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July 12, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-12

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+0

'HE WEATHER
CONTINUED FAIR
TOD)AY

LL

Uloluriur

AT YOUR DOo
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

I

VOL. X. No. 8. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1919. PRICE THREE C

CHANGES MADE IN
SUMMER SESSION
LECTURE PROGAM,
NEW FOLDERS ARE . PRINTED
AND READY FOR DIS-
TRIBUTION

REGISTRATION NOW
ABOV42,00 6MARK

DEVEREUX COMPANY
TO APPEAR JULY:

291

Total registration for. the Summer
session has now passed the 2,000 mark.
Exact figures, given out yesterday aft-
ernoon by the Summer session office,
show the number of students to be
2,002, diviided among the various col-
leges as follows: College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, 1,026; Col-
lege of Engineering and Architecture,
423; Medical school, 116; Law school,,
195; College of Pharmacy, 19; Gradu-
ate school, 213.
This count does not exclude those
counted twice because of double reg-
istration, but it is efpected th.at incom-
ing students within the next two weeks
will offset any loss caused from this
source.
This exceeds by almost 400 the reg-
istration in the largest Summer ses-
sion of 1917, and is 800 more than were
here last summer.
FOREST FIRE LOSSES
LESS THAN EXPECTED

i'
'
,I,
_i

COSMO CLUB I YES
UNIQUEPR OGRAM
Japanese, Hindu, French, Russian. and
South African Students
Perform
RALPH CARSON, '17, ACTS
AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES
The League of Nations vaudeville,
presented by the members of the Cos-
mopolitan club in University hall last
night proved to be one of the most,

GER MAN TRADE
TO RE-OPEN SOON
Steamship Lines Will Be Established
as Soon as Cargoes Are
Ready
STATE DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES
RESUMING OF TRADE RELATIONS

FACULTY RECEIVES
SUMMER STUDENTS
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Mrs. Hutchins and representatives of
the various faculties with their wives
receive students of the Summer ses-
sion from 5 to 6 o'clock Friday after
noon in Alumni Memorial hall. Con-
siderably more persons were present
at this year's reception than at those
of past years.
Among the members of the faculty
in the receiving line, were Dean E.
H. Kraus, Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof.
R. W. Aigler, and Prof. L. A. Hopkins.

Miss Hazel M. Stanton of University of
Iowa Will Leeture on Musical
Talent

CAMPUS ARHTISTS
TO, BE ASSEMBLEL
"JOYSHOW" TO BE HELD Al'GU
7 IN HILL AUDITOR-
ENTERTAINMENT TO BF
SPONSORED BY UNl1O

Revised Summer session programs
have been printed and are ready for
distribution. Several corrections . as
well Is additions have been made to
the list of numbers which was pre-
viously published.
The first change is in regard to the
speaker for Monday's lecture at 5
o'clock. Miss Hazel M. Stanton of
the University of Iowa will give a
lecture at this time in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium on "Measure of Mus-
ical Talent," illustrated by the gramo-
phone. Miss Stanton will explain the
methods used in this work. She has
been an assistant to Prof. C. E. Scott
of Iowa university, who, has been
prominent in experimental research in
this line. Records have been made
on discs, which will be placed to ex-
plain the subject.
Probably the most important addi-
tion to the .program is that of the
billing of the Devereux company with
Zinita Graf for two performances July
26. At the first performance in the
afternoon the players will present
Sheridan's "School for Scandal" and
the evening play will be Shake-
speare's "Romeo and Juliet."
Greet Players Unable to Appear
These two numbers will be pre-
sented in University hall, a small ad-
-mission being charged. The Devereux
company was secured to take the place
of the Ben Greet players, who were
unable to come because of a previous
engagement in England. This is the
first time in several years that Ben
Greet and his company have not given
performances in '.nn Arbor.
Prof. Bradley M. Hall of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania has been secured
for a lecture on "The Origin of Varia-
tion, a Fundamental Problem of Or-
ganic Evolution" on Monday, July 21.
Mr. J. del Toro, who was to have
spoken at this time on "lImportant
Factors in the Development of Latin-
America," has been given another
date.
Prof. Kenyon Lectures July 29
An illustrated lecture, "A Ramble
Through Spain," will be given by
Prof. H. A. Kenyon, at 5 o'clock on
the afternoon of July 29. Prof. W. T.
Fishleigh was to have talked on "The
American Public and Its Six Million
Automobiles."
A medical lecture, "The Racial Her-
itage of the War," will be delivered
by Prof. A. F. Shull at 8 o'clock the
afternoon of August 5. "North Africa
Under Rome Rule," an illustrated lec-
ture, will be the subject of a talk by
Prof. J. G. ,Winter, August 14.
Five hundred of the revised pro-
grams have been printed and may be
secured at the office of the Summer
session or at the lectures. At some
later date further revised programs
will be issued if it is found necessary.
The program for the remainder of the
summer as now fixed Is:

