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July 15, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Z, 1650,9

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.ry

5. 195S THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tdvanced Placement Helps
cif ted Students in Studies

Children's Books on Display

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
Students far beyond the ior-
i1 range of intelligence are in-
'ed by being pressed into the
ild of routine teaching, the
ckstep," Isabel S. Gordon said
)nday in her speech, "Release
om the Lockstep: The Ad-
rced Placement Program in
glish."
Mrs. Gordon, of the Bronx
.gh School of Science English
partment in New York City,
:ke on the Advanced Placement
ogram, first formulated by the
rd Foundation and adopted by
e College Board in 1955, as

ISABEL S. GORDON
..some hide high IQ's
Art Exhibit,,
Conferene
Scheduled
The seventh annual Michigan
Regional Art Exhibition and Con-
ference will be held. at the Uni-
versity on July 27.
'ihe exhibition will contain
works by approximately 160
Michigan artists, and will con-
tinue through Aug. 8. The Con-
ference and the exhibition are
sponsored by the Extension Serv-
ice, the Summer Session, and the,
architecture and design college.4
The invitational exhibition will
feature work which has been
awarded recognition in local and
regional shows during the past
year. It will be shown in the mez-
zanine' galleries, which will be
open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily,
except Sunday.
The Conference. program will
begin at 10 a.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheatre, and the opening
speaker will be, Joy Hakanson, art
editor of the Detroit News.
At 2 p.m., Prof. Richard Wilt of
the design college will give a
demonstration in oil painting at
the Architecture Aud. At the
same time, Mary Jane Bigler of
Wayne State University will give
a demonstration in water color in
Schorling Aud., University High
School.
^ DIAL No 2-2513
JAMES STEWART
LEE REMICK
BEN GAZZARA
ARTHUR O'CONNELL
EVE ARDEN ,
KATHRYN GRANT.
and JOSEPH N. WELCH as Judge Weaver
SHOWS DAILY AT
12:30 - 3:10 - 6:03 - 8:56

seeking to provide an open path
for the gifted child, encouraging
him to proceed at a faster than
average pace.
Some bright students are for-
tunate in finding a gifted teacher
who helps them grow as they
should, Mrs. Gordon said, but the
Advanced Placement Program is
an attempt to institutionalize
this opportunity.
Program 'Most Important'
Despite the small number of
exceptionally bright st u d e n t s,
"each one' is very precious and
easily injured by living in a world
set up for the average person,"
Mrs. Gordon maintained.
The Advanced Placement Pro-
gram is therefore "most import-
ant" to individual growth over
and above the good it may do for
the country in general, she con-
tinued.
Mrs. Gordon cited the not un-
usual case of the bright child who
hides his high IQ from his family
and community because he is
perceptive enough to know that
his exceptional intelligence makes
life difficult. The Program at-
tempts to provide a means of
recognition to give the bright
child "the courage to be as bright
as he is," Mrs. Gordon said.
This program is an effort to
organize and make a v a i a b l e
everywherenthe opportunity for
advancement. Where there are
too few bright students in a
school to make the program
worthwhile, a tutorial system is
provided, after which the student
can take the advanced placement
examination when he enters col-
lege.
By completing some college re-
quirements while in high school
through the Program, the college
student may begin graduate work
earlier, or have more time to ex-
plore various fields.
The able and ambitious student
must be invited to take these col-
lege level courses offered in high
school through this program. He
must be able to carry the com-
plete high school course plus one
course in advanced work.
Uses Analytical Method
The student participating in
the program must have his fam-
ily's approval, since he is expect-
ed to buy the books for his ad-
vanced course and pay for out-
side activities, such as plays, .oft-
en important in his special curri-
culum. The "financially handi-
capped" gifted student, however,
is given support by the education
board.
Mrs. Gordon stressed the ana-
lytical method in teaching her
advanced English course. By cov-
ering a play "inch by inch" in
the classroom, the student learns
to read analytically, thus gaining
valuable preparation for college.
Education boards are reluctant
'to spend extra money for the
special teachers required for the
Advanced Placement Program,
but "those students who can give
us leadership and insight should
be supported," she concluded.
CD Exercise
Set for Today
Washtenaw County residents
will be advised of the start of to-
day's large-scale "take cover"
exercise by a three-minute wail-
ing of sirens ,ringing of church
bells and blowing of whistles.
All residents have been asked
by Civil Defense Director Gerald
G. Miller to take cover when they
hear the signals, which will be
shortly after 2 p.m. The drill will
last for 10 minutes.
When the exercise ends, there
will be two 30-second sounds
from the sirens, whistles and

bells, separated by a minute of
silence, notifying residents of the
"all clear signal."
All' traffic within city and vil-
lage limits will be stopped and
drivers will be asked to get out
of their cars and take shelter in-
side nearby stores and other
buildings.

