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July 13, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1916-07-13

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AT>YOUR DOOR VI THE ONLY OFFICIAL
3 TIMES A WEEK, 75 SUMMER NEWSPAPER

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1916

PRICE FIVE CENTS

1 DATEM,'14
MMITS SicICI[
Student Drinks Poison in
ising When Jilted by Old
Sweetheart

IVGIS NEW. UCIT
ON MISHNAIAHLIIIONS
Dayton, Ohio, Rabbi Traces Old Legal
System of Jews to Its
Modern Relatives

HEAVY APPLAUSE
MARSMSICA[
Heat Fails to' Keep Enthusiastic
Crowds From Hearing
Second Concert

CHADLES SILSBY, IGHT YEARS LD,
ADDE TO VURON'S VICTIM ILIST
CAMP DAVIS MAN IS INJUItE1 IBY FOUR BOYS G1) CANOEING WITH
FALL FROM WAGON GOING HOME FATAL RESI LTS WIHEN CAN-
VAS BOAT TIPS OVER

RECORD EXCELLENT HERE In spite of the recent heat wave a MISS HUNT WINS HIGH FAVOR
fair sized attendance listened to the

John Franke, '17E, a student at
Camp Davis while returning home

After holding a long talk with Du-
waine Mosher, '13L, her former college
lover in which she discovered that his
love for her was dead, Miss Nora
Bartrem, '14, committed suicide in
Lansing, Mich., Wednesday morning
by drinking bichloride of mercury.
Miss Bartrem and Mosher were close
friends while studnts here but since
graduation he had lost his interest in
the affair. It is stated by the police
that from evidences discovered by
them, Miss Bartrem came to Lansing
from her home in Port Huron with the
intention of first shooting Mosher and
then committing suicide. A revolver
and another bottle of bichloride of
mercury were found in her handbag.
She arrived in Lansing Tuesday
evening and registered at the Hotel
Downey. She did not stay at the hotel,
however, but was found by Mosher at
11 o'clock waiting for him on the
porch of his rooming house where she
said that she wished to talk over old
times with him.
About midnight she asked him to
accompany her to her hotel. On the
wlay she made a pretext to fix some of
her apparel and asked him to -walk
ahead. He did so and turned around
in time to see her drinking out of a
bottle. He hailed a passing automo-
bile and took her to the hotel and then
to a hospital. She died three hours
later.
While at school Miss Bartrem was
one of the best liked of her class and
her classmates and teachers state that
it is hard to believe that she would
commit such an act. She was a bril-
liant student, receiving the highest
marks possible to obtain from the
school of music and possessng an ex-
cellent voice. iss Bartrem was a
member of a local sorority while in
school.
Come In Boys_
andWin Cup
jDuring the last few days the entries
for the summer tennis tournament
have been increasing, but they have
not been coming in fast enough. There
are only a little over half the neces-
ary number now and it is desired to
fill the entries up by the last of the
week if possible.
The entries for the tennis tourna-
ment dragged along this same way last
year with the result that the finals
were not pulled off until after the
summer session was over. The only
way to make a tournament like this
interesting is to run it off on time and
have enough men to make it worth
while. There is only one way to do
this and that is to sign up at once at
The WolveNine office or with Doe. May
at the Ferry Field club house.
Library Lights Blow Out
Students who were studying in the
library yesterday at 11:20 a. in., got
the shock of their lives when the fuse
of one of the electric facilities blew
out. No damge was done.

