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August 19, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-19

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the~

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
)ffice Hours: Managing Editor-r :oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-1:oo to 2:00 o'clock daily except Saturday
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith and notices of events will be published in The
verine at the discretion of the Editor, it left at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
:ss the writer incloses postage.
The Wolverine doesnot necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehlbert....................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 2227-i1
J. Ellsworth Robinson. ..........Business Manager
Phone 2414 or 1505f
sser M. Campbell...........City Editor Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
on Marx...............Associate Editor Martha Guernsey...........Women's -Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr..*...................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. 'Merz J. E. Beretta Robert W. Taylor
H. H. Ieth Samuel Lamport Edgar L. Rice
Julia Lockwood
BUSINESS STAFF
P. Schneider Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1919.
THE RETURN

L

her Hand-

M I D S U

There are nine million eggs in cold
storage in Detroit and we are willing
to wager anything that the parents
of all of 'em are dead.
"Well," says Henry, "six cents is six
cents and that means one more added,
to the output tomorrow."
Says Omar to Lucky Strike
Soon we depart to leave this school
and all
Its week-end pleasures that do so en-
thrall
Us. But, damn, September soon comesI
round,
And we have to say we'll see you in
the fall.
A headline in the Free Press says
"Feud Victim's Body Riddled." That
shows what one of those cheap cars
will do to a man.

Summer school students who plan
to enter the dental college next year
are urged to communicate immediately
with Dean Marcus L. Ward. Already
about 85 applications have been re-
ceived for admission to the freshman
class and since only 90 students will
be taken, any persons interested
should communicate with the dean's
office at once.
The course for the coming year will
be the same as during the past. Men
entering next fall will be required to
,ake four years and in addition one
Summer school.
Beginning with the year 1921, the
course is to be lengthened to five
years.

E R

Fj

BOOK SALE
OUR TABLES AND COUN~TERS ARE FAIRLY GROANING

There is something very natural in the way we anticipate returning.
er leaving any experience-even though we may have almost hated it at
time--we look back, and that experience seems filled with strange
rm and beauty. We like to go back.
A college experience is a small reflection of the world; it is filled with
al, interesting things. Let us not forget that fact when we leave it to
round ourselves with the brilliance of another life-the'froth of sum-
r pleasures. When we merely drift down channels of our own creating
us not allow the waves to breed destruction with their whispers of our
desires. And when a broad, white highroad stretches before us, luring
farther and farther away, let us not forget the lanes and side paths where
ch of the truth can be learned.
We know a man who leaves his medical practice once every three years
d comes from a distant western city to continue his research at Michi-
1. At the same time he snatches a new glimpse of the surround-
ps he has learned to love. That, after all, is an example of the efficient
y to live. Why not always take time to do the thing we will like to re-
mber having done?
There is a certain spirit of- freedom and bravado about facing life.
ends await us; but let us think of friends as the little wheels in a bigj
,chinery. They are precious little ,wheels, controlling a delicate mechan-
a without which we could not get along. Perhaps, some day,-after we
ve learned -more-we will know definitely that they are the most im-
tant of all.
Or, perhaps, a great work seems already given to us. This task we
ould think of as the big wheel. It must exist before the machinery is
plete, but much should be understood before we attempt its construc-
n. It will be the outcome of work well done on smaller parts, the com-
site of past successes. We should learn well the science of the inter-
diate wheels before tackling the completion.
Let us return to the University,-to Michigan. Let us boost Michigan
our actions and by our words, so that others will see the wisdom of a
tain depth instead of sup'erficial froth. Let us-all of us-sometime
ne back.
BUILDING THE ATHENS OF TODAY
"At the present day America has her choice as to whether she will be
Carthage or an Athens in- the future world." So writes President Lowell
Harvard university in an appeal for contributions through the Harvard
dowment Fund Committee. "Carthage was a great commercial power.
e has left not one remnant of thought of any kind. Another maritime
wer, not so large, not so powerful, has stamped itself upon the civiliza-
n in such a way that we cannot think apart from the thoughts of
hens. "We can make ourselves simply a great commercial nation, or
can make ourselves one of the great leaders of thought in the world.
rough our colleges it is possible, and essential that we put forth our
eat intellectual power, if we are truly to be leaders of the world.
"Did it ever occur to you," he continues, "that the most enduring insti-
tions man has founded are his universities? Why? Because the uni-
rsity really contributes to the highest in civilization and contributes
mething that is eternal."
Vindicating the rights of America -to be called a future Athens, Pres-
ent Lowll speaks of the war: "The New World has had cast upon it by
e war many new responsibilities. Our young men formerly have gone
road to be educated, but it is now for us to educate them at home and
ake ourselves not only a center of industry, not only the greatest indus-
al nation in the world, but the greatest intellecual nation in the world.
it is to be done, it must be done with the aid of and mainly by means of
r universities."
In a very practical way President Lowell then points out what is
sential for the building of the Athens of today. Primary in impor-
nce is increased pay for professors. "What a professor wants is not a
rtune, but enough to live comfortably in the scale of life in which a
ofessor ought to live, and he wants to educate his children as highly
lie was educated himself, and he wants to provide for his old age.
"And in another way the question appears. A public man, at Com-
encement last June, said that if you underpay any body of men in the
mmnunity they will be discontented, and the class that you cannot afford
have discontented is the class that teaches your youth.
"We must have sufficient teachers to enable the greatest among them
give up their classes for a year or two and write books, to make per-
anent what they know, and not let their knowledge die witl them.
"We are at a crisis in the history of our country, where the question to
j determined is not whether we are in danger from a foreign power, but
hether the American people will rise to the height which they can rise
and be one of the greatest peoples which the world has ever known."
This agitation toward paying professors more liberally and thus mak-
g the teaching profession more attractive is daily gaining momentum.
le country at large, as well as the, teachers themselves, is beginning to
cognize the fact that inadequate and unfair salaries will not attract into
e profession men of the .highest ability. The problem has, indeed, be-
me one of national importance and, as President Lowell states, one
aich concerns our position among nations.