DAMAGE IN BOTH PENINSULAS
LESS THAN ONE MILLION
DOLLARS
Lansing, Mich., July 11. --The mon-
etary loss through the recent forest
fires in the upper peninsula and in the
northern section of the lower penin-
sula of Michigan will be much less
than was originally estimated, accord-
ing to State Fire Commissioner Baird.'
Much of the landtburned over was
merely covered with second growth
nd underbrush and most of that is
now in prime condition, it is said, for
farming. Considerable standing tim-
ber and some that had been cut was
touched by the flames in some sections
but the loss in this respect waz much
less than at first was expected. .
The destruction of cover for the wild'
bird and game is considered a serious
loss, however, as practically all cover
was burned over tracts of thousands
of acres. Many lumbering camps were
destroyed, a number of farm buildings
were lost and crops were badly dam-
aged in some sections. There was also
a considerable loss in cut wood, pulp
wood, posts, and poles.
Commissioner Baird places the total
tosses at less than $1,000,000 in both1
peninsulas, although early figures had
made it as high as $2,000,000. Approx-
niately 50,000 acres were burned over,
t is stated.
Within two years the blackenedT
areas will again be green with growing
?)ush and trees and, according to some
iuthorities, in another couple of yearst
.ill constituteanother firestrap, un-
less the state takes measures to keep1
dying and dead undergrowth cleared1
-way.N
It is said that sparks from locomo-
tives, camp fires and fires started by
men clearing ground are responsiblel
n most cases for Michigan's annual
plague of woods conflagrations.l
OLD PHI KAPPA PSI HOUSE
IN PROCESS OF DEMOLITION
Demolition of the old Phi KappaT
Psi fraternity house at the corner ofr
Hill street and Washtenaw avenue hap
begun in order that work may soont
start on the construction of a newf
home. The new residence of the fra-
ternity will be built along old EnglishI
lines, of brick construction with slate
roofing.
Unusual plans for housing the mem-
bers have been adopted, as each man
will have an individual study andC
sleeping room. The ground floor di-
mensions of the house will be 135 by
40 feet. The old home of the frater-
nity is one of the landmarks of Ann9
Arbor.a
GREAT BRITAIN FEARS U. S. f
COMPETITION IN SHIPPINGa