second lecture of Rabbi D. Lefkowitz,
of Dayton, Ohio, on the subject, "The
Literary Expression of the Oral Tra-
dition of the Mishna," yesterday after-
noon-.
In this lecture, the speaker wished
to show the development of literature
of the Hebrews between the periods
of the Old and New Testaments, a
period lasting approximately 500 years.
The Mishna was an expression of the
laws of the Hebrews which were for-
merly handed down from mouth to
mouth, the writings being found in
the Talmud. 'These writings, he said,
were not studied by men of the Chris-
tian faith for two main reasons.
First-There is a difference in lan-
guage, because Mishna is a product of
the Semitic race and the sentences are
so short as to require 50 lines in the
Talmud to equal three of the Mishna.
Second-The outlook is totally for-
eign to the Christian scholar in its
conceptions of legalism; it is not a
Christian concept.
The name Mishna is from the word
"Shana"-to repeat, and the law from
it was learned by oral repetition. The
work is divided into many parts and
treatises concerning the government
of the common acts and deeds of the
Hebrews.
Rabbi Lefkowitz quoted several ex-
tracts from the work which showed
its profound, almost Biblical tone, and
it is easily realized that it had a pro-
found influence on the everyday life
of the people. One which every col-
lege student might well post on the
,walls of his room was the quotation,
"In a place where there is no man,
strive thou to be a man." Another,
"There are three crowns : that of the
Priesthood, the Torn and that of Roy-
alty, but best of all is the crown of a
good name."
CHAIR OF SALESMANSHIP IS
URGED BY MR. EDWARD HINES
Detroit, Mich., July 13.-Chairs of
salesmanship in the leading universi-
ties and colleges of the country were
advocated before the World's Sales-
manship congress here today by Ed-
ward Hines of Chicago. He also urg-
ed postgraduate courses in salesman-
ship, which would include a thorough
grounding in economics and practical
business law.
Mr. Hines declared that it was train-
ed study that made the German sales-
man one of the wonders of the busi-
ness world.

The intense heat did not prevent a srom sopiuase sass sac
large number from enjoying the sec- in company with several other engi-
ond faculty concert in Hill auditoritun neers, fell from a lumber wagon and
last evening. In fact, they were so was hurt severely on the foot and
enthusiastic that their applause was ankle.
sufficient to wring an additional num- Franke was returning from a dance
her from at least one of the artists, an which many of the boys attended in
occurrence which does not often hap- the neighboring town.
pen at these concerts, generous as the
performers are. T 7trinut TNew
Mr. Albert Lockwood, pianist, de- Ldast j ii ute j eru s
lighted his hearers with his brilliant Told
playing. His numbers were the more old in. rief
interesting because of Mr. Lockwood's
carefully arranged notes which ap- GERMANS STRIKE HART)
peared on the program, explaining the
numbers and giving something of their London, July 13.-The Germans,
history and their rank among the heavily reinforced, yesterday attempt-
composer's other productions. Beet- ed to storm the positions held by the
hoven's Sonata (Op. 111) and the British to the north of the Somme
Schubert-Tausig March Militaire were river' and brought on one of the most
best received. It was after the latter terrific battles of the war. It was
that Mr. Lockwood was obliged to still continuing with unabated fury when.
the applause with an encore. the official reports were sent from Gen.
Perhaps no member of the School of Haig's headquarters last night.
Music faculty is more loved than Miss The battle centers on the Mametz
Nora Crane Hunt. Her sweet con- and Trones woods. The Germans
tralto voice wins new friends for her fought their way into and captured a
at each hearing. Last night it was large section of both woods Tuesday
particularly sweet and flexible. Her night. The British troops recaptured
number was Schubert's Ave Maria all of Mametz wood during the day
with organ accompaniment by Mr. E. and have recovered some of the posi-
V. Moore. She also gave a group of tions in Trones forest.
simple songs among them the ever Summorized briefly the present situ-
delightful Rain Song by Carl Hahn. ation is this:
Miss Hunt was given a lovely floral German attacks carry positions won
basket at the end of the concert. by British, but counter charges re-
Mrs. Minnie Davis Sherrill, of De- cover part of them; Germans gain
troit, played her accompaniments. near Verdun.

