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July 14, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wuerth Theatre
IMatnees a,3:3o.Nights5630,8, :3
Satrdays Sundays-Contsonuous
Sat-14-Gladys iulette in "Pots and
Pans Peggy."
Sun-Moh-r,16-Lou eHuff and Jack
iskforanky Feorul "Bng
too: foelofater." o lfoo

Theloovcrinel

i

_.._._

B ooooe of aMa.
W rsFi- 1 oBese Bgariscale i
he Snarl."
Orpheum Theatre
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Soundays-Continuous
Sat o aneo Wilbur in "The Single
Code,
S Mo-5-6-Wilfred Lucas in
"Hands Up
Toos-i7Noo daoadge in "Fifty-
fifty" Rbood
Wed-1- Douglas Fairbanks in "The
Americano. Rebooked. Fee. sc.
Tors to 9 oFannie Ward in "Un-
Sat 2-Florence a Badie in "ThoeWo-
an0i0 White.
ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo; 6:30; 8:oo; 9:30
5c Unless Otherwise Specified
Phone 296-M
-Thurs-2-Maiam Cooper in "The Silent
toe" andChristeComedy
Fr13V ola Daa nLady Barnacle,
ond]DrewComoedy oots.
Sat fidoh Sto ey and Antono Mor-
en in "Captain of the Grey orse
Troop," and Part III of "The Seo-
ret0Ki-gdooo"
Moo o atly Williams in "The Ne-
er-Do-Well." (Ret.)
We have both the inclination and
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Savmgs Bank
INCORPORATED 1869
Capital and Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue
Open ALL Summer
TUTTLE'S
Lunch Room
LUNCHES, SODAS
AND TOBACCO
338 SO. STATE ST.
Developing, 19O Prints, 3o, 4c, o
8 HOUR SERVICE
KODAK FINISHING
Arcade Floral Shop - "Kodak Florist"
Nickels Arcade Opp. Sub-PostalStation
Phone 6000
CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES
Open AS Summer
TRY GEORGE'S CHOP SUEY
WAI KING LOO
314S. State St. Phone 1244-M
HUSTON BROS.
BILLIARDS AND BOWLING
CIGARS AND CANDY
"We Try to Treat You Right"
STUDENT SETENCED TO ONE
YEAR FOR NOT REGISTERING
Max Frocht, a student at the Uni-
versity of Michigan, who refused to
register, was sentenced yesterday to
one, year in the Detroit house of cor-
rection with several other slackers by
the United States federal jury now
in session at Detroit.
Several Ann Arbor school officials
were called to Detroit to testify in
the case.

Four U. of W. Students Appointed
Madison, Wis., July 13.-Four stu-
dents from the University of Wiscon-
sin have been appointed assistant pay-
masters in the United States navy after
a competitive examination.

I

The official student newspaper for
the University of Michigan summer
session. Published by the students, on
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday af-
ternoons. Twenty-five issues.
Advertising rates-Furnished upon ap-
plication to the business manager.
Subscriptions and ads taken at Quar-
ry's and University Avenue Phar-
macy.
Office Hours: Managing editor, 1:00
to 2:00 daily; business manager0
1:00 to 2:00 daily. Phone 960 or
2414.
Address, The Wolverine, Press Build-
ing, Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Leonard W. Nieter-Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 1855
Bernard Wehl-Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2413-R
Reporters
Marion Rood H. J. Burtis
. W. Wood J. L. Stadeker
M. G. Hedin L. Kuschinski
Mary Rhoades D. K. Middlebrook
Business Staff
William Le Fevre Circulation Mgr.
Assistants
Maurice Klein B. F. Fullerton
Georgiana Pockman
SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1917
Issue Editor-James C. J. Martin
AT THE COUNTRY'S SERVICE
Michigan's war time courses not
only signify that the University is do-
ing its utmost to assist the nation in
its crisis, but that it is also carrying
ahead the traditional patriotism of the
state in all periods of warfare, that of
unusual patriotic assistance, be it
men or means.
The new courses, introduced for the
first time. embrace almost every ac-
tivity that is of invaluable aid both at
the front and at home. The three mil-
itary courses will give the students
the rudiments of the science of war-
fare and fit them for responsible po-
sitions. Few schools in the country
have such able and efficient instruc-
tors in military branches as has Mich-
igan, and that can hardly be regarded
as an idle boast.
In addition to these strictly military
courses, other branches of work al-
most as important are now being giv-
en. The course in civil and military
railroads consists of an actual study
of construction under war conditions.
The automobile study also involves a
close analysis of the adaptibility of
the automobile to military service and
field requirements.
Not only have sch courses been in-
troduced for the men, but suitable
studies have been instituted for the
women of the University. Courses in
nursing, dietetics, Red Cross work,
and household economics have been
added to the regular list of summer
work.
Thus it can be seen, that Michigan
is doing all that is within her means
to lend the country as much as it can
during the crisis. The providing of
adequate courses, fitting, men for ser-
vice in the field or increasing the na-
tion's productive power, is a feature
that deserves the highest commenda-
tion.
Kalamazoo Normal Holds Meeting
Members of the Kalamazoo Normal
club will hold their first meeting of
the summer session at 7:30 o'clock
Saturday night in Lane halt. All stu-

dents who have at any time attended
Western Normal are requested to be
present.
Visits Boys at Training Station
Dr. C. B. Charles Vibbert of the
philosophy department left Thursday
for the Great Lakes training station
to visit the Michigan men at the camp.
Dr. Vibbert will be gone for several
days.

