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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 12, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

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wolverine

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter y
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Steet
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
fice Hours: Managing Editor-i :o to 2 :oo o'clock eaiy except Saturday; Business
Manager--i- :oo to z :oo o'clock daily except Saturday
-omiii cations not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
erine at the discsetion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
:nsigned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
the writer incloses postage.4
he Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehibert......................Managing Editor
Phone 2414
J. Ellsworth Robinson..................Business Manager
Phone 96o or 1505
,er M. Campbell.............City Editor Howard Weeks..............Column Editor
n Marx...............Associate Editor Chas. R. Osius Jr...........Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr.....................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E. Beretta Robert W. Taylor
BUSINESS STAFF
Schneider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
James C. Costo* William Wachs
SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1919.
Issue Editor - Thor nton W. Sargent Jr.

It is a man or woman whose education runs in to thousands and who is
expected to take a leading position in the world, who is lost to the con-
servative, hard-working society of men and women who do things. There
Is the rub.
The only remedy which would appear would be for every university to
have a definite policy of vigorous Americanism and see to it that it is
observed. Under that banner, there is room for the utmost liberalism, when
it is worth its salt. There is room for the foreign teacher and for the
historian who can tell the truth without color er quibble. Americanism,
thank goodness, does not mean extolling the virtues of the gentlemen and
ladies who inhabit Washington, nor find apologies for their acts wh en
those are unwise or foolish. The German idea in higher education was to
advertise the greatness and divinity of the Hohenzollerns. In America, we
can still disagree with our public men when they are wrong and by ballot
remove them.

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS

We offer quantities of New. and Second H-and

TEXT BOOKS

for all departments. Our stock of LOOSE LEAF NOTE
BOCKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, Etc., Etc., is complete,
A Cordial Welcome and Unusual Service at
Wahr's University Bookstores

