SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1919
Thornton W. Sargent Jr.--Issue Editor
HOW MANY PEOPLE DO YOU KNOW?
Back in the time of Adam, it was no exaggeration for him to say that
he knew everybody in his world. There was only his wife and children,
and he knew everybody worth knowing. .There wasn't anybody else.
However, as the world grew more populous, as more and more people
came to settle on the earth, it became increasingly difficult for everybody
o know everybody else. And because the task seemed such a hopeless one,
t was abandoned, and people cared only to know those with whom they
had direct contact in business or personal relations.
Nowadays we haven't time to know people. We have our acquaint-
ances in the business world, and we make our conversations with them as
brief as possible. In our personal life we have a few friends, with whom
we foregather once in a while for a game of cards; or an evening at the
heater, and many acquaintances, whose existence means little or nothing
o us and to whom ours means the same.
With every advance of civilization, this condition of affairs seems to
become more acute. In the busy life of the average city business man,
here is little room for personal friendships, of the kind that characterizes
a small country town. In a large apartment house in any big city, the man
who knows his neighbor to any degree of intimacy is a rare specimen; in
most cases he will not even be able to tell the name of the family next
ioor.
And all the time we hear that man is a social animal, that our society
is a co-operative one, that it is only because each one helps in the work
>f the world that any of us are able to get along. It is a beautiful theory,
and a true one, and yet we do not seem to take it literally and concretely.
One of the best ways to know and understand life is to know and under-
stand people. If success in life were measured by the number of one's
friends, instead of the amount of one's fortune, perhaps there would be
fewer failures. "He travels farthest who travels alone," said the poet, but
te is wrong. A man who cannot make friends is not the man to reach the

On the Other Hand-
We Found This in the Mail-Box
For the Humor Colyum E.
Hon. Sir:-Your much discussed
question of some time back concern-
ing the mysterious source of shine on
our dear things' shoes was quite in-
nocently answered by one of them last
night. Having keen sense for se-
curing the solutiogn to unfathomed
mysteries we casually asked a sweet
child while canoeing why she contin-
ually showed us her shoes. We were
surprised to find that she admitted that
it was her shoes she was showing,
and for the reason that she had just
given them their first shine, adding
that, "All the girls of the house come
to use my brush to shine their shoes."
We have now found out that the rea-
son why our loved ones are so rarely
seen within the environs of our classic
Grecian parlors is because there has
been placed in each house a brush to
be used on Sundays only so as to
avoid the newly imposed 15-cent tax.
But what we started out to say was
how is it that we notice that cats fight
so much more vigorously at night than
they do in the daytime?
Al. K. Lie.
Married Life
He (upstairs)-"Mary, where is my
checked coat?"
She (absently)--"Where did you
check it, dear?"
In Memory of
Egbert, a Faithful Goldfish
Who Met His Maker on Wednesday
Morning, July 16, 1919
Lines to Another Chubbite
"Faint heart ne'er won fair lady-"
At least that's what they say;
Also that, "Where there's life there's
hope-"
You'll meet her some fine day.
Pen sonnets to her eyebrow,
Moon round about her chair;
'Tis possible she'll smile at you,
More likely she'll just stare.
Ly. Lack.
By the way, Ly, you want to be sure
and get your poetic license for they
come out pretty soon.
After much persuasion and after
Iweeks of earnest endeavor we have
solved a mystery of .mysteries. One
of the best known boarding houses
has given us the secrets of many of
its famous gastronomic atrocities,
Here they are:
Camouflage Pudding
Take one loaf of well moulded bread,
bind it and gag it and shave it all
over with a corn razor. Then pound
it to a pulp with a croquet mallet,
chop it into squares with a nail file,
and serve smothered in shaving
lather.
Lima Bean Steak
Take 12 unsuspecting lima beans
and beat them into insensibility with
a tack hammer. Add enough fish glue
and broken glass to flavor, place the
mass on the' stove until itsimmers,
then serve on blotting paper floating
in shoe blacking.
Dessert a la Ann Arbor
Take the breast of a milk fed wa-
termelon, well larded, pack full of
carpet tacks, add finely chopped pipe
cleaners in red ink, and serve cov-
ered with liquid court plaster.
Crab Meat Cocktail
Take a pair of old tennis shoes, run

them through a clothes wringer and
let them soak for three days in bay
rum. After they are thoroughly de-
composed add shredded flypaper and
garlic to taste and serve with library
paste.
Of course all this reminds you of the
old gag, how do you make hash? You
don't make hash, Hermione, it accu-
mulates.
The Summer Girl
The summer girl we gladly scan,
We look her o'er;
We find she wears a coat of tan,
And not much more.
--Luke MeLuike.
The summer girl is with us now
And shows some style;
She wears a string of colored beads,
And pleasant smile.
---Hastings (Neb.) Tribune.
The summer girl is here today
In filmy drape;
The sun shines brightly that we may
Behold her shape.
-Detroit Free Press.
The summer girl a-bathing goes,
She does look cute.
And in her vanity case she totes
Her bathing suit. H. W.

