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July 10, 1959 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-10

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Y. JULY 10,' 1959

THV MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE"

fIlLY 10: 1959 TH1~ MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

*EflfEDr

POSSIBLE TO EXPLOIT:
Albania Called Weak in Soviet Chain

imeless and Timely'
Meet in Art of Theatre

,
.,

FOR RENT
DELUXE 3 room furnished apartment
includes heat and water. Semi-private
bath facilities. $90 a month. NO
2-9020. C27
4 ROOMS, first floor, across from Rack-
ham. $100 a month. Unfurnished.
Available August 1st. NO 3-2836.
C26
FOR RENT first semester only-Pro-
fessor's attractive 2 bedroom home.
Professional or grad student 'couple
or women wanted. Everything fur-
nished including gas. Near Ann Arbor
High School. Price discussed at inter-
view. Call NO 3-8473 afternoons. C25
3 ROOM large apartment to share with
one person. -One block from campus.
$40 a month. Call after 5 P.M., NO
3-7393. C24
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. % block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. C12
3 BEDROOM furnished apt. for 4 girls
or 4 boys. Includes silver and dishes.
Tastefully decorated by interior dec-
orator. Convenient Liberty St. loca-
tion. $160 per month, including heat
and water. Phone NO 3-5098 evenings.
C19
ROOMS FOR MEN: Quiet. Campus area.
Linens furnished. Low rent. NO 3-4747.
C15
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 8-7089 or 3-3280.
Cl
PERSONAL
LESSONS in singing and sapeaking,
CarolF. Westerman, NO 8-6584, F9
Carol:
Seel, Reading can be fun.
Bill F15
Dear P. 3.,
Mrs. Nebbish wants to see her best-
est friend.
S.B. F17
Mike t

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES I DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S SKIP-dent short-sleeve sport
shirts. $1.39, 2 for $2.50. Wash 'n Wear,
sanforized, assorted colors. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. Wl
USED CARS
'56 Triumph, TR3 $1,595
Mich. European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N16
1953 STUDEBAKER, 6 cylinder with
overdrive. $200. See between 5-6 P.M.
at 510 Lawrence, apt. 6. N15
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Try Hammond's new play time plan.
Includes organ in your home for 30
days with 6 free lessons in our
studio for only $25. Rent a Spinet
piano of your own choice-$10 per
month.
GRINNELL'S

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING, all kinds done professionally,
reasonable rates, will call for and
deliver. NO 5-6713. J14
PREPARE FOR THE BLAST-OFF
THIS WEEKEND
by purchasing your "fuel" at 1
RALPH'S MARKET
(Formerly Freeman's)
709 Packard NO 2-3175
"Just two doors from the Blue Front"
J2
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Part time secretary. Hours
flexible. Pleasant surroundings. For a
non-profit organization. State quali-
fications, age and experience in first
letter. Write to The Michigan Daily,
Box 63. H8
MANAGEMENT TRAINING: Large East-
ern life insurance co. has opening in
local branch office for 2 men who
want to build careers in life under-
writing and agency management. Ex-
tensive training provided for those
who can qualify. Salary while in
training plus contract which assures
future financial security. Inquiries
treated confidentially. Write to The
Michigan Daily, Box 62. H5
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
S2
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
Sl
NEW ATLAS TIRES
"Gripsafe" in sets of 4; 4-670x15,
$58.75; 750x14, $74.95; (plus recap-
able tires and tax). Other sizes
comparably low. Tune-ups. Brake
service.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Cor. Main & Catherine NO 8-7717
S3
TRANSPORTATION
WOULD LIKE female rider to Texas
during first week of August. Call
NO 2-7386 after 6 P.M. G6
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Royal portable typewriter.
$35. NO 5-5986. B9

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
In thedBerlin crisis, Russia is
taking advantage of a Western
geographical weakness: the isola-
tion of West Berlin behind the
Iron Curtain.
But Russia also has a weak
point that the West could exploit
if it were of a mind to retaliate:
Albania.
Long a faithful member of the
Communist bloc, Albania is a

mountainous country the size of
Maryland with a population of
1'/2 million. It lies (see map) just
across the Adriatic Sea from the.
heel of the Italian boot, sand-
wiched between Yugoslavia on the
north and Greece on the south.
The nearest Russian satellite is
Bulgaria, 100 aerial miles across
Yugoslavia.
Little Value
Economically, Albania is worth
little. Strategically, it is far more

322 S. Main

NO 2-5667
X3

Complete line of HiFi components
Aincluding kits; complete service on
radio, phonographs and HiFi equip-
ments.
HI F1 STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
Phone NO 8-7942
X2

Like, where's the

darn house key.
Bill F16

' laG mits
-- lI1 o : I g 1"
' ba11e-.- z'% 1
Dre a'u A a
Adriatic ~
~- o
.rfrvsa.,[ 'kzt uhn. : . }t Agadee.
/as z e~lt A'".L B A N IA ? .y "".
14' aR i : 's-"^Y' _
repo(edL . ere;afse~
have bilt: E E
air fields and zroe
submarinze &GREEdE
b'ases on island Srne
of <S'az2', - .'.,
and miss ile = : ufij
launezeb~gsites "-_
near !Zona.
,.A..AAA~.A$.A.A..AA.A.4A.*AP' Newsfeatures
- 4 -
"srea /wwz ,, *
oan detailed ma "9Y .; ;.: :.3 .
.Sea is VIA4/A....3~ :
.s..
I~a~zj ALBANIA 'lE5
C~ dditerraxz~eazn 'ea~ ' san'of iQndii

valuable although obviously not
nearly as important to the Com-
munists as West Berlin is to the
West. Albania's value is that it
offers Russia a base on the Medi-
terranean, and there is evidence
Russia is taking advantage of the
offer.
Almost two years ago, the Lon-
don Daily Express quoted authori-
tative sources that "The Russians
have turned the island of Sazan
(off Albania's coast) into a f or-
tress. In the last few months five
new airfields for jet fighters and
fighter-bombers have been com-
pleted. Massive new submarine
pens have been completed.
A year ago, diplomatic inform-
ants in Washington said they had
information that Albanians had
closed off the area around the Al-
banian port of Valona to hide
mysterious construction. It was
assumed the Soviets were building
missile launching sites.
Complicated Move
Any attempt to isolate Albania
would be much more complicated
than a Communist blockade of
West Berlin. But their satellite is
geographically vulnerable:
1) All air routes to Albania from
the rest of the Communist bloc
pass over Greece, Turkey or Yugo-
slavia.
2) All heavy supplies must reach
Albania through the Mediterra-
nean and the Adriatic.
If Russia broke its international
agreements on Western access to
Berlin, it, is conceivable the West
could devise in retaliation some
method of "unofficially" block-
ading the narrow entrance to the
Adriatic, the 50-mile wide Strait
of Otranto.
The airlanes over Greece and
Turkey presumably could be con-
trolled, because these countries are
stalwart members of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO).
Yugoslavia is the question mark.
Strained Relations
However( relations between Yu-
goslavia and Albania have been
strained for years. From time to
time there have been land dis-
putes along their common border.
Albania has been among the
loudest critics of Marshall Tito's
independent brand of Communism.
Albania, alone among the Com-
munist bloc, failed to restore diplo-
matic relations wit?! Yugoslavia
when Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev made his first at-
tempt to bury the hatchet with
Tito after Stalin's death.
Last March, Yugoslavia officially
recalled its minister to Albania to
protest what it called Albanian
warmongering.
And Tito reportedly has been
quite disturbed by the construc-
tion of Soviet submarine bases on
Albania's Adriatic coast.
Ambassador
From India
Speaks Here
Mohammad Ali Currim Chagla,
Indian ambassador to the United
States, wll speak at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday in Trueblood Audi-
torium.
His remarks will precede the
screening of an Indian movie in
color, entitled "Pamposh," with
dialogue in English. Tickets will
cost 90 cents. Proceeds will be
turned over to the library fund of
the University Asian Studies Pro-
gram.
The function is being sponsored
by the University Indian Stu-
dents' Association.
Following the movie, Ambassa-
dor Chagla will attend a recep-
tion for foreign students given by

the International Center in the
Rackham Building at 10 p.m.

Besides establishing immediate
communication with his audience,
the playwright must put forth the'
basic truths which will make his
work important to later ages,
John Wray Young, director of the
Shreveport. (La.) Little Theater,
said yesterday.
Young, who is also president of
the American Educatiotial The-
ater Association, spoke at the
opening general session of the
University's Summer Speech Con-
ference.
The playwright doesn't have
the solace of thinking that if
present audiences do not like his
play, future ages will understand
it, Young declared.
Delicate Blend
"The theater is a contemporary
art," he said. "But it is a blend
of the timeless and the timely
which makes the master play-
wright a man of wonder and com-
munication in the theater trans-
cendent of time."
Young stressed that the play-
wright must do more than merely
hold the mirror up to his own day.
"A play concerned solely with
contemporary life is doomed to a
short life. A really good play must
be based on the basic truths com-
mon to all ,ages," he argued.
Views Experiments
Discussing experimental drama,
Young maintained, "I do not be-
lieve we can have an avant-garde
in the theater, as in the other
arts, with an isolated few claim-
ing to understand the play..I don't
think that future audiences with
their superior abilities will one
day catch on to experimental
plays that we now find 'difficult.'
"We have with us today, and
will always have with us, play-
wrights who seem to be a little
beyond their audiences," he com-
mented.
"At the moment they are chief-
ly found in the European theater.
Some of them are making con-
tact. But I don't go along with
the complete endorsement of their
work simply because it is new and
different."
Cites 'Godot'
He cited "Waiting for Godot"
by Samuel Beckett as a play that
has had much attention in our
F DIAL NO 2-2513

