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July 14, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-07-14

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AT YOUR DOOR
3JIDA WEEJ

T ("

i FTHE O FAL
SUMMER NEWSPAPER

VOL. VIII. No. 8 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1917 !z{ICE FIVE CENTS

- i

22 STUDENTS CET
AL 'SIN WOK
Semester Report Shows Number of
Students That Merited All
Their Courses
FRESHMAN CLASS HEADS OTHERS
Keeping at par with all previous
scholarship records against innumer-
able odds, last semester's reports in
the various colleges shows that 22
students received all A's in their cour-
ses. In all probability the number
would have surpassed previous rec-
ords a little had it not been for the
intervention of war and the with--
drawal of many students with good
records'
The freshman class led the upper
classes in the number of students plac-
ed on the' honor roll, 10 of their class-
mates meriting all their work. The
junior class came a close second with
eight on the list.
Those who received all A's the last
semester are as follows: H. L. Cav-
erly, '19, Roberta Deam, '20, Howard
A. Dennee, '18, M. K. Ehlbert, '20, A.
W. Ehrlicher, '18, F. B. Fead, '20, R.
L. Green, '20, Andrew Haigh, '18, C.
R. Illick, 'ISM, A. H. Jacoby, '19,
Christina Kersey, '18, Marion Klinger,
'18, Julia Lockwood, '20, Carl W.
Neumann, '18, Lewis N. Osterman, '20,
Gerald P. Overton, '20, Mathilda
Schroeder, '17, Morris Stark, '20,
Houghton Taylor, '10, Gladys Vinter,
'20, Roger N. Walker, '19M, Marion
Wilson, '18.
PRESIDENT GREETS
SUMMER STUDENTS
Summer Session Students Entertained
by Faculty at Memorial Hal
Yesterday
One of the -most notable events of
summer school occurred yesterday af-
ternoon when President Harry B.
Hutchins and the faculty entertained
the students of the 1917 summer ses-
sion at their annual reception
Promptly at 5 o'clock the receiving
line took its position at the lower end
of Memorial Hall and from then on
till 6 o'clock a continuous line passed
before it. In another part of the hall
refreshments were served at decorat-
ed tables.
Those in the receiving line were,
President Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs.
Hutchins, Dean Edward Kraus and
Mrs. Kraus, Dean Henry E. Bates and
Mrs. Bates, Miss Wells, Secretary L. A,
Hopkins, Professor H. R. Rankin and
Dean A. H. Lloyd.
PROFESSOR W. D. HENDERSON TO
GIVE LECTURE AT CONVENTION
Prof. W. D. Henderson of the physics
department and director of the Uni-
versity extension service, will deliver
a lecture on "How the University Can
Be of Service to the Municipalities of
the State" at a meeting of the mayors
and ex-mayors of municipalities of
Michigan at Grand Rapids on July 27.
The convention will be the nineteenth
annual gathering of the league. The
conference headquarters will be in
the lobby of the Pantlind hotel.