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
10:30 SUNDAY
Sermon-Lecture
by
Lloyd C. Douglas
TOPIC
11'1'1A1E'iPRECIATION OF
OUR LEGACY"
First
Baptist Church
Ifuron St., helew State
Sunday Morning
Worship
10:,30 A. M.
Sermon by
Frederick Bentley Igler
"UNDESIRABLES"
11:45-12:30-Students Guild Class
All are welcome to worship
with us

For Your Recreation
We have to offer for your recreation
100 Tennis Rackets
Wright and Ditson's strong line also
the Lee Slotted Throat Racket
All Grades $2.00 to $11.00
Racket Restringing a Specialty
Wahr's Upiversity Bookstores

v4

I

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10; $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

S ASK US

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 5. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

i

i

III

First Unitarian
Church
Corner Huron and State Sts.
SUNDAY 10:30 A. M.
Sidney S. Robins
Minister

Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEU FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing:--Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
ing, or no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the

i

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WHERE THE FAULT LIES
We asked the president of Yale university, Arthur T. Hadley, whether
usic. is getting a square deal in the American colleges. He answered,
o. Otir purpose in putting the question was not to receive authoritative
)rroboration of a belief that we knew to be founded on fact, but to arrive
t the cause of this condition. How does Dr. Hadley explain it? Very
igenuously. "In this, as in many other matters, the colleges reflect the
emand of the American reading public; and the American reading public
as not learned to estimate music at its full value." It is not wholly clear
us, from this brief statement, whether Dr..Hadley rests the larger bur-
en of blame upon the college or the "reading public." However, his words
re an admission that our seats of learning, instead of moulding and direct-
ig popular opinion, permit themselves to "reflect the demand" of that
;inion. Through what subtle process do college educators gauge the
imper and desires of that fluid thing called the public mind? Seemingly
ey accomplish, without elaborate machinery, what the astutest diplomats
nd politicians find a distracting task.
For our part, we do not believe that the American people, whether
ley have learned to estimate music at its full value or no, would in any
ay, shape or manner oppose giving music its rightful place in the college
irriculum. Indeed, it is far; more likely, to our mind, that the majority
ould applaud so sensible a step. It is just about time that a halt was
illed upon this easy labelling of our masses as "provincial" or "back-
ard" or "uncouth." Perhaps they are merely unconsulted in matters of
is kind. But if they are egregiously benighted in cultural questions, it
certainly not to them that our college educators should look for guid-
ice. Such misplaced reliance is an abject confession of weakness and im-
otence. When American educators conquer their timorousness and con-
irvatism, then will music get a square deal in the colleges. Unless the
eading public" conceives a sudden interest in such diverting topics as
irricula and informs their makers where and why, reforms are in order.
'hat, too, might make for justice. - Clipped.
"If I don't sleep for at least eight hours," said a well-known business
an recently, "I know it next morning. If I don't make up for it next
ght, my customers know it."
Over in France at a ball game, the umpire rode to the field in an air-
ane. Over here they sometimes have to ride away from the field in an
nbulance.
Some of the 339th have brought -Russian wives back home with them.
n these be the "Russian horrors" we've been hearing so much- about?
"Police to Make Liquid Out of Whiskey Taken in Raid," said a recent
adline. After which, we presume, they will try to make it fluid.

DETAILS OF NEW State and our help is experienced in
BONDS ANNOUNCED IF YOU WANT SATISFACTI
T__ wo Doors from L NDO
Hill AuditoriumLYNDON
M1ore complete details have been
issued by the headquarters of the
seveith federal reserve district in
Chicago, regarding the new $100 and
$1,000 treasury savings certificates LEAVE Y
soon to be issued by the government. A
It July the $100 bonds will cost QUARRY'S D
$83.60 and will increase at the rate ,
of 20 cents a month until the date of
maturity, Jan. 1, 1924. The $1,000
bonds will cost $836.00 in July and THE S1
will increase at the rate of $2 a month
until the same date of maturity. The TO DEVELOT
bonds bear the same rate of interest
as the War Savings stamps, or four
per cent compounded quarterly.
The new certificates are registered
and are not transferable, and payable EIIXEBERLE &
only to the owner named thereon ex- SCHB
cept in the case of the death or dis- 110 SO.
ability of the holder. They are also
exempt both as to interest and prin- Complete line of Hig
cipal from all federal, state, and local Pianos, V Ctrala
taxes, surtaxes, and excess profits and
war profits taxes. All String
The certificates can be purchased Instrv
from any post office, incorporated
banks, or trust companies that ;re SEE US FOR YOUR
duly qualified' agents for the sale of
W. S. S. certificates. War Savings
stamps and certificates may be ex- Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.75
changed for the new "baby bonds." for the rest of the summer.
Bat h 1 n g Su its
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE "Sport Shop"
G09

every line of Photography.
ON BRING YOUR FILMS TO
COMPANY North

)UR FILMS
AT
)RUG STORE
WAINS
P AND PRINT

SON, Music House
MAIN ST.
rh Grade Pianos, Player
s, Victor Records
and Wind
iments
k MUSICAL WANTS

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:zo a.
i., and hourly to 8-:o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7 48
a. i., and every hour to 9:48 p. "O. (Ex-
presses make local stops west. of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-- :00 a. in.,9 g@5a.
mn. and every two hours to 9:05 p. mn,, zo0so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, s:45 P. i., 12 :2,
a. m., x:zo a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:a8 a. m. and
:11:20 p. M.
Absolutely..
The Coolest Piece in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnnArbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $60,000.00
Resources .......$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

a-,'

according to Howard Chandler Christy.
en's suffrage?

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