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July 01, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-01

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THE WOLVERINE

fq
flicts there is a point beyond which a material. It is at once a politi
victory would be to the victor as dis- philosophy and a religion. It is sr
astrous as to the deefated. In every ual as well as temporal. It appea
struggle for existence, co-operation the bosoms as well as to the bus
wins more than rivalry or triumph. of humanity. If It could be sum
However beneficial economic group up in one word that word woul
consciousness has been in times past 'Justice.'
or may be when wisely led in the fu- "As educators we ask for better
ture, it will cease to be beneficial better training and higher respec
whenever a group loses consciousness teachers, better school houses in w
of the higher claims of the community to teach, better equpment for to
in which they live. ing, better playgrounds for recrea
"The group consciousness of women better conditions, not only in the se

I

aeeking redress from further continu-:
ance of ancient wrongs should haveI
a consideration all its own. It is not
a narrow issue like a community con-1
sciousness or a race consciousness or
an economic consciousness. It in-
cludes the whole orb of life. tI is men-{
tal and moral as well as physical and

but in the home, for children that
to be taught. We wish school trus
with broad culture and high .sj
tions. We wish communities infi
with a fuller and clearer underst;
ing of the importance of education
of the supreme value of the sere
of those that devote their lives to

THE "Y" INN

-:-

at Lane Hall

GOOD HOME COOKED FOOD

ATTRACTIVE DINING ROOM

BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CAMPUS

Work Begun on Spanish Monument
Madrid, June.30.-Work has begun
n a monument to be placed here in
emory of Spanish sailors killed at
antiago (Cuba) and Cavite (Philip-
ne islands) during the Spanish-
merican war.
MAJESTIC
MAJESTIC ORCIESTRA Nightly--All Shows Sunday
July 2-House rented to the "Grotto."
Not open to the public.
" Jumly 5-4-S'
"Au.t+ on of Souis"

TEACHERS LECTURE ON
EDUAINLPROBLEMS
(Continued from page four)
their country, have become investors
in its securities," stated J. I3. Puel-
icher, director of savings, seventh fed-
eral district, Milwaukee, speaking on
"The Thrift Lesson of the War." "In
many states, lessons in thrift have be-
come a part of the school curriculum.
In this way, much has been done to
counteract the undermining tendency
ever present with great prosperity.
"The necessities of war have thught
to'the adult and to the child, lessons in
thrift and conservation far exceeding
any 'easonable expectation. The im-
petus, gained should now be fostered
and directed into permanent channels
so that these valuable lessons of the
war may become a part of our na-1
tional life,"

out. it.' When thus put on a material- :of little moment. The second is more
istic basis, industry condemned higher lasting and more momentous, but as
education as a hindrance to financial =we are striving to rid our people of
success. The arrangement of educa- their racial differences and of their
tion as a failure in efficiency had old world customs, to the end that all
grown bitter when the great war ex- may merge into a common conscious-
ploded most o* our pet theories- ness of American citizenship, we can
greatly lessening the value of 'effi- have no responsibility with rospect to
ciency' and opening the way for new any sort of race consciousness among
attitudes toward the aim and value us, save that of teaching, preaching
of education. and practicing genuine Americanism,
"We are just entering the third phase first, last and all the time.

Lunch and Dinner $5.00 per week, or separate meals
Lunch-11 :45 to 1:00-40 cents

Dinner-5:30 to 6:30-50 cents

Service Table d'Hote

'

-'

W UERTH THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00. 8:30, 10:00
Tues-We-1-2--George Walsh In "Put-
ting One Over" with a Lloyd Comedy,
"Spring Fever" an dtheylatest News
Weekly. Remember always a "Kino-
gram" on these days of each week,
Thurs- Fr-3-4---Oliva Thonmas in "To-
Ton" with a two-reelh L-Ko Comedy,
"All Jazzed Up."
FRIDAY-4th-SPECIAL-REPORTS BY
ROUNDS OF THE WILLARD-DEMP-
SEY FIGHT,
Sat -5 - Helene Chadwick in "Caleb
Piper's Girl" with a News and Com-
edy.
ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Tues-ed-1-2-Corinne Griffith in "Thin
Ice" with "THE SILENT MYSTERY"
N§ 7.
Thurs-3-Lila Lee in "Such a Little
Pirate"(ret.) with a News and Comedy.,
Fri-4-John Barrymore in "The Test of
Honor," Also News and Comedy, and
RETURNS BY ROUNDS OF THE WIL-
LARD-DlEM1SEY FIG HT.°
Sat-5-William S. Hart in "The Border
Wireless" with a News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-6-7-Montagu Love in "The
Hand Invisibe" with a Mutt & Jeff
Cartoon Comedy, and Ford Weekly.

11

If

"There have been two great impulses
toward education in the United States.
First the desire for personal culture-j
an inheritance from the aristocratic
ideal of Europe. The second impulse
came with the sudden commercial ex-
pansion of our great Middle Western
cities,"said Miss Eleanor N. Adams,
president Oxford College for Women,
speaking on "Increasing Group Con-
sciousness Among Women as Regards
Education." "The lower school urged
High School on its puipls as a means
of getting on in the world. The High
Sc'hool sent its pupils to college with
the motto, 'I can make more moAey
with a college education than with-
Shows at 3:00; 7:00; 8:30
Phones:
Theatre, 2g6-M Mgr's Res., 2316-M
Tue-Wed-1-2-Doris Kenyon in "Twi-
light;" Star Comedy, "Taking Things
Easy" and News Weekly.
Thu-Fri--3-4-Alice Brady in "The In-
destructible Wife;" Christie Comedy,
"A Rustic Romeo" and Ford Weekly.
Sat-5-May Allison in "Castles in the
Air;" "You Know Me Al" Comedy and
Bruce Scenic.

