100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 12, 1910 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1910-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

i

Players are particular
about cues. We have good
cues; light or heavy, plain,
corded, or ebony to suit.
Find what you like and we
reserve itfor you in private
drawer without charge.
HUSTON BROS.
307-309S. State St.
THE WELL-KNOWN
Chubb House
One Block from Campus.
209 S. State St.
Rates, $3,50 Per Week
Co to the
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
FOR ALL YOUR
Summer School Supplies
Note Books, Fountain Pens, Station-
ry, Fine Line of Candes,
Cigars, Etc.
L. C. SCHLEEDE
1111 South University
E. R. FROST
302 SOUTH STATE STREET
DEALER IN
Ladies and Gents'
Fine Footwear
Sole Agent for the Famous
CRAWFORD SHOES
Eberbach & Son Company
WAOL . SALE AND RETAIL
Chemicals, Drugs and Sundries
W00-202 E. Liberty St.
WOLVERINE
CLVB ROOM
Billiards and Pool
Tobaccos and Cigars
Everything New
Student Patronage Solicited.
Opp. D. U. a. Station.
113 W. Huron 5.. NOYES, Prop.
FOR photographic film
and printing paper,
cameras, pure chemi-
cals and supplies of allkinds,
come to this store and you
will be certain of depend-
able quality. Wesellthe
L ' FILM
which makes truer, better-

balanced negatives, and
Cyko Paper for deeper,
softer, clearer prints.
Let us show you our
splendid assortment of
cameras. Pure chemicals,
all photographic supplies.
Developing and printing
doue. Reasonable charges. .Q
E.J. SCHMIDT
34s. State St.
Phone-Bell 95 L

DRINK SOUR MILK.
(Continued from Page 1.)
cluding the bacteria causing putrefac-
tion, will not grow in an acid medium,
One of the acids knows to be most ef-
fective in arresting bacterial growth is
the acid of sour milk or lactic ocid.
"The contents of the alimentarv canal
may be made acid by drinking consid-
erable quantities of sour milk, or by in-
jecting cultures of living bacteria, allow-
ing the bacteria to form lactic acid in
the intestines from sugar or milk taken
as articles of ordinary food. For the
latter purpose a bacillus coming from
Bulgaria is cultivated and sold in dry
tablet form. Physiciasethe world over
are sow prescribitg sour milk for pa-
tients with discordered digestion.
"The reasonableness of the sour milk
diet, or the eating of lactic acid bac-
teria involves two distinct propositions:
(i) the reduction of putrefaction in the
large intestine, thereby improving the
health by preventing euto-intoxicaton;
(2) the prolongation of life by prevent-
ing the weakening of the vital organs
through auto-intoxication, this weaken-
ing exposing the active cells of these
organs to the attack of the phagocytes."
PRES. JORDAN WOULD ABOLISH
FOOTBALL IN COLLEGES
Just when we thought we were settled
down to a quiet consideration of the
gentler things of life; and when even
Reno finds her taste for discussion of
the everlasting goriness of man-to-man
conflicts palling, up springs the effer-
vescent David Starr, and lands a curd-
ling uppercut on the jaw of our col-
legiate pastime.
This from the columns of the metro-
politan press:
Boston, July 5.-Denouncing college
football as a combination of pure bru-
tality and pugilism that appealed to the
love of the sordid, Dr. David Starr Jor-
dan, president of Leland Stanford Uni-
versity, led in the discussion that fol-
lowed a report made today by the com-
mittee on moral education in public
schools to the national council of edu-
cation of the National Education asso-
ciation, in convention here. le added:
"Some day the college presidents and
school heads of this country will per-
haps be called cowardly and brutal be-
cause they do not put a stop to the dang-
ers of football, a sport that destroys the
best there is in American youth."
The game, he continued, aroused the
same love of the sordid that focused
the iterest of the country it "a ring
away out in Nevada, where a black man
and a white man were pounding each
other yesterday."
"No intelligence is required in the
game of football," he asserted. "Black-
smiths and boilermakers can play the
game as well as men of the fiter intel-
lects; in fact they are considered the
best raw material of the game."
Dr. Jordan favored the substitution of
the English game of rugby.

GYMNASIUM WORK
GIVEN AFTERNOONS
Lectures on First Aid to the
Injured Will be Given
in Near Future
TEACHERS' COURSES PROVIDED
"Gymnasitm classes for men are now
being held every day," said Dr. May yes-
terday afternoon. "Regular classes meet
afternoons at 4:to, and as soon as
enough have registered instruction will
be given in the work for teachers."
Those students who are expecting to
teach gymnasium work, and desire to
take work here should register at once."
The regular courses for men ielude
sutch work as general gymnastics atd
phsysical traitting. Uneder this will be
given work embracing a discussion of
the anatomical principles of exercises
and movements is accordance with
anatomical and physiological standards,
class drills including both the German
and Swedish methods, tactics in march-
ing, and the use of elementary and ad-
vanced gymnasium apparatus.
Corrective gymnastics will be given to
assist teachers of gymnastics in the
treatment of pupils who are physically
weak, undeveloped or deformed, as fre-
quently found in school or college and
referred by physicians to a gymnasium
for special treatment.
About the middle of the summer ses-
sion, the exact date to be announced
later, lectures wil be given in the treat-
ment of emergencies. The aim of these
lectures will be to outline clearly the
common sense methods to be employed
in rendering first aid to the injured;
what to do in case of accidents on the
street, in school, in the ymgnasium, or
on the athletic field; what to do first it
cases threatening death from falls,
blows, bleeding, or incipient drowning.
Other lectures to be given at intervals
will deal with sources of information,
modern methods and instruments of
measurement. Individual practice will
be afforded in taking measurements and
tests. There will also be a discussion
and illustration of the methods em-
ployed it strength tests.
Special exercises will also be a part
of the regular summer work if enoughs
express their desire for this work and
enroll in time. These exercises will in.
elude such work as practice in club-
swinging, fencing, and wrestling.
Dr. May's office hours are from 3:30
p. st. to 5:30 every day except Satur-
day.
THE PALAIS ROYAL.,
Pennants, fancy work and curios.
Best prices. 209 E. Liberty.

