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August 08, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-08-08

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t be Lolvedrne
Official student newspaper for the
summer session of the University of
Michigan. Issued Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday afternoons.
Advertising rates-Furnished upon ap-
plication to the business manager.
Office hours: Managing editor, 1:00 to
2:00 o'clock; business manager, 11
to 12 o'clock, daily.
Address, The Wolverine, Press Build-
ing, Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Russell Baines-Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 319
Agnes L. Abele-Business Manager
Phone 960 or 1892
Editorial
James C. J. Martin........
. .....Detachment Editor
Louise A. Irish ...... Women's Editor
Paul A. Shinkman ........ Dramatics
Cordelle Kemper ............Music
Reporters
Mary Rhodes Naomi Bradley
N. A. Gleason Herbert Hobart
Business Assistants
William Wachs Warren C. Parmenter
THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1918
MIDNIGHT DISCUSSIONS
It has been said that Michigan men
are good "tea talkers," which trans-
lated from the campus vernacular
means that they are able to hold their
own in the little informal discussions
or "tea talks," held nearly every nigit
in nearly every fraternity or rooming
bouse. Every college man is familar
with them. One man long about mid-
night, or whenever the spirit moves
him, will drop into his neighbor's room
and the two will start talking. Others
in the house hearing the conversation,
and fearing to miss sopething, join the
two, and soon there is a little gath-
ering, casually, or heatedly, interested
in the discussion.
The range of subjects is limited only
by human knowledge. One minute it
may be the best methods of catching
trout, and then the next jump over to
an argument on socialism. More often,
however, the subject matter is not of
a particularly instructive nature, and
undoubtedly if a dictagraph record
could be made of a representative
number of these midnight talks much
of the matter would be found to be
questionable. They form good med-
iums for the circulation of many jokes
and compositions of the more vulgar
character.
These talks have their places, and
much good can result from them if
the conversation and discussion be led
in the right channels. Their social
character alone would be sufficient ex-
cuse for their existence, for many
close friends are made within their
circles and a better understanding of
human nature gained, but that does
not concern us here. The greatest
source of value is in the opportunity
for intellectual enlightment.
Every man is the better off for an
ability to argue. It sharpens the in-
tellect and makes for clear thinking,
and there is always a certain amount
of Information assimilated. There are
no better opportunities for informal
arguments than these little gather-
ings. Often also there are men in
the crowd that have realgknowledge
about the subject, for college gather-

ings are always cosmopolitan, with
men in them from many localities and
with varied interests. The clash of
intellect against intellect brings out
the best in each man participating,
and the result may be often of worth-
while value to hearers.
What is needed is someone to steer
the talk into channels that will lead
somewhere, and amount to something.
It is no trick at all, for all that is
necessary is a question of observation
to attract the attention of the crowd
and start discussion, especially if the
preceding conversation' has been of
a trival or inconsequentional nature.

In your little midnight "tea talks"
try it. Don't try to be profound of
highbrow, for that will strike a death
knell to the little group. Just try to
keep to a subject that has possibilities
for enlightment-and be clean.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Aug. 8, 5 p. m.- Democracy versus
Autocracy. Prof. W. A. Frayer.
8 p. m.-Educational Motion Pictures.
Aug. 9, 5 p. m.-What is the Function
of Mathematics in Education? Prof.
W. B. Ford.
8 p. m.-Illustrated Manuscripts of
the Bible from Spain (Illustrated).
Prof. H. A. Sanders.
Aug. 12, 5 p. m.-The Popular Ballad.
Assist. Prof. W. R. Humphreys.
Aug. 13, 5 p. m.-Impressions of Au-
stralia. Prof. T. C. Trueblood.
8 p. m.-Cathedrals and Chateaux of
Northern France. Asst. Prof. Fiske
Kimball.
Aug. 14, 5 p. m.-Picture Books of the
Ancient Greeks Pro. C. Bonner.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill au-
ditorium.)
Aug. 15, 5 p. mi.- The Pan-German
League and America. Prof. Wallace
Natestein of the University of Minne-
sota.
8 p. in-Miscellaneous Readings. Class
in Interpretative Reading. (Uni-
versity hal),
Aug. 16, 5 p. m.-Psychology and Ad-
vertising (Illustrated). Dr. H. F.
Adams.
8 p. m.-Mexico and Her People (Il-
lustrated). Regent J. E. Beal.
Aug. 20, 8 p. m.-Recital, The class in
Shakespearean reading. (Universi-
ty hall.)
MEMBERS OF DETACHMENT PAID
IN RECORD BREAKING TIME
Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock
at the University branch of the Ann
Arbor Savings bank, 725 of the soldiers
were paid off. The time required for
paying the men was 79 minutes, mak-
ing a little more than 10 men a minute,
which was the record forkthe last pay-
ment. Both times the work was all
done from one window. Because of
the weather the officers allowed the
men to fall out of line. However, the
officers were not the only considerat(
gentlemen as George Moe thought he
would do the boys a good turn by
sprinkling off in front ofdthe bank
and cooling it. Mr. Moe had the dight
stuff but the wrong place. The men
were more interested in having their
bodies cool than the bricks, so they
took the hose away from him and made
it a temporary fountain.