Will Present Four
Plays on Campus
Popular Shakespearian Players Re-
turn to Ann Arbor for
Two Days
Arrangements have been completed
by the English department with the
Elsie Herndon Kearns players for four
open-air performances on Friday and
Saturday of next week. Elsie Hern-
don Kearns, who has been the leading
lady in the original Ben Greet com-
pany for a number of years, will ap-
pear in the star roles.
Perhaps no entertainment has pro-
vided much interest to the people of
Ann Arbor as these out-door present-
ations of the plays of Shakespeare.
Added to the excellence of the cast,
the novelty and charm of their act-
ing in the open has made the com-
pany famous during their fifteen years
in America.
4. C. Somnes Adds Much to Cast
Miss Kearns will be supported by
George Carleton Somnes, interpreter,
director and producer of the company.
Besides acting in numerous plays, Mr.
Somnes has found time to study de-
signing. His principal achievement
is the costumes for "The Marriage of
Columbine," which opened at Charles
Hopkins' Punch and Judy Theatre;
the fancy dress costumes for "The
Hawk," produced at the Shubert
Theatre, New York, by Mr. Favers-
ham; the setting and dress for a Mir-
acle Play in London, and several in-
dividual costumes for Mr. Greet.
Apropos of his artistic equipmei.t,
a well-known college professor and
writer recently said: "I should feel
certain that any performance under
the entire direction of George Somnes
would be marked by grace and beauty.
as his own work is sure to be. In all
the six different parts in which I have
seen him, the voice, the diction and
the metrical rendering combine a fine
eye for effects in color and line, and
a sense of poetry unusual among any
actors."
GIVES GOOD RECITAL
I. K. Immel Presents Humor and
Pathos as Brought Out in "The
Servant of the House"
Mr. Robert K. Immel gave an im-
pressive reading of "The Servant in
the House" by Charles Grant Kennedy
to a large audience in University Hall.
After a brief synopsis of the play,
Mr. Immel read those parts of the sec-
ond, third, and fourth acts of "The
Servant in the House" in which Rob-
ert, the drain man, features. The full
humor and pathos of the situations
were brought out by a well modulated
voice and vivid presentation of char-
acter.

George Carleton Somnes, formerly
director and manager of the original
Ben Greet Players, who will appear
in the portrayal of the leading char-
acters in Shakespearian and Classical
plays to be given on the campus next
Friday and Saturday.
AVIAION COOPS MAKES
PLEA FOBCOLLEGE .MEN
Captain Owens Writes Letter to Dean
Cooley Stating Requirements;
Sends Application Blanks
Dean Mortimer H. Cooley, of the
engineering department, received a
letter yesterday from Captain R. I3.
Owens, of the Signal Officers' corps of
the U. S. Army, to the effect that men
are needed for the aviation sections
of that deparemeL of berice. The
requirements for this branch are ex-
ceptionally high as regards character,
physical conditions, and training, and
college men are especially desirable.
A brief extract of the letter in this
regard is as follows: "It is of utmost
importance that candidates posess
those fundamental qualities of char-
acter and mind essential to officer
of every grade in our army. Aviation
officers in particular must be young,
and as near as possible in perfect
physical condition, mentally alert, and
have at least a good general educa-
tion, preferably along mechanical
lines.
"The minimum age limit is set at 19
years and the maximum at 30 years.
Good possibilities for commissions are
available, and it is stated that a col-
lege degree is not absolutely essential,
though university men are preferred.
Those interested in the aviation
corps are-urged to secure blanks and
further information from Dean Cooley,
at his office in the engineering build-
ing.

Five Register For
Ambulance Places
Dr. L. P. Ball Sends Out Letters In
Order to Fill Opening in
Ambulance Corps
Five University students have al-
ready made application to Dr. L. P.
Hall for the ambulance corps vacan-
cies at Allentown. Pa., which must be
filled before long in order to keep the
Michigan divisions from being sep-
arated or filled with outsiders.
In addition to this at least 65 let-
ters were sent out to men who have
been considering the proposition or
who were unable to get into the divi-
sion when first organized. It is ex-
pected that a sufficient number of men
will answer the notices to fill the 27
places opened by the new war order
which increases the size of the divi-
sions from 36 to 45.
No definite statement as to when the
Michigan divisions will be mustered
into active service across the seas is
obtainable, but it is evident that a
considerable period of training is still
before them.
Those who are interested in the ser-
vice and desire more information in
regard to the openings at Allentown
are requested to get in touch with Dr.
L. P. Hall, phone 550-J, as soon as
possible. Just how long the places
will be left open to Michigan men is
a matter of conjecture, and interested
parties should enter their names at
once.
DIRECTORIES OUT
EARLY NEXT WEEK
Summer Session List of Students to
be Ready for Students in
Few Days
Summer school directories will
probably leave the printers next Mon-
day or Tuesday. Arrangements are
being made to have them distributed
through the bookstores on State
Street.
Wolverine subscribers can procure
a copy by refunding their subscrip-
tion receipt at the place of distribu-
tion. Any student who is not on the
subscription list can obtain a copy for
twenty-five cents.
In spite of the lower registration
more directories have been ordered
than last year. The book will be bound
with a cover not likely to become de-
lapidated in a short time.
Send Hospital Supplies to France
Six boxes containing hospital sup-
plies, surgical dressings and children's
clothing were sent to France yester-
day by the Red Cross under the di-
rection of Mrs. L. P. Hall.

