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July 11, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-11

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CONTINUED FAJR
TODAY'

LL

WnI urrinr~

AT YOUR Doc
THREE TIMES
A WEER

i

. X. No. 7. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1919. PRICE THREE OE

ROWNING, ELIOT
RPSNTJWIN TRUE LIGHT

THE
WHO

TWO ENGLISH WRITERS
HAVE UNDERSTOOD
HEBREWS

BLACK FLY MAKES.
1919 APPEARANCE
The first issue of The Black Fly, the
organ of the Camp Davis students, has
been published and sent out to the
subscribers. The first number con-
tains a directory of all the students,
an editorial column, sketches of Camp
Davis life, and a humor column, call-
ed "Fly Bites" because of the obnox-
iousness of the flies at the camp.
The editorial staff of the paper is as
follows: Gacious W. Francis, editor;
"Energy" Taylor, business manager;
"Jack" Jacka, assistant editor; "Al"
Kunze, assistant business manager;
"Bates" Russel, art editor and devil;
"Pete" Langenhan, sports editor.
The Black Fly is published on blue
print paper and to the editor falls the
task of printing the paper. This is'
the eighth year of publication.

ABBI ASKS FOR MORE
TOLERANT ATTITUDE
ism Born Because ofi Anti-Semitic
Feeling, Claims Doctor
Wolsey

Imagine, if you can, a typical cam-
pus character, a man who wore cordu.
roy trousers, who made Tau Beta Pi;
Griffins, Vulcans, Web and Flange,
and Owls, who was business manager
of the Michigan Technic, and who wor
his class numerals in football. Such'
a man was our hero.
He was a popular man on the cam-
pus. He was elected a member of the
Student council in spite of his popu-
larity, however, and served as its
treasurer one semester and as its vice-
president the next. It was while he
was vice-president of the council that
the United States entered the war.
What a problem he faced then none
of us can realize who have not been
members of the Student council. Could
he serve the country better as vice-
president of the council or in the
ranks? Sacrificing all thought of the

r
1
a
3

Notice of His Commission Delayed,
lichigander Toils Year as Private

100 WOMEN ATTEND
TEA AT NEWBERRY

good of the student body, our hero en-
listed, giving his real name, H. A.
Taylor, '17E, to the recruiting sargeant.
Taylor signed up with the 23rd Eng-
ineers, and, being modest, said noth-
ing about the vice-presidency of the
council. As a result, he was still a
private when his outfit went overseas.
Tobey toiled on in France for a year,
and 365 days as an engineer is a long
time. At the end of the twelvemonth
he had acquired many blisters and a

Robert Browning and George Eliot
are the two English writers who have
really understood' the Jew, and have
presented him in his true light, ac-
cording to Rabbi Wolsey, in the last of
the three lectures given under the au-
spices of the Jewish Chatauqua so-
ciety Thursday afternoon.
"Browning and George Eliot are two
of the greatest minds that ever came
to earth," said the rabbi, and he went
op to say that he considered Browning
the greatest poet of all time.
"In his treatment of the Jew," con-
tinued Dr. Wolsey, "Browning is sup-
erior to Shakespeare. He presents
the Jew not as a grasping, hardened
villian, but as a thinker, who is trying
to solve the world's problems. In this
respect Browning understands the Jew
even better than he understands him-
self."',

t
e
e
I
_I
t
A
r

Czechs-Champion
Globe 'Trotters
Veterans of the A. E. F. thought
'they were taking a long trip when
they crossed the Atlantic. Some of
them were partially disillusioned on
reaching Newport News after their re-

iturn trip from France
several thousand New
on their way home.
The New Zealanders
the trip from France to]
where they rested for
fore embarking again

when they met
Zealand troops
had just made
Newport News,
two weeks be-
for home, an-