interesting of the summer entertain-
ments. Talent was drawn from the
four quariers of the globe, there being
three Japanese, one Hindu, one native
of France, one Russian and one South
African on the -program.
Dean E. H. Kraus of the Summer
school introduced Ralph Carsn, '17,
who was master of ceremonies for the
evening. In his opening talk Mr. Car-
son gave some interesting informa-
tion about the Cosmopolitan club and
pointed out the international character
of the organization.
U. of U. Club Largest
"The Cosmopolitan club of the Un-
iversity of Michigan is the largest or-
ganization of its kind in the country
and numbers among its members the
natives of 36 countries. Our program
tonight, the League of Nations vaude-
ville, is an example and proof of the
international character of the club,"
said Mr. Carson.
All of the arangements for the en-
tertainment were made by the mem-
bers of the club under the direction of
A. Elkind, '20, the president.
,Japanese Music Givein
The first number on the seven-act
program was the rendition on the Jap-
:anese flute of several Japanese musical
selections by M. Uyehara of the School
of Music,
Mr. Evert Hackes then gave a talk
on Swiss yodeling, which he demon-
strated with several examples.
P. Kwok next rendered several sel-
ections of Chinese music on a Chinese
mandolin and followed them with oth-
er selections on a Chinese flute.
Several mandolin solos were then
given by A. Elkind, accompanied on
the piano and guitar by F. Daniels. El-
kind rendered "Ai nostri monti" and
"Il balen del suo sorriso," from "II
Trovatore."
Mrs. Helen lDyason Sings
Mrs. Helen Dyason, accompanied by
Mrs. F. Snith on the piano, sang sev-
eral soprano solos.
The history of the Japanese science
of jiu jitsu was fully given and ex-
plained by an expert in the art. S.
Katsuizumi. After he had made an ex-
planation of jiu jitsu, several mats
were rolled out on the stage and with
M. Miura as partner, Katsuizumi pro-
ceeded to give an exhibition of the well
known art.
DR. A. C. HALL, REGISTRAR,
LEAVES FOR SUMMER VACATION
Dr. A. G. Hall, registrar of the Uni-
versity, left recently for Cornell,
Mich., where he will spend his sum-
mer vacation. Dr. Hall expects to be
gone for about two months before re-
turning to begin work of preparation
for the fall registration.
LIEUT.-COM. T. M. OSBORNE
DONS GARB OF ENLSTED MAN
New York, July 11. - Lieutenant-
Commander Thomas Mott Osborne,
ommanding the naval prison at
Portsmouth, N. H., is now aboard the
U. S. S. North Dakota as a commonI
gob in order to get first hand inform-
ation regarding a sailor's life at sea.,
His purpose in doing so is to discoveri
for himself if conditions aboard ship
are such that a man would rather be
sent to the naval prison than stay in'
the fleet, as one sailor claimed when1

Washington, July 11. - Steamship
lines to Hamburg and Bremen, Ger-
many, wil be established as soon as
cargoes are available at American
ports, the United States shipping
board announced today.
i The lines will operate from Bos-
ton, New York, Baltimore and Phila-
delphia, one vessel to be allocated to
the line between Philadelphia and
Hamburg at once. For the shipment
of cotton, lines also will be started
from southern ports.
Trade between the United States and
Germany will be resumed immediate-
,y, Acting Secretary of State Polk an-
nounced.
Blanket Licenses
Mr. Polk said blanket licenses would
be issued, but that dyes,' chemicals
sand potash would be excepted. Con-
trol over trade in these commodities
will be exercised by the reparation
commission, under terms of the peace
treaty.
Germany will need immediately
,from the United States, according to
department of commerce officials,
large quantities of cotton, copper, ker-
osene oil and iucreased amounts of
fodstuffs and wearing apparel.
Closed Snce 1914
Trade with Germany has been at a
standstill virtually since August,
1914. Grmany's total imports from
the United States in 191 amounted to
$407,246,000. Cotton, copper, raw fur
skins and kerosene oils were the prin-
cpal commodities, together with food-
stuffs, wheat being the largest of the
latter. In that year Germany import-
ed $109,960,000 worth of cotton, $69,-
8991,000 of copper, $15,827,000 of skins,
$15,612,000 of kerosene oils and $39,-
243,00 of wheat.
American imports from Germany
consisted principally of toys, potash,
dyestuffs, chemicals and drugs, deli-
cate precision, instruments, pottery,
porcelains and graniteware.
Cut off from German supplies, Amer-
ican firms began the manufacture of
,many commodities previously obtained.
from Germany, and legislation to pro-
tect these industries from "dumping"
by German firms is now pending in
congress.
PUMP STEERE FARM
WATER INTO MAINS
Water from the Steere farm wells!
owned by the city has been pumped
at intervals into the eastern mains of
the city for some time, it has become
known. It was for the purpose of
making tests of this source of supply
that the water was turned into the
mains, and as further tests are to be
made, officials of theuwaterdepart-
ment decline to give out any informa-
tion concerning the investigations.
For the purpose of determining the
fullest capacity of the new plant east
of the city, the officials wish to make
the tests as complete as possible dur-
ing the present season.
DIRECTORS OF BANK ACT AS
PALL BEARERS AT FUNERAL
Members of the board of directors
of the Farmers and Mechanics bank
will act as pall bearers at the funeral
of their business associate, Jacob'
Schultz, this afternoon. Services will
be held at the residence of the family
at 110 South Ingalls street, at 2:30