.

Unitarian Church
State and Huron Streets
SUNDAY 10:30
SUBJECT
WELLS' NEW BOOK
"160, THE INVISIBLE KING"
The new faith which the war brings to
Mr. H. G. Wells and its relation to the
philosophy of Prof. William James.

I

Mr. DOuglas preaches e
at 10:30 tomorrown
at the
C ngregational Church
on
"Self-Co ntro l
Student Writes The Wolverine Urging
Games with Other Universities for
All-Campus Nine
To the Editor, The Wolverine:-
I noted with interest the story on
summer baseball that appeared in the
official summer school paper last
Thursday. If I am permitted to take
up some of your space, I will try and
give you some comment and a few
practical suggestions on the subject.
Summer baseball at Michigan is j
what the majority of the students de-
sire, and it is almost deplorable that
there are no outside teams on the
schedule. There is not reason why
this University should not have a
baseball team, during the summer ses-
sion, that can whip any other nine in
Michigan.
Perhaps some student who has not
sch n targue tat tiemtendaebos
the real reason why the University
can not hope to cope with any honors
in this line. This is untrue because
a number of the students attending
school in the summer time are born
players. All they need is a little pac-
tice, something to maintain this in-
terest, namely, compbtition with other
college teams.
Then too, a number of the men who
worked on the Varsity during the
spring are registered in this session.
With them in the line-up the raw re-
cruits can easily pick up the rudi-
ments of the game and become good
ball men.
Another person may say that there
is no interest displayed. To that in-
dividual I will request him to take
a walk around Ann Arbor and se
how many students play "rabbit ball
or catch during the early hours of the
evening. If these men could be reach-
ed I am confident that many of them
would be willing to sign up or come
to the practices.
I can see no reason whatever why
Michigan can not play any of the out-
side teams. There are plenty of base-
ball nines in this state to make ar-
rangements with.
The expenses, in the way of bats,
balls and bases could be furnished by
the athletic officials. The other items
would be supplied by the players them-
selves. This plan is being adopted
by Wisconsi this summer and from
all authentic reports, it is working
effectively.
The possibility of getting a match
with Wisconsin could also be probed.
Wisconsin possesses three nines and.
they are anxious to compete with oth-
er teams.
A STUDENT.
Michigan N. G. May Go to Waco, Tex.
Latest reports show that the Michi-
gan N. G. has been assigned to Waco,
Texas, one of the concentration camps
for tle national guard troops, by the
militia bureau, if approved by Major
General Bliss.

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS
We're already to serve you.-Onr stock of
T E XT BO OK S
is complete.
Second-hand Books in great nombers at greatly reduced prices,
UNIVERSITYWA H RS BOOKSTORE
C OOL I N G DRINKS
AT OUR FOUNTAIN
THE BEST
SERVICE
An Arbor
Make Our Store Your Store This Summer!
COMPLEITE STOCK
Watches - Jewelry - Silverware
Fine Repairing of Watches and Jewelry
EYE GLASSES
We do our own ense Grinding, enabli g us to give you prompt service.
HA L L ER&FULLERState St. Jelvelers

THE ANN ARBOR PRESS
Printers to the University of Michigan
and Student Publications

PHOINO1

_I41

IN OUR OWN
PRESS BLDG., MAYNARD ST.

'1

CLASSIFIED
WANTED-Two violin and piano play-
ers for orchestra. Phone 1487.
LOST, Strayed or Stolen -- One
log slide rule, probably in gas lab-
oratory of Chemistry building. Call
1328 Hardy.
TO REFINED party, a nicely furnished
room in private family; board may
be had if desired. Phone 681-M.
LOST--Thursday a. m., on Packard-
Huron car or between Packardand
Hill on State St., gold watch in
leather bracelet; large S engraved
on back. Finder please call 2093-J.
14-17
INSTRUCTION in French by native
teacher. 1471-M. 723 S. Thayer.
Wisconsin Students Commence Tennis
Madison, Wis., July 13.-Annual ten-
nis tournaments, singles and doubles
will commence tomorrow and last un-
til July 28. A large number have
signed up for the events, and arrange-
ments to play other than university
teams may be made, if these prove to
be a success.

MISS M. CRANS
LICENSED CHIROPODIST
Will be here One Day only on
'Tuesday, July 17, 1917
Reserve your time.
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard
707 N. University. Tel. 2964
FORSYTHE, '04, ELECTED PRIN-
CIPAL OF A. A. MIGt SCHOOL
L. L. Forsythe, a graduate of the
University of Michigan in 1904, was
unanimously elected principal of the
Ann Arbor high school at a salary of
$2,300 a year at the board of educa-
tion meeting Wednesday night. He
succeeds W. M. Aiken, who recently
resigned.
His career as a teacher has been
a long continued success and with the
accumulative experience of several
years in school work, Mr. Forsythe is
a well considered selection.

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