"Holy Cross Day" Described
In "Holy Cross Day," which Rabbi
Wolsey described somewhat in detail,
Browning treats the Jew most sym-
pathetically, and represents him as re-
fusing to- accept any other faith than
his own. "It was believed in those days
and the belief exists even today,-that
the Jew holds to his faith because of
stubbornness, that he persists in
heresy and does not want to come into
the 'light.' This is not true. The JewG
believes1i ,11Frligion and holds to it
because he thinks the principles worth
while holding on to. Browning under-
stands this, and presents it faithfully
in his poem.
"A lady at one of my lectures once
said that the reason her people did not
like the Jews was because they did not
accept Jesus. My answer to her was,
'How can we accept that which is al-
ready ours? Jesus spoke in the Jew-
ish tongue, his philosophy and thought
was Jewish, and he talked to a Jewish
people.' It is in the interpretation of
Jesus that the two faiths differ."
Pays Tribute to George Elliot
In approaching George Eliot, Dr.
Wolsey paid tribute to one of the out-
standing figures in all literature, and
said that her presentation of the Jew
was finer than any Jew himself could
have dared to make. The character of
Mordecai, in "Daniel Deronda," is a
classic creation, and worthy of com-
parison with any figure in the Old
Testament.
"And George Eliot knew her sub-
ject," said the rabbi. "In the whole
work there is not one single academic'
error. This was because she studied
the Jew, not only in his past literature
and history, but in actual life. She
went to the Jewish districts, and into
the homes. And because she knew of
what she was writing, she presents the
real Jew as no other author has done.
When Jew Is Most a Jew
"The Jew is most a Jew when he,
lives in the spirit of the prophets, and
gives utterance to the high thoughtsI
that move him. George Eliot under-j
stood this, and her Mordecai is a pro-
phet as of old. This presentation of;
the Jew is more true than any othera
writer in English literature has given
us. I have not only admiration, but
reverence for the whole representa-
"-Li "

other two weeks or more on the wa-
ter.
Now comes the record trip of the
war. Several thousand Czecho-Slovak
troops recently landed in San Fran-
teisco. Starting out in southeastern
Europe, these soldiers fought their
way through hostile forces in Russia,
battled their way across Siberia, and
:took ship across the Pacific to Amer-
ica.
The Czecho-Slovaks will cross the
United States to Newport News, where
they will embark for Fance, con-i
pleting their round the world trip by
rail. On their return they will find
their new country freed by the re-
cent peace treaty.
Throughoutthe war the Czecho-
Slovak nation was little more than a
government, having no territory it
could call its own. The seat of the
government was in Paris, where
France gave the officials of the new
republic quarters until their country
should be formally freed by the peace
conference from Austrian dominion.
The Czecho-Slovak troops were re-
viewed by the commander of Camp
Kearny, California, on their arrival.
M. A. C. EXTENSION
WORK CURTAILED
East Lansing, July 10.-When the
lower house of the United States con-
gress cut the agricultural extension
bill $1,000,000 the Michigan Agricul-
tural college lost $30,000 from its us-
ual annual fund for extension. Also
the failure of the national congress
to pass the appropriation bill imme-
.diately puts a further curtailment on
the extension work of the institution.
The original bill called for an ap-
propriation of $2,500,000 but the bill
as it now stands calls for only $1,500,-
000. The bill is now ready to be sub-
mitted to both houses, but just when
the lawmakers will get around to act
on the measure is doubtful.
This cut in the appropriation will
be felt immediately as the college'sj
fund for extension work is said to be'
nearly exhausted. The Lever law will
also prevent the college from sending
out demonstration trains until the
railroads revert to private owner-
ship.
THREE VISITORS' NIGHTS
DRAW MANY TO OBSERVATORY

