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August 17, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1916-08-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Dr. Wile Urges State Eugenles Law
Dr. Udo J. Wile, professor of derma-
tology in the University. as chairman
of the eugenics committee of the
Michigan State Medical society, has
recently made a recommendation to
that society that the state legislature
pass a eugenics law. This law would
provide for the issuance of health cer-
tificates before marriage would be
permitted. It would also provide for
a court of appeal to consider special
cases not coming under the general
law.
Newberry Girls Announce Dance
A dance will be given Friday night
by the girls of Newberry Residence.
This will be the last dance for the
summer session.
Purchase Treaty Causes Investigation
Washington, Aug. 17. - Secretary
Lansing was asked today to appear
Friday before the senate foreign rela-
tions committee to answer questions
relating to the treaty for purchase of

TE WOLVERINE

_.

.. I

I

the Danish West Indies. The commit-
tee, at its first meeting to consider
the treaty, decided a personal ex-
planation from the secretary would be
necessary to satisfy some of the mem-
bers regarding details relating to
business concessions in the islands
and to the purchase price.
Welverine Corrects Misstatement
The Wolverine wishes to correct a
statement due to misinformation pub-
lishe.- in the Tuesday issue. Martha
Cook dormitory is the gift of the Cook
family of Hillsdale, and is a memorial
to Martha Cook.
FOR SALE-Half interest in student
firm of Hyde & Brede. Good op-
portunity for student to earn a part
of his expenses. H. J. Hyde, 1244
Brooklyn Ave., Detroit.
l4ptices and announcements for wo-
men should be telephoned to Marian
Wilson, 547:

",,Scenic* River Cruise
100 Mile Daylight Round Trip.-to Wallaceburg
Drop care-banish worry-come with us and be happy on the most wonderful one day journey on
thelakes .through windlg rivers,. swift channels, green shaded. wave washed shores. Interesting
Idisan vllager-thers variety each instant throughout the trip.
Real Romanc iStaunch Steamer
Thetatetusgh akeSt. Round Trip Fares 'bteocottiasturdysteame,
cir,.NU.s. ship Cattl.houg From Detroit of ample capacity for this route.
the Flat.. St. Chsar River. se Week Povided7ith7plentyotd
Calm(th lot c I7ul) nl " hirs tthreeggod decks.
ueatstetatel ad Days - S i Men's cabin on promenade
Thedarayentstoftdiscoverydayd tanta kda.
and settettt of this.Indian Holidays $1.00 serve-eltlunchcounter. Also
countrypresent coaatiual caMx good meals. family style. in
TIME TAULR (Daily except Mondays) Eastern Time
Leave Detroit . "0 A. M. . Leave Wa aceburg - 3:1 P.M.
Luo"Wlelpououaou"e'.32s18 P. M. Leavy Algerian - . 8:500 P. M.
Uvlkne . -1235 P.M. LeaveoWatpote Island -." .1 . .
Aive W1eulaesra - -200 P.M. Arriseatralt - - 20P . M.
*StospWaltoland signalonly. N, oatsengttaken tetween Der Ai nAlgoeuo.
DETROIT-WALLACEBURG STEAMSHIP LINE
Docks:-Detroit, Foot Randolph St., Algonac. White Star Dock. Walaceburg. D, & W. Dock
H..B. SMITH, Manager JOHN STEVENSON. Agent C. LEID!CH. Uptown Ticket, Agt.

FATHER OF CHARLES
B. WARREN DIES HERE
(Continued from Page One)
birth the family moved to Fenton-
ville and then to Flint, in 1851. He
was graduated from the Flint high
school in 1860, and in the fall of that
year he entered the literary depart-
ment of the University of Michigan.
He entered a camp of instruction soon
after the firing of Fort Sumter, and in
1862 he acted in the Company K, 23rd
Michigan Infantry. While at Bow-
ling Green, Ky., a commission reached
him for second lieutenant of Company
C, 27th Michigan Infantry. He at once
returned to this state to join his regi-
ment and then encamped at Ypsilanti.
Soon after the regiment left for Ken-
tucky, he was detailed to act as aid-
de-camp of a commander of a bri-
gade. He continued to serve in this
capacity until the close of the Vicks-
burg campaign, when illness compelled
him to retire. In the following Octo-
ber his resignation was accepted on
account of physical disabilities.
After regaining his health Robert
Warren entered the Law School of
the University of Michigan and grad-
uated in '66. He was a member of the
Zeta Psi. Folowing his graduation
he immediately entered the practice of
law in Flint. But a year later he en-
tered newspaper work, and since that
time he has continued active ik the
field of journalism. He purchased the
*Bay City Journal in 16, and two
years later made it a daily paper, the
first to be published in that city.
Since then he has been editor and
publisher of papers in Saginaw, Law-
rence, Decatur, Albion, Charlotte and
Ann Arbor. The Ann Arbor Times
was the last publication in which he
was active.
He was married December 21, 1865,
to Miss Carrie W. Beecher, of Flint.
Three children were born to them, one
of whom, William Bates, died at the
age of 13 in 1884.
SUFFERING SUFFS SET UP SWELL'
SPREAD. HUBBY FOOTS THE BILL
When Charles E. Hughes was in
Chicago this week, among the many
people who waited to see him were two
women members of the Progressive
party. They had a certain number of
questions upon which they wished Mr.
Hughes to declare himself more de
finitely than he had previously done.
All morning these two women waited
in hotel"lobbies, buttonholeing poli-
ticians until their conference with Mr.
Hughes about noon time.
Having successfully accomplished
their undertaking, the women decided
that they would stop being modern
women for a while and be parasite wo-
men. So they went to an expensive
restaurant and ordered on expensive
luncheon, far more expensive than
either could have afforded by herself
and they charged the luncheon to the
husband of one of the women. When
she presented the bill to her husband
that night, his only comment was that
he didn't object to an occasional par-
asitic spree, but thank goodness, she
wasnt that way all the time.
Calendar
THURSDAY, AUGUST 17
At Home-Mrs. E. L. Gates, Acting
Dean of Women, and the resident
students of Newberry residence, will
be at home to all University women,
at Newberry residence, 3-5.
Lecture-A Universal Law (Illusrat-