-Daily-Robert Dennis
BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS!-In the corridors of University High School the passer-by can find
exhibits of books, both texts and informal reading matter. The exhibit is on display in conjunction
with the conference on elementary education, which ends today. It includes an extensive selection
of children's literature, including many award-winning books. Also in the exhibit are illustrated
books from many countries, giving the display an international flavor. The exhibit was set up by
the University Library.
ELECTRONIC WATCHDOG:
Machine Stimulates Boy's Heart

709

ELECTRONIC WATCHDOG-The machine in the left background, known as an "electronic watch-
dog," is connected to the chest of Jimmy Brunk, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Brunk of Dearborn. It
helps to keep the 18-month-old boy alive by stimulating and pacing his heart when it stops. He has
had twelve such attacks in the last three months. The youngster, victim of a congenital heart block,
is shown being tended by Nurse Merle Stanley. University Medical Center doctors are 'seeking the
proper medicines and dosages which will eventually free Jimmy from his dependence on the machine.

!

[DAILY, OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Organization
Notices

A~

Sailing Club, regular weekly meeting,
July 16, 7:30 p.m., 311 W. Engineering.

I

(Continued from Page 2)
Lectures
Forum Lecture, auspices of :Linguis-
tics Institute. Thurs., July 16, 7:30
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. "Mara-
thi Structure." O. L. Chavarria-
Aguilar.
The Research Club in Language
Learning sponsors two talks for lan-
guage teachers: Prof. Jame Noonan,
Univ. of London, "Teaching English
by Sound Radio;" Prof. Wm. E. Bull,
Univ. of Calif., "Systemic Linguistics
and Audio-visual Aids." Wed., July 15,
7:30 p.m., Angell Hall Aud A.
Concerts
Stanley Quartet: Gilbert Ross, violin,
Robert Courte, viola, Paul Olefsky, cel-
lo. Rackham Lecture Hall, Wed., July
15 at 8:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital: John Flower, pian-
ist, lecture-recital on Johann Sebas-
tian Bach's "Well-Tempered Clavier."
Thurs., July 16, at 8 30 p.m. Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
Academic Notices
Mathematics Colloquium: Thurs.,
July 16, 4:10 p.m., Rm. 3011 Angell
Hall. Prof. L M. James of the Univ. of
Chicago will be the speaker. Refresh-
ments at 3:30 p.m. in Rm. 3212 Angell
Hall.
Placement Notices

The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies with the Bureau of
Appointments for the 1959-60 school
year.
Almont, Mich. - Elementary; HS:
English; Math; Lang.; Libr.; Girls PE.
Battle Creek, Mich. (L a k e v i e w
Schools)-HS Library.
Berkley, Mich. - Mechanical Draw-
ing/Driver Education; 5th grade.
Boyne City, Mich. - Elementary.
Cement City, Mich. - Commercial;
Math/Science; Kindergarten; 1st grade.
Dearborn, Mich. (Cherry Hill School)
-Early Elementary.
Flint, Mich. (Carmen School Dis-
trict) - Early Elementary.
Marshall, Mich. - American Govt.;
Science/Math (JHS); Early Elementary.
Oscoda, Mich. - Elementary.
Otsego, Mich. - JHS English; HS
Commercial.
Paw Paw, Mich. - Girls PE; Elemen-
tary.
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Townshig
Schools) - 7th grade basic subjects;
8th grade Math; 9th grade Algebra/
General Math.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Personnel Requests:
Western Coating Co., Royal Oak,
Mich., has need of a person with a
B.S. in Chemistry for research work in
coatings and product development.
Will also consider person to work full
time during summer and part time
during the school year. The company
manufactures rust preventive coatings,
ethyl cellulose, and vinyls.
Hardware Mutuals Co. has openings
for Loss Prevention Engineer in the
western Michigan area, to be based in
Grand Rapids. Age: 25-30. Some fac-
otry experience and must know some-
thing about machinery and equip-
ment. They also have opening for a
salesman in the Mt. Pleasant area.
For further' information concerning
any of the above positions, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

DEAL NO 2-3 136

"

a

C05AR PETER FINCH
DAME EDITH EVANS DAME PEGGY ASHCROFT
DEAN JAGGER SCRENPLAY BYOROBERT ANDERSON
PRocDBYHENRY BLANKE WALCEO 'MFRED ZINNEMANN
PRESENTED BY WARNER BROS.
SHOWS AT
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:20 - 9:10

d

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