Men and women wishing to
work on the Wolverine should see
the city editor any afternoon be-
tween 2 and 4 o'clock. There are
a few geed positions open, es-
pecially for those who hope to
gain experience for work on The
Daily in the fall.
WAR FORTUNES BOOST,
PRICES OF ANTIQUES
OLD FURNITURE AND ART WORKS
IN GREAT DEMAND WITH
ENGLISHMEN
London, June 15.-(Correspondence)
-The enormous fortunes made in
England during the war are responsi-
ble for record breaking prices which
sellers of antiques of every kind are
realizing in London auction-rooms, in
the opinion of men who have long
been close to the trade. The whole
country is being searched for treas-
ures of all kinds which find ready
sale at prices which hitherto have 1een
paid only by foreigners.
A mysterious portrait which recent-
ly appeared in one auction room and
'was said by some one to have been
by Franz Hals quickly brought $60,000,
although its authenticity has even now
not been established. A Reynolds por-
trait which to the present had not at-
tracted much attention was easily sold
for $70,000, and pictures by much less-
er lights brought phenomenal prices.
Artistic Furniture in Demand
Artistic furniture is in even more
demand. Six Chippendale Gothic
chairs recently sold at a country sale
for $5,125, in spite of the fact that
modern artists are copying this par-
ticular design with marked success and
only the trained expert can detect the
difference. At another country sale
two Chippendale tables brought $1,600
and a Chippendale cabinet $6,250.
Sheraton furniture is not so pop-
ular, excellent tables going as low as
$100. An old harpsichord in a Wil-
liam and Mary case sold for $2,500, and
a grandfather's clock gave its fortu-
nate owner $600 in spite of the fact
that the clock had probably ceased to
tick more than 100 years ago.
Illuminated Manuscripts
Illuminated manuscripts also are in
demand, and as in the case of furni-
ture, record prices are being obtain-
ed. Letters of David Garrick, and a
few by his wife, to noted persons of
their time, caused spirited bidding, but
were withdrawn and will be offered
again.
Efforts to trace the purchasers of
some of the choicest offerings have
revealed the presence in the market of
persons who never before paid any
attention to antiques. Many of them
are persons who accumulated large
fortunes during the war, and 'now
that they have acquired fine houses
have set out, with the aid of experts,
to give them the ancient touch requir-
ed by good taste.
TRAFFICKING IN WAR SAVINGS
STAMPS TO BE INVESTIGATED