1
l

SON OFDRID. H.SILSBY, 16
Donald Perkins, '17E, Tries to Save
Boys But Only Rescues
Three
Some little boys went canoeing on
the Huron river yesterday afternoon.
The Dead
Charles Silsby, eight years old, son
of r. Don H. Slsby, '1611, of Lowell,
Mich.
Late in the afternoon the four small
boys were playing on the banks of the
Perkins farm up the river about a
half a mile from the boathouse. The
boys were diving and swimming and
playing as all boys do. Then one of
the quartette found a small canvas
canoe on the bank. It was proposed
that they take a ride. They jumped in
and started off. Before they had
reached mid stream, the water which
is very swift at this point, turned the
canoe around. In trying to head it up
stream one of them leaned a little too
far. The canoe tipped over. The four
boys were thrown in the water.
Donald Perkins, '17E, who was
working in a nearby field, came to
the rescue. He dived into the water
and grabbed two of the boys and pull-
ed them in to shore. Then he came
back and tried to save the other two.
He succeeded in saving only one of
them. Charles sank before the man
could reach him. Perkins dived re-
peatedly till exhausted, but failed to
reach the body.
Help was called for and the police
brought grappling hooks. On account
of the boy's body being naked the
hooks failed to bring him up. For
two hours the men worked trying to
pull the ho y ouL It lay at the bot-
tom of a deep hole and they could
plainly see it.
Finally a student dived in and
brought the body up. He almost
drowned in the attempt.
The boy's father is in Lowell, Mich-
igan, practicing medicine. He gradu-
ated from the medical school in June.
MANY MENOF MICICAN
Stude and Others About the State
nitering at Eastern Mill-
fry Camp
More than a score of men connected
withthe tniverity of Michigan have
been enrolling in the Plattsburg mili-
tary training camp for this summer,
and various of the men have promise
to write accounts to The Wolverine
during the coming months. Numerous
of the names in the lists are prominent
on the campus, including John C. B.
Parker, '17, HI. Gray Muzey, '1f, Wil-
liam Darnall, '8iM, and several faculty
men, including Prof. Edward Boak and
Prof. John W. Bradshaw.
Material gathered and released today
(Continued on Page Four)

MMRAS COAPPLE IN
WHIINEY_JONICGHI
Preketes, Olympic Champ, and Jackson
Strong Man, Will Furnish
Main Excitement
The Whitney theater tonight will be
the scene of a benefit wrestling bout
for Company I fund.
The main match of the evening will
be between Charles Preketes, who
weighs 185, and the Jackson Strong
Man who will go on the mat at 120.
Preketes has a great handicap in
weight but from his past record ought
to handle his man.
At the Olympic games of 1896 held
at Athens, Preketes took first place in
wrestling, as well as fourth place in
the discus and also placed in the shot,
(Continued on Page Four)

Germans drive Russians back across
river barrier before Kovel, big rail
road center.
Out-Door JMovie
OpenJuly 15th
According to J. H. Coker, who is
managing the new Garden Theater on
State street, the new outdoor movie
house will be ready with a snappy
show Saturday night, July 15. This
will be a new feature for this city and
it is assured by the management that
a very good class of pictures will be
given to the public. The theater will
hold about 500 people and the hot
weather will only make it more of a
success.
One of the most attractive features
of the new show house will be the as-
surance of a very good class of music.
The program of the New Garden The-
ater will be announced soon.

AT LAST
BI"BEZ"DANCEI

PACKARD ACADEMY, FRIDAY, JULY 14
IKE'S RAGTIME, SAXAPHONE, BANJORINE ORCHESTRA
Tickets at CUSHINGS and WOLVERINE

O'Clock

.1 O'Clock

r

Friday Afternoon
COMEDY OF ERRORS
Friday Evening

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTH
Saturday Afternoon
AS YOU LIKE IT
Saturday Evening
ROMEO AND JULIET

INC

ANNUAL SUMMER SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT
BEN GREET'S
WOODLAND PLAYERS

Seat Sale at Wahr's State
Street Store
Opens Saturday, July 15
at 3 P. *M.
Thereafter Daily: at
4:30 P. M.
Reserved Seats 75c
A Reduced Rate of $2.50
for the 4 Performances

CAMPUS THEATRE,

JULY 21,22

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