ANARCI ST LEADER IiESN'T
1,IKE MICHIGll;AN STI'Ui)DNTI'S
Enma Goldman didn't like her visit
to Ann Arbor last spring. Until now,
she has never definitely expressed her-
self, but now we will have to believe
that Emma Goldman, "Goddess of An-
archy" was not pleased by the reception
accorded her by the student body here.
Here's what she has to sa
"Ann Arbor ! Brain producer of eMich-
igan, hide thy face in shame
eFive hundred university rowdies in
a hall, whistling, howling, pushing, yell-
ing like escaped lunatics. That a panic
was averted is altogether due to my
recollection of Isben'se tise te of sesi
psc hology so wonderf litiextssel it
the lines of Dr. Stockmann : Not two
decent stones in the whole bunch, the
rest are pebbles.'
"These pampered parasites, but not one
of them with enough back-bone to ight
a flea, were there, yelling and scream-
ing in true American fashion. A cousec
in behavior and decency xvould .not be
amiss at Ann Arbor. The maniacs at
y teetingmstt represent but a small
part of use stuenest ibody."
SUMMER SCHOOL AT GRA\NGER'S
School of dancing opens Frida' even-
ing, July 8th. Classes for ladies and
gentlemen iuesday and Friday evenings,
7 to 8 o'clock. Tuition $300.
Programme parties will also be held
eon sames veeings, 8 0 eto O'CIOCk. For

particulars
2 6.

call at Academy er pione

FULLER & O'CONNOR
Steam and French
Dry Cleaners
Suits Pressed 25c
Trousers 10c
619 E. William Street
JOHN H. LAMBERT
The University Shoe Shop
Full line of Arrows ithl Art isProps
with Machinery for Adjusting
LACES AND POLISHES
613 E. William St., Ann Arbor
THt FARMERS AND MECiANICS BANK
MAIN AND HURON STREETS
Capital $50,000 Surplus and Profits$100,000
GenerallBanking Business. 3percent paid
on Time and Saving; ,Deposits. Safety De-
posit Boxes to reentset 52.00 and upwards
R1. KEMP'tre. tiltP rTTYMAN, Vice-PreS.
H. A. WILLIAus. Cashier F. T. STOwE, Asst.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Capital Stock 550,000 Surplus $290,000
Resources $2,00,000
A eneral Banking Business Transacted
OrUICERs: Chas. E. Hiscock, Pres.; W. D.
Harriman, Vice Pres.: M. J. FritzCashier
STATE SAVINGS BANK
DIRECTORS:
W. J. Booth Jno. V. Sheehan
W. Arnold Dr. V. C. Vaughan
ias. tH. Wade E. F. Mills
John Haarer .nez.IKoc e
Prot H. S.Carhart Henry W. Douglas
Christian Martin Dan F. Zimmerman
Commercla.l a.nd
Sa.veings
Car. Maoi and Liberty Streeto
COMPLETE CAFE FOR STUDENTS
DAY AND NIGHT
G. C. BISSELL
Everything New and Clean
oU. of M. and
Huron River Boat Livery
Canoes and BoatstRented
P. G. TESSMER, Proprietor
Both Phones 656

Lost-"Web & Flange" pi. Call Wol-
verine office. 4-56
If you want your flms developed by
hand and by an expert, go to Long-
man's. Each film gets personal atten-
tion during process of development.
Try the net salted peanuts; only one
place in town-Cushing's Pharmaey.
Have you seen Longman's 1 Scrap
Books?
Bu your footwear of Allmand & For-
sythee.
Old pens made good as new or taken
in exchange for new ones. J. L. Skinner.
Amateur photographers 1 If you want
your work done right go to Longman's,
Erg E. Liberty St.
Drawing instruments .harpened. J. L.
Skinner.
It is a bad old book that can't be re-
formed and made stronger than new.
Brimg in your Ziwet's mechanics, etc.,
and let us try it. J. L. Skinner.
Packard shoes and oxfords at Allmand
& Forsythe.

FA MILY THEATIRE
BIJOV
DEAN M. SEABOLT, .Sole Owner a.d Manage.
w COOLER THAN THE POLAR REoIONS ow
Tonight and Tomorrow Night
BISBEE and CONNELLY
Expert Rope Spinners and Musicians
Veronica Hussmann
Singing and Dancing Soubrette, and Others
THVRSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
Past Master of Dancing, JOHN D. McGINN
Self Explanatory Life Motion Pictures. "'a"Ballads **
Musical Comedy Oddity
Wells Brothers
A Kieth and Proctor Act

THE NEW CATALOGUE
OF THE
U1vcrs1ty of Michigau
Is ready for distribution at the Secretary's Office.
It contains complete information concerning all of
the Departments of the University. Fall semester
begins October 4, 1910.
A copy of the Catalogue with special publications relating to any
department will be sent on application to
SH I RLEY W. SMITH,.Secretary
Ann Arbor, Ilichigan

10 Cents Always.

NEVER HIGHER

l1 _1

Portrait Studio- 319 East Huron Street

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan