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July 17, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-17

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AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

I

Uiolurriurt

AT YOUR DOOR
THREE TLMES
A WEEK

x
.* ... ..

X. No. 11

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1919

PRICE THREE

ANNARORMIHIGNSATRDY, UL 19 119 P !1I Tw i?

JAU

CONFERENCE WITH
TREATY OPPONENTS
"CHERS"WILSO N
PRESIDENT OPTIMISTIC AFTER
CONFERENCE WITH REPUB-
LICAN SENATORS
TALKS WITH HITCHCOCK
TO EXPLAIN COVENANT
McNary Still Demands Reservations
After Parley with
Executive

TRUEBLOOD READSI
AUSTRIAN DRAMA
Prefacing his reading of Haim's
"Ingomar, the Barbarian" with the
statement that Halm, an Austrian, was
a dramatist second only to Shake-
speare, Prof. T. C. Trueblood last
night in University hall gave a public
reading of the play.
Only the principal scenes were giv-
en by Professor Trueblood. The rest
of the play was merely explained to
enable the audience to keep the thread
of the story.
, C e, CHASEY will
SPEAK IN ANN AROR

1919 Football Schedule Calls For
Seven B1attles With Western Teams

70 LEAVE ON TRIP
TO NIAGARA FALLS

(C. N. C.)
Michigan's 1919 football schedule is
the most attractive gridiron program
a Michigan team has had in recent
years. It brings Minnesota and Illi-
nois back into football competition
after an absence of many years, and
continues the time honored rivalry
with Chicago which was resumed last
fall.
Michigan will also meet Ohio State
and Northwestern this year, giving
her five Conference games. Case and
M. A. C. supply the early season op-
position on Ferry field, and complete
a'hard but well balanced schedule.

Washington, July 18. - After con-
ferring at the White House with Re-
publican, senators and holding a re-
view of returning Czecho-Slovak vet-
erans, President Wilson went to the
capitol late today for a conference
with Senator Hitchcock, Nebraska,
ranking Democratic member of the
foreign relations committee.
The Nebraska senator, who had been
informed of the president's coming,
was awaiting him and immediately the
two went into conference in the pres-
ident's room. The senate having ad-
journed, nearly all the other mem-
bers had left for the day.
To Clean Up Misinterpretation
After a three-quarters of an hour
conference with Senator Hitchcock,
the president returned to the White
House. The conference was said by
the president to have been for the,
purpose of removing some of the mis-
interpretation which had arisen dur-
ing treaty discussion by the senate.
Senator Hitchcock said he had dis-
cussed many features of the senate
fight with the president, whom he had
found "very cheerful" over the out-
look. The senator did not go into de-

CH ANG i4S TOPICS OF LECTURES,
IN COMMUNICATION TO
DEAN KRAUS
Dr. C. E. Chadsey, superintendent
of Chicago schools, will be in Ann
Arbor next Friday for two lectures.
The first of these talks "Schools and
the Community" will be given at 5
o'clock in the Natural Science audi-
torium, and the second "The Superin-
tendent, the Board, and the Teachers"
at 8 o'clock in the same place.
Dr. Chadsey is considered one of
the foremost educationists in the coun-
try. His constructive work in the
past few years put the Detroit school
system in the educational limelight
because of their advancement under
him.
Dean E. H. Kraus received word
from Dr. Chadsey Friday afternogn
that he would certainly appear. The
speaker informed Dean Kraus con-
cerning the new subjects of his lec-
tures, it having been announced on
the Summer session program that he.
would talk on current educational
topics.
EXPLAINS FORMING
OF NIAGARA FALLS3

Case Opens Season
Case will open the Michigan season
for the thirteenth time this fall when
the Cleveland institution invades Fer-
ry field on Oct. 4. This will be the
twenty-third game between the two
schools, the first football game having
been played in 1894.
Oct. 11 is a blank date on the Mich-
igan schedule and no game will be
played on that day. The second game
of the season will be played on Ferry
field, Oct. 18, with M. A. C. The Ag-
gies have been tough ' picking for
Michigan teams in recent years, al-
though for the past two seasons the
scores have been rather one-sided.
The following Saturday, Oct. 25,
Ohio State comes to Ann Arbor, and
if history repeats itself this should
not prove an especially difficult con-
test. Michigan teams have shut out
Ohio State in 11 of the 15 games that
have been played, and the Buckeyes
have yet to win their first contest.
Ohio's best effort against a Yost
team was in 1910, when Michigan was
held to a 3 to 3 tie. All told, Ohio has
scored but 21 points in the 15 games
played, to 351 for Michigan.
Northwestern Comes Nov. 1
Northwestern comes to Ann Arbor.
Nov. 1, and in this game the Wolver-
ines will have a defeat to avenge. The
last game played was in 1917, North-
western winning 21 to 12. The two
institutions have met but five times,
although the first game was played in
1892. This contest was also a victory
for Northwestern, giving the Purple
,two wins out of five games played.
Yost's men will be out for revenge
on Nov. 1. With three victories to
their credit in former games, the Wol-
verines will strive to increase their
margin. The closeness of the North-
western record is due to the fact that
the Purple played but one game with
Michigan during the first 16 years
Yost was at Ann Arbor. The one
game played resulted in a 29 to 0 vic-
tory for Michigan.%
Michigan will play Chicago at Chi-
cago, Nov. 8. Rivalry which has ex-a
tended over a period of 28 years;
makes this game stand out as one of
the most, if not the most important
contest of the 1919 season.
Michigan has won 10 of the 16
games played, defeating the Stagg

eleven 13 to 0 last fall. Chicago's last
victory came in 1905 when a safety
cost Michigan the game by a 2 to 0
score, the only points scored against
the men of Yost that year.
Games Bitterly Contested
Chicago-Michigan games have 'al-
ways been bitterly contested, the
championship of the west frequently
hinging on the outcome. For years
Michigan alumni in and near Chicago
have been clamoring for a Michigan-
Chicago game on Stagg field and the
Wolverines will not lack support
when they invade the Midway strong-
hold, Nov. 8.
Michigan will play her only other
away-from-home gane Nov. 15, when
the Varsity meets Illinois at Urbana.
This will be the first game Michigan
has played with the Illini since 1906,
the withdrawal of the Wolverines from
the Conference ending further compe-
tition.
Michigan has won all five games
played with Illinois, holding the Illini
scoreless in three of the contests.
While this game will be far from a
practice contest it may offer the Var-
sity slightly easier opposition and so
leave them in good shape for the final
game with Minnesota the following
Saturday.
Big Game With Minnesota
Minnesota comes to Ann Arbor, Nov.
22, for the big home game of the 1919f
season. Friendly rivalry, which has
existed since the first gameo was play-{
ed between these institutions in 1892,
makes the resumption of relations
(Continued on Page Four)

Approximately 70 students left Fri
day afternoon on a special interurban
car for Detroit, where they took a
boat for Niagara Falls. This is twice
the number of persons who usually
make the trip, and to care for th
larger crowd it was necessary for tw(
men, Prof. I. D. Scott and Mr. F. W,
Frostic, to conduct the party. I
The excursionists reached Niagara
Falls this morning and will remain
there until Sunday evening when they
will return to Ann Arbor via Detroit.
While at the Fall's students will take
the Gorge trip, the "Maid-of-the-
Mist" ride, the descent under the
American side, and other excursions.
A special interurban took the party
directly to the D. and C. docks, and on
the return they will be met there and
brought out to Ann Arbor on a spe-
cial car.
CAST OF 30 ASSEMBLED
FOR SUMMER SPOTLIGHT

[-
n
a.

TO LENGTHEN OFFICIA
ENTRANCE BY 30 FE
Tf'o Move Flag Pole on Wheels i
Near Library to New Position
In mail

Senator McNary, Oregon, after con-
ferring with the president, said Mr.
Wilson had presented facts which ma-
terially modified first impressions of
the Shantung settlement. Concern-
ing the League of Nations the Oregon
senator said he found himself sub-
stantially in accord with the presi-'
dent,
Reservations Still Asked
The possible effect of reservations
in senate acceptance of the treaty was
paid to have been discussed at length
at the conference, but Mr. McNary
(Continued on Page Four)
WHAT'S GINGON

NEW DIAGONAL T1
EXTEND FROM 6GY
TO ALUMNI .HI
WILL COMPLETE OLD PLAN
TWO WALKS ACROSS
CAMPUS

July 21
6 p, m.-The Origin of Variation, a
Fundamental Problem of Organic Ev-
olution, Prof. Bradley M. Davis, of
the University of Pennsylvania.
July 22
6 p. m,-Why the Public should be in-
terested in the Education of Nurses,
Prof. Dora M. Barnes.
8 p. m,-The Racial Heritage of the
War, Prof. A. F. Shull.
July 238
6 p. m.-The Landscape Cemetery, An
American Creation (Illustrated),
Prof. A. Tealdi.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
July 24
5 p. m.-The Manufacture of Beet
Sugar (Illustrated), Prof. W. L. Bad-
ger.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 25
6 p. m.-Some Present-Day Educa-
tional Problems (two lectures), Dr.
C. E. Chadwick, superintendent of
schools, Chicago.:
8 p. m.-Same lecture.
Jmly 26
3:30 p. m. - Sheridan's "School for
Scandal."
8 p. m.-Shakespeare's "Romeo and
Juliet." The Devereux company with
ipita Graf. Admission will be
charged. (University hall).

Illustrating his lecture with slides
showing views of Niagara, Prof. I. D.
Scott accounted Thursday afternoon
for these geological formations. He
said that the gorge of the Niagara
river varied in its width and that
this was the result of ages of action.
"Niagara Falls were formerly at
Lewiston and after many years the
falls have worked their way to the
present site. Long ago there were
lakes, different in shape than the
present Great Lakes system. These oft-
en had another outlet, through which
most of the water ran to the sea.
When this was the case, the volume of
the water flowing through the Niagara
was not so great, and consequently
the river was not so wide. However
when geological upheaval would cause
most of the water again to flow
through the Niagara and over the
Falls, the channel would again be-
come wider.
"By gradual wearing away the
Falls moved backwards from Lewis-
town, until they are at the present
place. Measurements show that the
Canadian Falls are wearing away at
the rate of five feet a year. If the
Falls eventually move back even far-
ther or if there is another geological
change in the shape of the earth in
that region, it is probable that, the
Great Lakes will find their outlet
through the Illinois river down to the
Gulf by way of the Mississippi," con-
cluded Professor Scott.

JOURNALISM STUDENTS VISIT
DETROIT NEWSPAPER PLANT
Students of journalism in the ,Uni-
versity went to Detroit Friday and
were shown through the offices 'and
plant of the Detroit News. Neil A.
Voight acted as guide to the party and
explained the work of the various de-
partments with the purpose of giving
the students an understanding of the'
organization of a metropolitan news-
paper.
The party was composed of about
25 students and Prof. John R. Brumm,
who has charge 'of the journalism de-
partment.
SUMMER SESSION OFFICE IN
NEED OF MANY CATALOGUES
Demands for Summer session cata-;
logues by mail and by the students
have been so great because of the
record attendance that the present
supply is exhausted. Because of this
outside demand, Dean E. H. Kraus
asks those students who are not us-
ing their catalogues to return them
if possible, to the office of the Sum-
mer session...
This favor would be greatly appre-
ciated by Dean Kraus.

r
r.
t
s
t
s
f
IS
a
a
c
r
a
b

FIRST HALF OF ENTERTAINMENT
WILL BE MINSTREL
SHOW
With a cast of more than 30 men
who have participated in former cam-
pus productions assembled, rehearsals
for the Summer Spotlight Vaudeville
of the Michigan Union, to be held
Aug. 7, will start at 7:15 o'clock next
Monday night in the Union building.
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of
"Come On, Dad," the Union opera that
last winter scored the biggest hit ever
made by a campus production, is on
the ground and has laid plans for a
show that is expected to eclipse any-
thing that has heretofore been
given on the campus in the summer.
According to present plans, the first
half of the program will be a minstrel
show, with a company of about. 25
funmakers. Mr. Shuter has sent to
New York for, the very latest songs,
and he himself is writing the lines
and jokes.
Following the minstrel show will
come several vaudeville. acts of va-
ried character. Quite a number of,
wcts are being considered, and the
best of them will be selected for the