1

ARE OUR LARGE AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES UN-AMERICAN?
Under the preceding caption the Michigan Manufacturer and Financial
ord prints an editorial attacking the liberal tendencies of college pro-
sors and accusing them of preaching Bolshevism, and sedition in the
ss rooms. The accusation is almost too ridiculous for comment, but we
rint the entire article in order to show the, false impressions held by
iarently ignorant laymen.
The most impossible of the editorial's - arguments is one which obvi-
ly advocates a censorship of class-room discussions. In favoring a move
his sort the writer forgets that a university is a place where new doc-
aes may be discussed with intelligence and without passion; where "bol-
vism and its related brands of theory" are not received "with open
as" and discussed "with comparisons and contrasts all in its favor." If
re is any one place at which new ideas can be weighed with sanity and
lerstanding so that their merits or .shortcomings may be pointed out, that
ce is the large American university, which the editoral practically brands
un-American.
As a people we make no claims to absolute perfection, but we do feel
our privilege and our duty to strive for the attainment of the highest
ndards of moral, social, and political welfare. By what means other
.n the open discussion of new ideas by ntelligent men and women can we
e to arrive at any such point of development? Should Bolshevism be
cussed openly in the street and yet be barred from the lips of the more
Leated classes? We do not accuse the author of the editorial of advocating
curtailment of the right of free speech - the only step which can pre-
At open discussion by the masses ,-- yet he does seek the placing of a cen-
ship over the utterances of college professors.
The editorial follows:
Not long ago an employer of labor in Detroit who believes that his
siness exists for something besides making money for him, decided to
id two young men from his draughting room to a university to give them
opportunity to perfect themselves in a line of study very essential in his
ustry.
Because the work was specialikd, he made a careful survey of the
ools to determine where the men could have the best advantages. Both
I risen to this stage of their career through hard work. They had not had
y especial advantages of education and culture before.
The employer believed that it was important what school his two
n attended because, being men who would be readily influenced by their
roundings,,would regard the opportunity given them as a sort of emo-
nal experience. He did not want them to get side-tracked on any shol-
ic theories and fads in education which would interfere with their best
gress after they were returned to industry. He therefore made a little
estigation of the things taught at a number of the most important schools
I was astonished with the result. The men have not yet started for any
iversity and the employer who will send them is certain that when they
go, they will be exposed to the taint of loose-reasoning and faddishness
ich, .disguised as socialism or ultra-modern economics, is being instilled
o young people on practically every campus in the country by profes-
s who harbor academic and impractical theories.
Most of us think when we send our sons and daughters to college that
are giving them the opportunity which will almost insure their success
life. And it should be so. Nothing should be left undone t prepare
lege men and women to recognize opportunity when it comes, to have the
lity to make, the most of it and to work hard after it Is secured, to wring
m its possibilities the success which makes life valuable and worth
Ile. But where is there a college which recognizes the importance of the
.dent's future? Where is there a faculty that places anything ahead of
npus traditions and precedent? Surely it is not to be found among the
ger universities of the country. Without attempting to be rea'tionary,
re is still much to be said against the things in university curricula which
'e a tendency to break down the faith of the young man and woman in
basic things of life and the time-tried foundations of American liberty
I worthy Institutions.
There are many cases where philosophic teachings have been arranged
t have little other function than to break down the student's home-
tght brand of theology an dundamental doctrine of honest dealing, without
empting to erect a new s ucture based on broader if not more valuable
es. It is a notorious fact, also, that bolshevism and its related brands of
ory have been received in the universities with open arms and are dis-
ised in hundreds of classrooms in the country with comparisons and con-
sts all in its favor.
The problem is a hard one to reach. Who shall be the judge of what
st and must not be taught in our schools? The federal government?
aven forbid. Its co-operation, guidance and advice is always welcomed,
Epaternalistic education would be a failure. It must be .kept free of
itical influence. Then is it the state legislature which appropriates most
the money used? There is no legIslature educationally qualified as a
ly to tell a faculty what it should and should not teach. The public?
has not the facts. There. is no easy means whereby a professor who
ches sedition, heresy or traitorous matter could be recalled. Yet it is
:x . :mr.'r _ . _ ..._ _. _ ,_ , .s. s. ___ _ w _ , y .. _ .t.. -_ t -_ a . r.. -,i s

On the4n Other Hand-
4,000 GREAT LAKES GOBS
WILL GO TO SEA-Headline.
Now that all the danger is over, thef
Great Lakes navy starts out.
More Uniquer Than Ever
Speaking of a new fraternity house'
that is under construction, the A. A.
Times News says: "Unique plans for
the housing of the members have been
developed, as each student will have
a study room and a sleeping apart-
ment. The individual study 'oom and
sleeping room plan is believed to be
unique in such homes in this country.
In most fraternity houses the "mem-
bers make use of a common study
room or make use of a student's sleep-
ing room to do their studying in. Other
unique plans have been developed, -t
is said."
Probably among the other unique
details, they don't eat in the shower-
bath, but take their meals in the din-
ing room, and practically no fire-
places will be found on the front
porch.
These Dirty Millions Grow So Quickly
Edsel Ford says that he and his fa-
ther have been sitting up all night
trying to figure out how to keep their
annual profits at $25,000,000.
It certainly is a hard life.
Golf bugs of every sort are found,
No matter where you go;
Each has his own pet shot, and boy,
He's sure to tell you so.
One says, "Give me the twenty foot
putt."
There're lots of those alive,
But of all the pokes here's waht I
say:
Give me the nice long drive.
"Give me the mashie,' 'one bird says,
"It'll cut my score from 8 to 5,"
But let me stand upon that tee
And shoot a nice long drive.
.'The midiron shot's the one for me,"
They say, but when I arrive
I want to swat that pill, and so
Give me the nice long drive.
As we have observed before, one
gent running this here colyum is
prety well tied up, especially when
the sheet blossoms four times a week,
so if you see anything that brings a
grin, clip or write and let's have it.