UNI!ERSITY R EC EITVE S
BEQUEST OF 51900
MISS FRANCES A. LAWTON LEAVES
FUND FOR FELLOWSHIP IN
ASTRONOMY ,
The University of Michigan has re-,
ceived a bequest of $10,000 from the
late Miss Frances A. Lawton, of Jack-
son, whose death occurred in June. She:
had stipulated that $6,000 of the fund,
should be used to found a fellowship.
in astronomy, the income from this,
sum to be paid to a student appointed
by the University. The remaining,
$4,000 is to be used to secure the pub-
lication of the work done at the ob-
servatory or in some department of the
University, the department of astron-
omy always to have the preference.
Miss Lawton was a daughter of the
late Prof. U. W. Lawton, who was
much interested in astronomy, and,
the sister'of George King Lawton, who
was one of the astronomical staff at
the Naval Observatory at Washington
prior to his death in 1901.
The committee to distribute the'
money for both the fellowship and the
publication fund is to consist of the
president of the University, the dean
of the literary college and the senior'
professors of mathematics and as-
tronomy. In case no suitable &andi-
date for the astronomy fellowship is
found, the income is to be paid to a
candidate from the mathematical de-
partment until such time as an ap-
plicant from the astronomy depart-
ment appears.
LOUIS C. REIMANN, '17L,
TO BE CITY "Y" SECRETARY
Louis C. Reimann, '17L, will become
secretary of the Ann Arbor Y. M. C.
A. July 15, when the resignation of
Harold L. Westerman, present secre-
tary, takes effect.
Reimann has been general secre-
tary of the Washtenaw County Y. M.
C. A. for the past year. He is at
present one of the leaders at the
Camp Birkett Y. M. C. A. camp for
boys on Big Silver lake.
Reimann played tackle on the Michi-
gan football team in 1914 and 1915, an'
injury preventing further athletic com-
petition. He was prominent in Y. M.
C. A. work in the University.

top sergeancy.
Then, on June 11, 1919, came the
blow that taught Tobey that the stuff
about the immortality of the soul is
all bosh. After a year in the ranks,
during which time he had shoveled his
way across three-fourths of Sunny
France, Taylor learned that he had
been a lieutenant throughout the whole
period of his overseas service.
He learned of his commission when
he received notification that he had
been commissioned a first lieutenant.
In this communication he was address-
ed as a second lieutenant. Investigat-
ing, Taylor found that he had been first
commissioned in July, 1918, as a result
of examinations he had taken before
going overseas. He had never receiv-
ed notice of his first commission.
Taylor is now taking a course of
study at the University of Toulouse, in
southern France, where several thous-
and American soldiers of the A. E. F.
have been in attendance. He is mak-
ing a desperate attempt to spend all
of his back pay before leaving for the
States. Tobey is said to favor the Stu-
dent council over the army because the
former body notifies officers-elect
promptly, whereas-well, how would
you feel if you had been in Tobey's
shoes?
CLOSING Of BOARD NOT
TO AFFECT UNIVERSITY
DISCHARGED SOLDIERS WILL NOT
BE PREVENTED FROM COM-
ING HERE,
Closing down of the Detroit branch
of the federal board of education due
to lack of funds, will not in any way
interfere with the number of discharg-
ed soldiers who are coming to the
University next fall to complete their
education at the expense of the gov-
ernment. This is the opinon of Uni-
versity officials.
The order as sent out by the board
at Washington calls for closing some
of the branch offices, because of an
alleged failure of congress to sup-
ply the necessary amount of money,
but does not in any way affect the
program of the board towards pro-
viding for soldiers completing their
educations.
Some inconvenience, however, will
be caused by necessitating soldiers, de-
siring to benefit by the act, to go to
Chicago for examination instead of to
Detroit. Prominent Detroit citizens
are demanding of their congressmen
that the Detroit branch be reopened.
This agitation is resulting in the be-
,sieging of the department of labor and
the heads of the vocational depart-
ment for proper recognition of De-
troit.
As it is now understood, about 250
discharged soldiers are coming to
Michigan next fall at the expense of
'the government. They will be paid
$75 a month and an additional amount
for incidentals, such as tuition and
books.
PRESIDENT AND MRS. HUTCHINS
TO RECEIVE STUDENTS TODAY
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Mrs. Hutchins will receive students of
the Summer session from 5 to 6 o'clock
this afternoon in Alumni Memorial
hall, Representatives of the different
colleges will also be present to greet
the students.
This Young Lady Should Get a Man