show. s
Mr. Shuter expressed himself .yes-
terday as being very well pleased with
the quality of talent available. On
going over the lists he found a large
number of men who worked with him
in "Come On, Dad," last winter, be-
sides others who have participated in
other campus dramatic productions.
Also, there are several try-outs who
show records of performances else-
where.
An advertising and ticket cam-
paign is being worked out, and will
be started within the next few days.
No great difficulty is anticipated in
crowding Hill auditorium, since the
Michigan Unon, judging from the ma-
terial available and the fact Mr. Shuter
is directing, feels the show will be
among the best it has ever produced.
Women's League Featured Stunts
Stunts were the feature of the third
summer party of the Women's league
given last Thursday afternon in Bar-
bour gymnasium. Aletha Yerkes, '20,
was in charge of the program.
The league is planning further en-
tertainments for the future which will
inc'lude several lectures and a play.

Construction of a diagonal
from Alumni Memorial Hall to Wf
man gymnasiumwill be one of n
improvements which are to be c
on the campus this summer.
walk will in part complete the or
al plan to have the campus cro
by two diagonals.
At present there is no direct r
from Alumni Hall to the gymnas
and this .new walk- will greatly s
ten the distance across the can
As the library is nearing con
tion, preparations are beirg mad
have the official entrance to the
pus set thenew building off1
proper manner. The mall betty
the Natural Science and Chemi
buildings which is the official
trance to the University grounds,
be lengthened about 30 or 40 feet.
the center will then be placed
flag pole which was recently to
from its old place near the library
the diagonal walk.
Pole Put on Wheels
The pole has been placed on wh
ready for moving and will be pl
in its new position in the near fui
To take the old flag pole down, it
necessary to blast away the bal
cement, nine feet in dilmeter, w
held the pole up.
New Walks Planned
It is also planned to build s
walks leading to the entrance of
library, with the idea of making
new building the central feature
the campus. Stakes have alre
been set for someof these. A la
walk to which the smaller ones
lead, will be constructed at the
of the imposing steps.
Other incidental improvements
being made, one of the most im:
tant of which is the laying of
walks near the Natural Science bt
ing which will make that buildini
easy access from University hall.
The flag pole is 150 feet high. I
ing an electric storm last spring
was struck by lightning, and the
per part broken. After . some c
culty the unbroken piece was secui
and was raised in time for the grad
tion exercises. It was taken d<
immediately afterwards.

*First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister

10:30
11:45

A. M.
A. M.

Sermon by Rev. W. B. Shirey.
Prof. W. D. Henderson-The Church and
the World Crisis.
Young People's Evening Service.

6:30 P. M.

PROFESSOR CORWIN
PRAISES STANTO
Praise of Edwin M. Stanton, sec
tary of war, followed the discussion
the man both adversely and favora
in the lecture "Edwin M. Stanton, .S
retary of War" given by Prof. C.
Corwin, of Princeton university, F
day afternoon in the Natural Scier
auditorium.
Extracts from criticisms of Stani
were read in which he was pictui
as a bad influence upon his coun
in critical times. These few sta
ments were easily refuted by lett(
which Professor Corwin read, wh
had been written by both enemies a
friends. They were full of thehig
est praise and commendation of Sty
ton.
Following this introduction Prof
sor Corwin traced the life of Stani
and showed how he had risen fron
humble position to occupy a place
one of the country's best lawye
Circumstances caused him to
through a period of greatest bards]
when his children, his wife, and SE
(Continued on Page' Four)

t' _._JI- -

Notice to Subscribers
The $1.25 rate will be charged
on all subscriptions that are not
paid before July 20.
Vusiness Manager

ie People are interested in
Christian

Unity

Die big question is
How can it be done?
F. P. Arthur speaks on this at the Union Serbice
Sunday ebening, at
Church qf Christ
South University Abenue

..

wmmp-q

,..

At 3:30-SherIkan's
4THE SCHOOL FOR
SCAN DAL."

THE

DEVEREUX

COMPANY

Reserved Seats
75 Cents,

-Shakespeare's
) AND JULIET"

University Hall, Saturday,
July 26

SEAT SALE AT WAHR'f
Wednesday: 4a30 to4
Thursday and Friday: 5 to 4

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