of our educational impulses in this
country-intensive training for good
citizenship and service to society. This
latter ideal has not sprung as a
Phoenix from the ashes of the old sys-
tem, for its foundations have been
carefully laid by many earnest work-
ers who only lacked the support of
public opinion in the rearing of their
superstructure. As a rule the educa-
tion of any individual terminates with
the necessity to go to work; the prac-
tical value of his education is of pass-
ing moment. This haphazard method
cannot keep up with the constant
change in intellectual, industrial and
civic needs. A certain group conscious-
ness among women of these unsatis-
factory conditions are observable as
far back as the formation of the Kin-
dergarten association, followed in
rapid siccession by mothers' clubs,
parent-teachers' associations and
other agencies which promote intel-;
ligent co-operation between teacher
and home. All these efforts have been
stabilized by the activities of the Fed-
eration of Women's clubs."
"The greatest obstacle to securing9
life giving fresh air to school children
is the belief on the part of the busi-
ness men on the school board and the
engineers and janitors in the schools
that artiicial ventilation is a Heaven
sent institution! When these indi-
viduals are converted, and teachers
made health enthusiasts by sound
courses in the normal schools on child
health and feeding: when parents
learn that stale overheated air is a
poison both at school aid at home, and
we all work on the principle that,
health habits are the fundamentals of
education-then it will no longer be
necessary for a child to ask as one
did in Chicago-'Say, Doctor, how
sick's a feller got to be to get into this
here open air school?" said Miss Alice1
H. Wood, of the Elizabeth McCormick
fund, Chicago, speaking on "A Practic-
al Demonstration in Health Educa-
ion"
"The lessons of the draft showed us
that the homes and the schools of the
nation had not been successful in pro-
ducing a vigorous young manhood 100
per cent eff*lent for national defense.
The homes and the schools must.now
combine to improve their human pro-
duct,"
"There are many forms of group con-
sciousness among the people of our
time. There is a community conscious-
ness of local interests as distinct from
those of other communities. There is
among immigrants and their descend-
ants a racial consciousness of peculiar
customs and creeds; there is a class
consciouness among groups of work-
Ingmen of their economic solidarity in
conflict with capitalism. There is a
consciousness among an increasing
class of women of the essential unity
of their rights as women to readjust
the existing social order so far as it
is confused by any injustice surviving
from a bygone age," stated Miss Mar-
garet S. McNaught, commissioner of
elementary schools, Saqramento, Cal.,
in her speech on "Responsibility in
Group Consciousness."1
"The group consciousness of com-
munities and of races need not concern
us long. We may dismiss the first be-
cause one American community is so
much like another that any conflict of

"There remain the two forms of
group consciousness that have a claim
upon our attention, our study and our
energies; the laborers' consciousness
that they are entitled to a larger
share of the profits of their labor than
they have had in times past or have
now; and the consciousness of wom-
en that they are entitled to a larger
share in the world's work, the world's
rewards and the world's honors.
"The consciousness of opposing eco-
nomic interests between labor and
capital is the outcome of the change
that has come over the industrial con-
ditions of the people of the United
States in the developments of the past
50 years."
* * *
"Great gains have come to labor and
through labor to the nation, as a re-
sult of the class consciousness of
workingmen. In the old ays, it was
only here and there that some man
more strong, more skillful, or with
larger business capacity than his com-
rades rose by good fortune from the
ranks of the ill-paid hired men to the
ranks of the employing class; but now
by unity of effort and class co-opera-
tion, all workingmen have advanced
to a higher standard of living than was
possible 50 years ago.
"Today, however, this class con-
sciousness menaces the prosperity of
civilization. Wisely led it has the
Spotency of becoming 'one of the highest
contructive forces mankind has ever
exerted; but ill-directed it is porten-
tous of industrial disturbance, civil
discord and ruin.
"As education did not cause this class
consciousness, neither can it set it
aside. Our responsibility in connec-
tion with it therefore begins and ends
with our duty as educators to con-
tinually remind both the contending
'groups of their solidarity with the gen-
eral interests of the community and of
the nation. That solidarity is the
base upon which rests alike the pros-
perity of both capital and labor. Each
side must be brought to understand
beyond all-doubting that in their con-

DORIS KENYON
Supported by FRANK MILLS-a U. of M. Man
-IN-
"TWILIGHT"
By VINGIE E. ROE
A DELIGHTFUL LOVE STORY OF TWO YOUNG FOLKS
P. S. Harrison says in The Motion Picture News:-"You can safely
call Doris Kenyon the most beautiful girl on the screen."
DO YOU AGREE WITH HIM?

Thursday and Friday
,i ALICE BRADY

- n n-

"TH E INDESTRUCTIBLE

ALICE BRADY -

WIFE"

Coming-Tom Moore in "The City of
Comrades"'
GRUEN WATCHES
SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEATHER GOODS

1I

a w
--.s. - -,.,- +- -

Last Times Today
WM# S. HART
e#reed of Men"
VILLAG SMIThY" Sennett Comedy
THURSDAY FRIDAY, AND SATURDAY
e c fSouls"
Tw o Years in Turkish Harems

I

ALARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
HALLER C. FULLER

STATE STREET JEWELERS

L a

SUMMER

TERM

JULY 1 TO AUG. 22

CLASSES IN

GREGG SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITilG

BOOKKEEPING

Enroll now

PENMANSHIP

Matinees, all seats
Nights, lower floor
Last six rows

f " " 0

- -" " 0
o . " 0 "

25c
35c
50c
35c
25c

HAMILTON BUSINESS.

11

COLLEGE

balcony

. . " "
" 0 0 " 0"

Phone 342-R

State and William Sts.

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