Approximately 100 women of the
Summer session attended the tea given
Thursday afternoon at Helen Newber-
ry residence by the Women's league.
The students were received and wel-
comed by a tommittee composed of
Mesdames A. R. Crittenden, N. H.
Williams, H. A. Sanders, and W. A.
Frayer, and Misses Elliot, Hill, Butler,
and Potter.
Several occasions of a similar na-
ture are being planned by the league.
Meetings, the character of which will
be announced, will be held at 4 o'clock
every Thursday during the Summer
term.
The entertainment for next Thurs-
day will be given in Barbour gymnas-
ium and special features are promised
for the event. League memberswill
be admitted free of charge and their
guests upon payment of a small fee.
PRESIDENT ISCLOSES
TREATY DIFFICULTIES
WILSON, IN CONFERENCE WITH
SENATORS, MAKES EX-
PLANTIONS
Washington, July 10.-After conclud-
ing his address on the peace treaty be-
fore the senate, President Wilson this
afternoon went to his room near the
senate chamber, where he remained
nearly an hour receiving members of
congress and discussing the treaty
with many of them. Reasons actuat-
ing the peace conferees on many im-
portant subjects were said to have
been disclosed by the President.
While the president was thus en-
gaged, Republican leaders conferred in
the Republican cloak room. Those
attending included Senators Lodge,
Borah, Brandegee, Fall and lVtcCor-
mick. Nearly every Democratic senator
visited the President. Senator Ken-
yon, Iowa, was the only Republican
senator to call and he merely exchang-
ed greetings.
Senator's Suggestion1
One of the Democratic .senators aug-
gested to the President that the treaty
be -taken from the foreign relations,
committee and considered by the sen-
ate in committee of the whole. The
President, it was said, promised to,
consider this suggestion.-
,Several Democratic members of the
foreign relations committee said they
assured the President that the fight
both for the League of Nations andt
ratification of the treaty eventually
would be won.7
In discussing difficulties in negotiat-
ing the treaty, the President's visit-
ors brought up the German indemnity
settlement and the Shantung andi
Irish questions. Those who talked<
with the executive said he told them
he had urged that a definite indemnity1
be imposed upon Germany, but that het
yielded to the indeterminate plan
adopted to "help Premier Lloyd George
out of a hole."
Failure of Irish Committee
Regarding failure of the American
mission in behalf of Irish independence
to secure a hearing before the peace
conference, the President, according toE
his visitors, said the members of thet
mission had so thooughly identified
themselves with the revolutionary ele-
ment in Ireland before going to Paris,
that it became impossible for them tot
be received by the peace conference.
Acting Secretary Polk and Attorney
General Palmer, with Secretary Tum-
ulty, were present at the conference,
which was watched by a large crowd
of spectators in the hallway outside

the President's room.
The President laid the peace treaty
with Germany before the senate with-'
out attempting to explain its specific'
terms. His address, which required 401
minutes for delivery, was devoted al-
most wholly to the League of Nations.'
President's Claims
Following are some the statements
made by President Wilson in address-
ing the senate:
Statesmen at the peace conference
see in the League of Nations the hope;
of the world.
The world must be swept clear of;
every power that could renew terror-
ism.
The compromises which were ac-1
cepted as inevitable, nowhere cut to
the heart any principle.a
It was everywhere conceded that1
(Continued on Page Four)

