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July 15, 1916 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1916-07-15

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THE WOLVERINE
SKESPrEARE AT MICHIGAN

SIIAEESPEAI5 AINI lIEN IJONStIN AlT ChESS
A newly discovered portrait of Shakespeare probably painted from life
by Karl van Jiander, a Dutch artist, recently purchased by the de Heyman
family of Brooklyn, N. Y.

e * * * e * * * * *

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BEN GRtEET WQODILAN)
PLAYERS
C(ampos Theater
Afternoon performances at 3
Evening performances at 8
Friday afternoon, "A Comedy
of Errors."
Friday evening, "Much Ado
About Nothing."
Saturday afternoon, "As You
Like It."
Saturday evening, "Romeo and
Juliet."

$'
5k

OOKS WORTH READING
The Macmillan Company announces
the following new books on Shakes-
peare. A new edition, enlarged and
revised, of the standard biography,
Sir Sidney Lee's "A Life of William
Shakespeare"
"Shakespeare's Theater" by Ashley
H. Thorndike. This is a thorough
survey of the theater in Shakespeare's
time and has many illustrations from
rare Elizabethan prints and portraits.
"The Tudor Shakespeare," edited by
Wfilliam A. Neilsen and Ashley A.
Thorndike. This edition is character-
ized by the authenticity of the text
and the practicality of the notes. Edit-

= : : : x

PROF. I. N. IiEM ION TEAGCIES ed by Alexander Dyce.
SHARESPEAItE WORKS 35 YEARS "Thet'oems of Shakespeare," Al-
dine Edition. This edition eontains all
Just two years before Ienry Clay the lyrical and narrative poems, and
the songs that occur in the plays.
made a famous run for the presid'ey "Concordance to Shakespeare," by
of the United States, Professor Isaac John Bartlett. A revised and enlarged
Newton Demmcsn was born in Summit edition of Bartlett's standard concord-
County, Ohio. He looks back over a ance. This contains besides the words
span of about 80 years, during which and phrases, references to passages of
he was brought up in a wilderness of considerable length. There is a sup-
Indiana, and by availing himself of all plementary concordance to the poems.
opportunities for a good education, he "The Facts about Shakespeare," by
finally became head of the department William A. Neilsen and Ashley H.
of English at the University of Mich- Thorndike. A condensed account of
igan. He has taught courses on the facts of Shakespeare's life, envir-
Shakespeare for about 35 years, and is onment and works, collating and com-
conducting courses in the present paring the various contradictory evi-
summer school. dences and theories.
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BEN GREETMASTE
|oF SHIAESPEAHE
ltttor and ifManager of Outdoor Plays
in America and England for
t ;Years
CIVE 4 EI'lZAIT'l'lAN SUETTING
Shakespcarean actors will come and
go, but it will be many years before
the world will be blessed with another
such master player as Ben Greet. A
true scholar, he has spent most of his
life in careful study of the language
of Shakespeare, and in valuable re-
search work. At the time of Queen
Victoria's Golden Jubilee, i .1887, he
organized his company of woodland
players, and since then he has played
annually at the Universities of Oxford
and Cambridge. He has won favor
alike before the crowned heads of
Europe and the uncrowned heads of
America, having played all through
Shakespeare's England, and at many
of the country seats of the English
aristocracy, as well as at every state
college and university of this country.
His is the only company of open air
players which has played on the White
House grounds.
The greatest charm of his produc-
tions is their absolute simplicity and
perfect adherence to the text. Every
word, every syllable, is said as it
was said in the productions of the
seventeenth century. And Ben Greet
dispences with the monstrous trap-
pings of the modern stage,-does away
with gaudy and complex settings, and
relies on the beauty of the play itself,
the perfection of the acting, to at-
tract and interest his audience. Act-
ed in the open air with leafy boughs
as background and grassy turf as a
floor, his plays have a freshness and
charm which mingles perfectly with
the bouyancy of Shakespeare's lan-
guage.
In this connection Richard Burton
says, "The recent tendency to return
to a more seemly simplicity and to the
assumption that the spectator's imag-
ination will help to stage a play, if on-
ly it be trusted, is a promising thing
with this in mind. The work of Ben
Greet and the Coburns in aiding aud-
iences to grasp this fact by their re-
turn to something of the Elizabethan
manner, whether historically accurate
or not, is welcome for this reason."
Just to look at the genial face of
Ben Greet, one feels that he "could a
tale unfold" if ever anyone could. And
he can, and will, if asked when he
happens to be in a reminiscent mood.
He was born 57 years ago on board
an English war vessel of which his
father was captain. His brother is
Admiral Thomas Young Greet of the
British navy. He has spent the great-
er part of his life in study, but for the
part 36 years he has been an actor,
and for 31 years a theatrical manager
as well. He has been offered chairs
in two universities of this country,
but has refused to give up his work.
He selects all of his players, and be-
fore they appear before the public,
they are required to serve a five year
apprenticeship under costant and
strict supervision. It is said that Mr.
Greet has trained more theatrical
stars than has any other one man.
Seventy-two companies left New York
in 1911 with Greet players in the lead-
ing roles. mong others, Mr. Greet has
tutored H. B. and Lawrence Irving,
Edith Wynne Mathison, and Mrs. Pat-
rick Campbell.
The supreme proof of Ben Greet's
greatness has come with the war. At
the first call, he returned to his home
in Kent, England, where he has since