Ic
w+
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W 1 7 7
w(
W '~i J
3/76 f

10:30 SUNDAY
Sermon-Lecture
by
Lloyd C. Douglas

FIRST
ONCREGATIONAL

CHURCH

TOPIC

"The Impeachment
of Opportunism"

w
r'

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 5. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
HURON BELOW STATE- ST.
MORNING WORSHIP
10:30 A. M.
"TORCHES"
FREDERICK BENTLEY IGLER
STUDENT GUILD CLASS
11:45-12:30
Summer School Students
Welcome

I

.

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
4
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

p
Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY

ASK US

We have led in amatvur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing :-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping or no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State and our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO
Two Doors from LYNDON & COMPANY North
Hill Auditorium iUnversity Avenue

U

I

I[

First Unitarian
Church

11'

R

--------

r

Corner Huron and State Sts.
SUNDAY 10:30 A. M.
Sidney S. Robins
Minister

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE

FOR

11

List to This Tom-Loveleque Philosophy
A stude whose name shall not ap-
pear wept as, exams drew swiftly
near, the reason being for his tears
that all his work was in arrears. And
since he'd scarcely cracked a book,
he thgught he'd better take a look,
lest, when the marks were passed
about, with neck pulled in he'd wig-
gle out. Yet stronger grew his pal-
pitations as nearer drew examina-
tions. Alas, he couldn't chute-the-
chute, and so retired, on brass-toed
boot.
So now my Summer schoolers dear,
I hope I've made the moral clear:
Build up, before you go to bat, the
architecture neath your hat. Our
prizes, ah, how oft we've missed 'em
because we had a faulty system, be-
cause we didn't oil our wheels, or
turned up late, perhaps, at meals, and
caring just for delicatessen, alacka-
day! we missed the blessin'. So while
there yet is time make hay and see if
you can pull an "A."
(Contributed)
One Usually Does
You will enjoy using the A. B. A.
cheques as issued by this bank. -
Ad. in the Wolv.
Let us dispel some of the illusions
that surround the movie bathing
queens that are soon to grace our
fair city. A near relative of ours
took 'em swimming and of course the
gels looked as well as may be expect-
ed in their costumes (see ads.) but
one thing marred the party. Perhaps
it was too slight to comment on but
at that it was rather perturbing. You
everything went well until time came
to go in the water and then the only
drawback was the poor things could-
n't swim.

Striking, Isn't He?
"Yes," observed the village wit as
he looked over the Living Skeleton,
"he'd make a fine match for some
girl." H. W.
MEXICANS IN U. S. TO RECEIVE
LAN D FROM HOME GOVERNMENT
Mexico City, July 11.-Among the
methods adopted by the Mexican gov-
ernment to aid Mexican labors in the
United States who have suffered dur-
ing the reconstruction period follow-
ing the ending of the war, is one by
the department of agriqulturt to allot
small lots of land in Lower California
to those who wish to return their
homeland from north of the Rio
Grande. By this means it is hoped to
repatriate thousands of Mexicans and
also to populate and render productive
the millions of acres of land in Low-
er California which the government
has taken over from the former con-

I

SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

cessionaries for not carrying out their
obligations.
Requests from more than 300 Mexi-
can families now residing in El Paso,
fexas, that they be allowed to return
to Mexico to engage in farming, have
been received by the department of
agriculture here and intimation is giv-
en that the federal government in the
near future will provide for their re-
patrication.

..

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackso,
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--8:-o a.
n., and hourly to 8:1o p. m
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. in., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9q:05 p. M., o:'50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 1a:20
a. in., r :so a. m, and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:s8 a. m. and
1r:20 p. m.
Absolutely..
The Coolest Pl ce in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann'Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .. . .......4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.

Mid =Su m ier
Sale
AN Light
Three-piece Suits
I=4_Off
N. F. ALLEN CO.
The House of Kuppenheimer In AnnArbor

II

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