Pullng the Sheep's Fur Over the
Judge's Optics
A. A. U. circles are deeply stirred by
a dispute over the awards in a re-
cent Detroit River swim. Miss May-
belle Smart was declared the winner
in the 100-yard event for women, but
the spectators and competitors assert
that four other swimmers finished
ahead of her. They claim that the
judges were so busy looking at May-
belle that they didn't see the other
contestants. Miss Smart's bathing suit
only slightly impeded her progress in
the water. Needless to say all of the
judges were of male persuasion. The
explanation given by the officials was
that while others may have been
spedier, Miss Smart unquestionably
showed the best form in the race.
-D. A. C. News.
Jever go to a ball game
And sit next to one of those squirrels
Who knows just what
Cobb should have done then and why
And that Bush is going back
And that if Jennings had put in
Whathisname
instead of Whoisit
It would have been different
And he knew Walter Johnson
When he used to play in tennis shoes
And he tells you
Who's going to win the game
And why
And thentwhen his dope
Turns out all wrong
He says I told you so
Anyway
You can't treat that kind of a bird
Too hard
Can you?
We Have Some Things to Be Thank-
ful For
Lots of the boys may come back
with French spiece(*) and the habit
of saying "Je vous aime" to the gels
over here, but none as yet have
brought back the custom of osculating
each other on the cheek.
(*) Plural of spouse.
We are now open to suggestions as
to what Hen will do with the six
coppers. Somebody said it will buy
him a coke with a war tax and some-
one else said that he could get a good
Cinco with it.
Jever notice
That a bolshevist
Standing on a
Soapbox
And spouting
Isn't usually living
Up to his
Platform?
H.W.

COAL SHORTAGE CAUSES GRAIN
CROPS IN AUSTRIA TO ROT
Vienna, Aug. 18.-Banner crops are
reported through Jugo-Slavia, the
Ukraine, Austria, Bohemia and soviet
Russia. Much grain, however, is
rotting in Austria and elsewhere be-
cause of lack of coal for harvesting
machinery.
Read The Wolverine for Campus
news.
Pay your subscription.

WITH BARGAINS
in books of Education, History, Economics, Mathematics, Chemistry,
etc. Come early and bring your basket.
Wahr's University Bookstores
For Traveling AnywhereAnytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
4Nickels Arcade)

1,

- .1

ARROW
T,9OY qIAILORED
SOFT COLLARS
FIT WELL-WASH EASILY
Cluett, Peabody , Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y.

Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing:-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
opingĀ§-r no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State anu our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550.000.00
Res'urces .........$4,000,000.00

Two Doors from
Hill Auditorium

LYNDON & COMPANY

University Avenue

f -- -

I

Northwest 'or. Mein &, Huron.
707 North University Ave.

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE

I

FOR

Absolutely..
The Coolest Place in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. MAIN

THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:1o a.
m., and hourly to 8:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Ca---7:48
a. i., and every hoursto 9:48 M. (Ex-
presses make local stops we.st L _ .bor.)
Local Cars East Boun--6:oo a. ,.5 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. it., 1o:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, r r :45 1. in., 1s :za
a. m., r :ro a. m, and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti. X
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:20,p. M.

BUESCHER SAXOPHONES
Bb Soprano Saxophone, triple sliver-plated ................$105.00
Eb Alto Saxophone, triple silver-plated.............. .. .. 125.00
C-Melody Saxophone, triple silver-plated ................. ....$185.00
Bb Tenor Saxophone, triple silver-plated.......... ............$145.00
Bb Biiss Saxophone, triple silver-plated.......................$220.00
SEE AND TRY THESE BEAUTIFUL INSTRUMENTS AT
SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SOUTH MAIN STREET

Bath

in g
THE TWO PIECE K
THE WHITE BELT

Suits

WE HAVE

IND WITH

1 I

GEO. J. MOE,

"'Sport

Shop"

OFFICIAL PRINTERS

to the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

and by authority

OF ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

THE A NN ARBOR DRESS

RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT
PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARD ST.
OUR WORK IS LIKE OUR PHONE

NO. I

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