ed), Professor H. M. Randall, West
Lecture room, Physical laboratory,
5 p. m.
Educational Motion Pictures, Auditor-
ium, Natural Science building, 7 p. m.
Selected Readings from Tennyson, by
the class in Interpretative Reading,
under the direction of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister, University hall, .8 p. m.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 18.
Lecture-Growth and Development in
Relation to Physical Training, Dr.
G. A. May. At~itorium, Natural
Science Building, 5 p. m.
Lecture-Home Life of Wild Birds (Il-
lustrated.) Assistant Prof. R. W.
Hegner. Auditorium, Natural Sci-
ence building,$ p. m.

INDUSTRY AND TRADE ACTIVE
WITH BUT MEDIUM CROP YIELD
Industry and trade are active as
evidenced by the increase in building,
the great volume of sales in stocks,
greater activity in bonds, a heavy in-
crease in railroad earnings, and the
improvement of the foreign trade situ-
ation. The moderate crop yields with
the prospective European demands
have already caused a higher price
for cereals and cotton.
The reports from various sections
indicate the prospect of moderate
yields in crops. The Northwest has
been badly burt by rust and high
temperature. Estimates vary as to
the damage done, some indicating the
smallest crop in sixteen years. The
Canadian damage is estimated to he
considerably lighter. The winter
wheat harvest compares favorably
with last year's. Corn has been in-
jured in Missouri and Kansas by the
hot weather but in Nebraska and Okla-
homa prospects are much better.
Iowa promises the best results in the
middle west. Tobacco crops are gen-
erally good the country over. The
cotton crop begins to look better al-
though west of the Mississippi the
lack of rain has reduced the early
sanguine estimates.
Informal Dance at Newberry Residence
The Women's League will give an
informal reception at Newberry Res-
idence Thursday afternoon. All the
women in college are invited. As this
will be the last opportunity for the
girls to get acquainted, they are urged
to attend.

Suiiiier -School Books,
And Supplies
SHEEHAN'vS
Students' Bookstore
NEW MANAGEMENT

ERNEST L. HEITKAMP ADDRESSES
JOURNALISM CLASSES TUESDAY
Mr. Ernest L. Heltkamp, editorial
writer for the Detroit Free Press and
for a number of years foreign corres-
pondent in London and on the con-
tinent for leading American news-
papers, will speak to Professor White's
classes in journalism Tuesday after-
noon at I o'clock. The lecture will
be devoted largely to a discussion of
the training requisite to success in
editorial writing.
Though cloaked with the anonymity
characteristic of newspaper men, Mr.
Heitkamp has won plaudits for his
newspaper as the result of his com-
ments on the several phases of the war
in Europe. Me has been characteri-
zed by auoe as. the soundest war'critic'
of the middle west.
The lecture will be given in Room
231, Natural Science Building, unless
other announcement is Anade. Al-
though the meeting is not expected
to attract the general public, visitors
will be welcome.
Ptet Dream Leads Rooky Astray
The poet instinct and the artist
dream led the once ardent Ed Beadle
to shun the rigor and severe test of
camp life at Camp Cotton, and seek
some other less hazardous pursuit. If
he fails to report soon he will be
counted as a deserter and then the
price of $50 will be paid to the one for-
tunate enough to find out his where-
abouts.
Patronize Daily Advertizers. '*

TUTTLE'S COUSINS& HALL
L V N C R 0 o o fOtt
LVNCIRES and SODAS 1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
3. SO. UTATE STREET Both Phones 115 Ann Arbor, Mich.

The Farmers & Mechanics Bank HUSTON BROS.
South Main Street State StreetOf iCe The Finest Billiard Room Inthe State
Corner Siren 310 So.lSlate St, CIGARS AND CANDY
A GOOD STRONGSBANK WITH EVERY SANKING NEED "We Try to Treat You Right"
iit - 1.

NOW ON SALE
Summer School
DIRECTORY
20c

The New Catalogue
of the
s Ulliversity of Michigan
IS NOW READY
Complete information concerning the eight Colleges
and Schools:
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS,
ENGINEERING, MEDICINE, LA , PH AR-
MACY, HOMEOPATHY, DENTISTRY,
GRADUATE, AND THE SUMMER SESSION
Special Courses in Forestry, Newspaper Work,
Landscape Design, Higher Commercial Education,
including Railway Administration and Insurance,
Architecture, Conservation Engineering, Education
(affiliated with Ann Arbor Schools for Observation
Study), and a Course for those preparing for the
scientific administration of departments of sanita-
tion and public health.
For Copy of Catalogue, Special Announcement, or
Individual Information, address
The Dean of the School or College in which interested, or
SHIRLEY W. SMITH
Secretary University Ann Arbor, Mich.

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