WOLVERINE TRYOUTS

Several Acts Already Arranged; Tr
outs To Take Place Tuesday
Afternoon
Plans for the 1919 Joyshow to It
given Aug. 7 in Hill auditorium, ar
being made. This entertainment wi
resemble the Band bounce and Spo
light in that the students of the Un:
versity will participate in the s1v
putting on vaudeville skits, such a
song acts, dance turns, and one ac
comedy stunts.
Some acts have already been secur
ed, and further tryouts will be con
ducted by Vernon S. Foote, '21, gtcera
chairman, at 5 o'clock Tuesday after
noon in the assembly room of the Un
ion for the purpose of obtaining eigh
or nine high class entertainers.
The Joyshow will be under the sup
ervision of the Michigan Union. Al
proceeds from the entertainment wil
go to the benefit of the American .Un
iversity Union in Paris.
\ Dean Kraus Sanctions Show °
Edward H. Kraus, dean of the Sum
mer session, has given his sanction t
the enterprise, saying: "Among u
this summer are a large number o
teachers who are taking advanee
work at the University during thei
vacation. The Joyshow will affori
these men and women a glimpse of th
non-academic side of the University
The impression which they will carr
back with them will be the impressioi
made by a Summer session which is
has it should be, more nearly like th
winter term."
The large attendance at the Sum
mer session, including an unusua
number of regular students, is respon
sible for this - effort to inject into th
Summer term some of the regular en
thusiasm and school spirit. Promotor
of this enterprise have been successfu
in finding many entertainers who have
been in previous productions of Uni
versity talent.
Moore to Direct Music
Earl V. Moor, of the Universit:
School of Music, whose work in th
recent Michigan Union opera met witl
much success, has assumed the direc
ation of the music. He expects to organ
ize an orchestra which. he thinks wil
equal the standard set by previous pro
ductions promoted by the Union
since there is such an abundance o
musical talent here this summer.
There is a possibility that E. Morti
mer Shuter,' director of "Come On
Dad" may come to Ann Arbor thit
summer in time to direct the show. Mr
Shuter, it is known, intends to retur
here in the near future to begin worl
on the 1920 opera. w
Heath's Statement
Homer Heath, general secretary p
the Union, says of the proposed enter
tainment: "One of the most desirabl
results that come out of the campu
activities which characterize the wint
er session, is a strong influence towar
the unification of the student body
The shows and games, of which w
have such a plentiful supply during
the winter, have been lacking in the
Summer session. The result has bee
a more or less heterogeneous studen
body. It is hoped that a show give
by students of the Summer session wil
help to remedy this condition."
Margaret K. Jewell, '20, of the Car
goyle art staff will design a poster fo
adveritsing use.
1. W. W. PLAN CITY OF OWN;
WE HOPE THIY STAY TIER
Spokane, July 11.-An I. W. W. cit
on the desert off Wilson Creek, south
west of Spokane, to be the nationalI
W. W. capital, is being planned here.
It is said actual constructions. is

awaiting the release of the I. W. W
leader, Bill Haywood and his arriva
here. It will be a colony largely on
the Mormon settlement plan. Every-
thing will be co-operative and it i
expected 1. W. W. from all over the
nation .will migrate to it,
The 1. W. W. plan to boycott al

5

July 14
p. m.- Measures of Musical Talent
(Illustrated by the Graphophone),
Miss Hazel M. Stanton, of the State
University of Iowa.

July 14
5 p. m.-Practicing Democracy in
School Administration, Mr. T. J.
Knapp, superintendent of schools,
Highland Park, Mich.
8 p. m.-The Hospital and the Com-
munity, Dr. C. G. Parnall.
July 16,b
5 p. m.-Education and Patriotism,
Dean J. R. Effinger.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the
University School of Music (Hill
auditorium).
July 17
5 p. m.-Niagara Falls and Vicinity
(Illustrated); Prof. I. D. Scott.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 18
2:30 p. m.-Excursion to Niagara Falls
under the direction of Mr. F. W.

o'clock.
Mr. Schultz, one of the city's prom-
inent business men, died suddenly
Thursday noon at his home having
been subject during the past week to
an attack of acute indigestion.

London, July 11.-American com-
petition in the shipping trade between
North and South America, and with
South Africa gnd Australia was the
subject of discussion in the house of
commons today when Robert Houston,
member for Liverpool, called attention
to the great increase in Amerlican
shipbuilding and the close competition
that would result.
" The discussion -brought out that all
possible steps were being. taken by
the ministry 'of shipping to put'English
ships back on a pre-war basis and in-
sure the maintenance of essential im-

asking to be sent to Portsmouth.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Huron and Division Streets
SUNDAY, JULY 13, 1919
10:30 A. M.-Leonard A. Barret speaks, "Back to Christ."
11:45 A. M.-Prof. W. D. Henderson, "The Church and
the World Crisis."
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Evening Service.:

New York, July 11. - The war sav-
ings committee announced today that
the operations of unscrupulous traf-
fickers in thrift and war savings
stamps were being investigated with a
view to prosecution. The investiga-
tion is being carried on under in-
structions from the treasury depart-
ment. The committee said that many
persons fail to realize that war sav-
ings stamps can be redeemed at any
postoffice for their face value, plus in-
terest.

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