r
t

THE WOLVERINE
AIR MAIL SERVICE FAILED Fischer Party at the Packard every LOST-Black seal scarf on ro
ONLY TWO TIMES IN JULY Friday evening.-Adv. tween Lakeland and Ann
Return to Wolverine office
Washington, Aug. 8.-Air mail ser- D960. Reward.
iceDancing at the Armory every Sat-
phia an NewYor wa intrrutedurday evening. Fisher's orchestra.-
phia, and Nee Y itorkw s itrupedads usrb o h ovr
only two times during July .on ac -__Ad __. ___ubs_____________r__T____________ r_
count of weather conditions, It was
announced by Second Assistnat Post
master General Praeger. Out of 108' adge Kenned
possible flights, niney-eight perfect IN
trips were made. Forced landingsfI
were made but eight times during the
month, in which 11,855 miles were cov- j The Service Stai
ered.
ered. ____________A Narrative AbsolutE
WANTED - Number of students to r te ASreen
work for board between end of sum- New tv the Screen
mer school and fall term. Call
Gaulet, 2639-W.
G e WNot a war play-n bai
scenes-But there is a we

Special Values
in
Writing Papers
and
Correspondence Cards
Siieehan & Co.
C. W. Graham, Prop.

derful story of a wonde
girl who sends away a w
derful boy to make th
wonderful world to liw
Madge Kenned
IN A
PAGE KEMiMEDW Dramatic Rc
Goldwyn FCi-tres Sfa.
ARCADE THEATRI
TODAY AND TOMORROW--20c

F
i

L 4
A LINEN OR VOILE -DRESS,
IS EXPENSIVE WHEN BOUGHT READY MADE
P urchase the Material Saturday
AND THE COST IS PRACTICALLY NEGLIGIBLE
The Linens r
$1.50 colored linen, in pink and green,
45 inches wide . . .

MC INERNEY, GRIDIRON STAR,
BADLY WOUNDED IN FRANCE

Notre Dame, Ind., Aug. 8. - Lieut.
Arnold McInerney of South Bend, star
,tackle of the Notre Dame 1915-1916
football teams, wes severely wounded
in France, according to a cablegram
received by his parents. Lieutenant
McInerney was one of the first Notre n
Dame men to receive a commission
at Fort Harrison and in December was
sent to France. At the close of the
1918 football season he was a Chi-
cago Tribune selection for all western
honors,
OFFICIAL UNIFORMS FOR L
CIVILIAN WAR WORKERS
Washington, Aug. 8.-Uniforms for
representatives of civilian organiza-
tions engaged in camp activities have
been authorized by the secretary of
war, it has been announced today, and
each organization has been requested
to adopt a suitable uniform, distinctly
different from the army uniform, and
to submit it for approval.
To learn , 'iritinawelli
requires olose applioatiol j
A t giwriter and free jf
instruction book from
0.D.Morrill. 322 S. States ~
will do the rest.

$1.25 colored linen, in rose, blue, green, 98c
and lavendar, 36 inches wide
69c natural colored linen,
36 inches wide . . .C
85c natural colored linen,
36 inches wide c
Trhe Voiles-
39c voiles, in plain, flowered and
plaid effects, 36 inches wide .9C
50c voiles, in a wide range of plain
colors, and indistinct patternings .9C
98c and $1.00 voiles, in beautiful
summer shades and patterns

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