been doing much to alleviate the suf-
fering by filling his house with refu-
gees whom he has fed, clothed and
cared for generally. Besides this, he
has been playing in Victoria Hall and
at Stratford in the huge Shakespear-
ean Tercentenary recently celebrated
there.

Tercen tenaries
Given in America
P~ercy 1lackaye's Masusle iiPIk it y
Many Prominent Actors in
New York City
One of the most important of the
tercentenary celebrations in America
seas Percy Mackaye's masque "Cali-
lan" given in the Stadium of the Uni-
versity of the City of New York.
Among the prominent actors who took
part in this masque were John Drew,
Edith Wyane Matthison, David Bisp-
issue ansi Robert Bantell. Another
Shakespearean Masque was given in
the Century Theater, New York, in
honor of William Winter, the author
and dramatic critic. There are many
illustrious names in the list of those
who took part, such as Walter Hamp-
den, Viola Allen, Crystal Herne, Rose.
Coghlan, Henrietta Crossman, Jane
Cowl, Anna Russell, and Elsie Fergu-
son.
A no less noteworthy event was the
large amount of Shakespearean litera-
ture which appeared in the magazines
and newspapers at the time of the ter-
centenary celebrations. Articles by
prominent men of letters and dramatic
critics of both America and England
constituted a real Shakespeat'ean re-
vival. The subjects of the articles
ranged from "Shakespeare and the
Sea," "The Word Musician Who Loved
His Tools," to critical discussions of
the most famous characters and the
actors who have helped to create them.
As John Palmer, dramatic critic of
The Saturday Review, of London, says,
"it is Shakespeare's privilege to be
born again about once every quarter of
a ce'ntury. Each generation has praised
him for a different reason. * * * All
this simply means that each genera-
tion has discovered some new aspect
of Shakespeare's genius, and that it
has quite rightly resented the blind-
ness to its own particular discovery of
those who went before. a * * The
spirit and mental attitude of the gen-
erations has differed from period to
period with the result that one gen-
eration has worshiped what another
has discarded."

SHAKESPEARENS
HOLO GELEBRTION
h'os . Nlesscmsn, . 1'. 'Tilley, ail
T l ecisdtnce Mse'
ln lce is , n es 'Tre'stenary
Celebratiose ivee Tst night in Uni-
versiy hal Iheee "xperts on Shakes-
peare's works explained to the pub-
lie the influence of his works on mod
ern life and the great charm which he,
holds still for every reader. Those
appearing on the program were:
Professors I. N. Denmtsn, Horris .
Tilley, of the E'Jng isl slepartient, and1
Thomas C. Trueblood, of the oratory
department.
Prof. 1. N. naDemmon, who appeared
first on the program of the evening,
chose as his subject, "Romance and
Reality in the Tempest." Prof. Dem-
mon traced the traditions which gave
to Shakespeare the theme of "The
Tempest." Chief among these was
the foundingof the colony at James-
town and the adventures and ship-
wreck of the returning ships. "The
scene of 'The Tempest' though located
in a desert isle in the niddle of an
unknown sea has much of the char-
acter of England. The persons ap-
pearing in the scene are many of
them English though they possess
foreign names. Thus Trinculo the
drunken sailor when he first sees the
monster Caliban desires to transport
him to England where a deal of money
could be gained by exhibiting him.
This practice of side shows in front of
theaters was very common in Shakes-
peare's time," was Prof. Demmon's
way of explaining the English char-
acter of the Tempest.
Prof. P. Tilley followed Prof. Dem-
mon and gave as his subject, "Hamlet's
Character."
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood in con-
clusion of the program gave from
Hamlet, the gravedigger scene, and
the closet scene where Hamlet stabs
Polonius.

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