BETSY BARBOUR HOUSE
W I L L ACCOMODATE 8
Original Gift of $100,000 Proves I
adequate for Building of
Women's Home
Excavation for the new Betsy Bar
bour dormitory began'Thursday mor
ing when the huge steam shovel o
the P. J. Snyder company started wor
on the women's tennis courts behin
West hall. It is expected that th
excavation will be completed withi
10 days, and that structural work wil
then commence.
The plans call for a structure prac
tically similar to Helen Newberry res
idence, except that the new build
ing will be constructed of tapestr:
brick instead of white stucco., Thi;
brick is the standard which the Uni
versity has adopted and resemblei
that used in the construction of Hil
auditorium, the Natural Science bullw
ing, and the Library.
West hall will be torn down event
ually, but owing to the large attend
ance looked for next fall, the old land
mark will remain for the next year a
least. The dormitory will then fac
on State street, having a large law
like that of Helen Newberry resl
dence.
Not to Be Ready for Year
Although work has begun on the
dormitory, it will not be complete
and ready for use for a year or twi
because of insufficient funds. A sun
of $100,000 was donated by the Hon
Levi Barbour, former regent of the
University, some years ago, at which
time it was thought the donatio
would prove adequate. Rising prices
however, have made the amount in
sufficient.
The outer frame of the dormitory
will be built, and the $40,000 whicl
will be necessary to finish it will bi
secured some time in the next tw(
years. As much of the building wil
be completed as is possible with th
money on hand.
Third Girls' Dormitory
Betsy Barbour, house will be the
third girls' residence at Michigan, the
other two being the Martha Cook and
Helen Newberry dormitories which to
gether house about 200 girls. The new
residence will care for about 85.
Mr. Barbour, whose contributior
made possible this building, has mad
other donations to the University, giv
ing largely to the construction of Bar-
bour gymnasium. 'He has also es
tablished a $100,000 scholarship fun
for Oriental women students.
COSMOPOLITANS TO
PERFORM TONIGHI
Cosmopolitan night, when the for-
eign students of the University give
their annual entertainment for th
amusement of the attendants at Sum-
mer school, will be held at 8 o'cloc
this evening in University hall.
The entertainment this year promis
es to surpass in popularity any previ
ous productions of the club, inasmuch
as the program is to be on much th
same order as that of the All-Natioi
Hullabaloo, the show given during th
regular- session.
In the latter' performance the for
eign students took a large part, rend
ering skits characteristic of their na
tive countries.
TWENTY MEN SIGN UP FOR
SUMMER TENNIS TOURNAMIEN'
Approximately 20 men -have signe
up for the summer tennis tourney U

be held in the near future under the
auspices of the Athletic association
Entry lists are posted in Waterinai
gymnasium, Moe's athletis shop, and a
The Wolverine office, and it is hopes
that many more will sign up befor
the end of the week.
The entrance fee is 25 cents, and al
money accruing from this source wil
be used to purchase prizes for the con
test

WORK BEGINS ON
EXCAVA-TION FC
NEW DORMITOI
STEAM SHOVEL STARTS DESTI
TION OF TENNIS
COURTS

The vision of Mordecai, as described
George Eliot, was pointed out by
bbi Wolsey to have been taken up
the Zionists, for whom he has the
hest respect, but whose opinions
fer from his own. He does not be-
ve that the great majority of the
vs would care to return to Palestine,
I thinks that their place is in the
rld. Anti-Semitic feeling has given
,th to Zionism, he asserted. The
ws would never have dreamed of
ng back if the world had taken

Visitors' nights at the observatory
the first three days of this week have
proved exceedingly popular, according
to Sunmer session officials. Only a
few tickets, these for the later hours,
were not disposed of. Each night
three groups of 50 were taken through
the observatory and made acquainted
with the place.
The first 50 started their tour of in-
spection at 8:30, the second at 9:30
and the third at 10:30 o'clock. During
the stay of 45 minutes the visitors
were given an opportunity to look atj
the moon and were told of the work-
ings of the observatory.

WHAT'S GOING ON
July 11
5 p. m.-Reception by the President
for the students of the Summer ses-
sion (Alumni Memorial hall).
8 p. m.-Cosmopolitan night, by the
Cosmopolitan club (University hall).
July 14
5 p. m.-The Racial Heritage of the
War, Prof. A. F. Shull.
July 15
5 p. m.-Practicing Democracy in
School Administration, Mr. T. J.
Knapp, superintendent of schools,
Highland Park, Mich.
8 p. m.-The Hospital and the Com-
munity, Dr. C. G. Parnall.
July 16
5 p. m.-Education and Patriotism,
Dean J. R. Effinger.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the
University School of Music (Hill
auditorium).

-Newton, Mass., July 10.-The pret-
tiest girl in La Sell seminary was
proclaimed its best breadmaker at the
commencement recently. Miss Ethel
A. Ramage of 'St. Johnsbury, Vt.,
holds both of thiese honors. She was
pronounced the school beauty when she
was crowned queen of the May and
honored for her culinary skill when
she was awarded a small gold loaf for
baking the best bread.

Id had been made

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