PLAY FIRST CAME
REEK FROM TODAY
Baseball lans Materialize; Initial
Contest to be Played with
Ypsilanti Nine
MANY VETERANS NOW IN SCHOOL
"Play ba-a-a-all." will again be
heard at Ferry Field when the All-
Campus baseball team scoops 'em up
on the diamond next Saturday. The
plans formulated for making a team
a few nights ago have materialized
and the first battle with the Ypsilanti
Normal aggregation will be played on
Ferry Field at 3 o'clock next Saturday
afternoon.
The dope on the present All-Campus
team looms up bright since several of
Coach Lundgren's Varsity stars have
given out the news that their moth
perfumed suits are now at the dry
cleaners.
With the following galaxy of stars
for a neucleus the strength of the
team cannot be definitely determined
but it ought to be satisfactory enough
to tickle the palate of the most critical
baseball fan.
Good List of Veterans
"Bill" Niemann, Coach Lundgren's
midget outfielder and star batsman,
is ready to send the ball into IHoover's
plant to'be repolished. Also "Eddie"
Walsh, an outfielder, has been signed
up for the team. Then Dwyer, a pitch-
er in whom the freshman grounded
their hopes for this spring is ready
for duty. Ohlmacher, a Varsity pitch-
er, is stated to be on the mound for
the first game and with these two
twirlers prepared a pitcher's battle
is practically assured. A catcher of
stellar quality has been found in Ham-
mond, so the receiving end will be up
to standard,
Practice will be started early next
week as soon as enough men have
signed up for the team. All prospec-
tive candidates are requested to call
"Bill" Niemann, 343 or John Edmunds
at the Press Building, on Maynard
street.
Miltary Students Plan Games
Michigan's military stores course
have completed arrangements for put-
ting two teams on the diamond in the
immediate future. The Quartermasters
versus the Ordnance department team
is the latest elope concerning the
series of three games to be played by
the khaki boys.
24 ENROLLED AT
BIOLOGICAL CAMP
Large Number Pursue Studies at Sta-
tion Located at Douglas
Lake
This year's enrollment at the Bi-
ological station at Douglas lake num-
bers 24 students, which is a good num-
ber considering present conditions.
The ideal surroundings and the adapt-
ibility of the region to biological and
research work is said to account for
its popularity. Of the 24 students now
engaged in study at the station, 16 are
undergraduates and eight graduate

Student Bible Class
Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets
PROFESSOR W. D. HENDERSON, LEADER
Sunday, July 15: "The Probable Effect of the War on Christianity."

Class Meets Following Morning Service

EVERYBODY WELCOME

I I - Ijstdn .

Friday Aiternoo ANNUAL SUMMER SCHOOL E N G A G E M E N T SEAT SALE OPENS at 3P. M. at
TAMING OF THE SHREW ELSIE HERNDON KEARNS' and WAHR'S STATE ST. BOOK STORE
Friday EveningSaturday,;July Ith
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING GEORGE AND CONTINUES DAILY
- THEREAFTER AT 4:30
Saturday Afternoon .... IN .... A REDUCED RATE OF $2.50
MOLIERE'S LEARNED LADIES FOR THE 4 PERFORMANCES
Saturday Evening Shakespearean A DClassicalPlays GENERAL ADMISSION SOLD
THE WINTER'S TALE CAMPUS THEATRE JULY 20, 21 AT THE DOOR

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