country. "But I do not like to see
our people go overboard about it
because it is not a perfect work,"
Young said.
"It's experimentation. A cen-
tury from now it may be 'found
as obscure as Browning's 'The
Blot in the Scutcheon'."
"Not that we don't need experi-
mental drama," Young added.
"Today we have as much freedom
as Shakespeare, Ibsen and Shaw
ever knew."
Emotional Impact
He asserted that the real rea-
son for the existence of theater is
the need for mutual emotional ex-
perience. "No other art form can
offer this so effectively," he said.
"The theatergoer senses his
participation with the group. He
knows his laughter and applause
are part of the creative impact.
And when he leaves the theater,
he feels his life is richer and hap-
pier and deeper than it was when
he came into the playhouse.
"Of course, this is not neces-
sarily so for everyone. Playgoing
is much more than the acquisition
of a ticket. There are those who
should not be allowed in the the-
ater," he argued.
"We donot expect everyone to
make contact with music, paint-
ing and sculpture. So why with
the theater? Participation de-
mands preparation and training.
Unless the theatergoer brings
something to the theater, he is not
likely to take anything away."
Haber Chosen
For Sessions
Prof. William Haber of the
University economics department,
and former University Prof. Rich-
ard Musgrave, now of Johns Hop-
kins University ,are among seven
high-ranking economists selected
by Gov. G. Mennen Williams for
a conference on national econom-
ic problems.
The group will meet with Gov.
Williams at a three-day confer-
ence later this month at his
Mackinac Island summer resi-
dence.
I~

ALLSTATE scooter and one,
motorbike. One Underwood
writer and Stromberg-Carlson
er encloser. NO 3-6520.

Italian
type-
speak-
B8

DIAL NO 8-6416
TWO ENCORES
SHOWARD HA S

I

CHESS ,SETS: 2 hand-carved Austrian
(figurines). One English ivory. One
German plastic (figurines). Call after
7, HUnter 2-4056. B6
LARGE COLLECTION of classical mu-
sic: piano, opera scores and organ.
Wide selection of Bach and Mozart.
Also Conn flute, $50. Call after 7,
HUnter 2-4056. B5
FOR SALE: % ton quiet, automatic
room air conditioner. Used 3 months.
Call NO 3-0047 after 5. B8

ENDING TODAY'
Call it the "Giant" of
Southern California!

It's Time for Summer, Time for Happiness

Read

Filmed in the Nada Valley
with all the boldness
of a "Peyton Place"
xfalSt~ir' I #1Y RBBINS TrEwpoeNICOLOR
A WSWsLUI4 fOM PTsoa /x * "A w4Tm ffpC4CInw
'i'Saturday ~
The Acclaimed
"ANATOMY OF A MURDER"
Michigan's Own Product

I

TIME FOR FUN.

I.

CINEMASCO'Pg *WAtI4ERCOLOR
AND --

Pal

ly

41GU.mLC.s i K.4LG LL;L v -M.

writ LL 41L"4AC AF

Classifieds

Organization
Notices

i: :
rj

Live, love, laugh and be happy
this summer in our wonderful
sportswear fashions. Bold and
exciting ideas, elegantly tailored
styles, bright and different
fashions from Koret of Califor-
nia and other fine makers.
Mix and match 'til your
heart's content. It's fun with
fashion! It's fashion at budget
prices!
The Blouses
of easy-care cottons
from 2.98
The Skirts from 5.95
Slacks, capris, shorts, too.

Join the
Music Center Record Club
SAVE 121/%
on your record purchases
NO CONTINUING OBLIGATIONS
We are now engaged in our
ANNUAL SPRING RECORD SALE
Save up to 40% on hundreds of LP's!
MUSIC CENTER
Closed Saturday Afternoons

Hillel Foundation, Sabbath Services,
July 10, 7:30 p.m., Zwerdling-Cohn
Chapel. Sunday Brunch, 11 a.m., fol-
lowed by swimming at nearby lake.
Reservations Hillel Office.

music SHOPS

-CAMPUS-,-
2111 S. State
NO 8-9013

--DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

Subscribe to
The Michigan
Daily

for the Finest in Recorded Music

I

You'll be sitting in the sun
countin' your money if you buy
your Vacation Clothes
at

to
ORCHESTRA-TYPE MUSIC
every night of the week
with our newly installed
STEREOPHONIC JUIE BOX
Come out and see this Completely Remodeled Club
FLOOR SHOWS
every FRIDAY and SATURDAY NIGHTS

~
e
.......
.,
.
:
J
" ..
"' ;"
V
i. :,
'11.t
l:
: v
J . "f
:., r: .
c:_?;;.
: :: r. ''r
:r. .. .a
'$ '. =
.j .: 1
.:, .r.

or the

&ride

. .0

Let us assist you with your plans
for that all important wedding day.

COME IN AND SEE OUR COMPLETE

main shop
on Forest
of rS.U.
opposite
Campus Theatre

Separates
at
Campus Togs
1111 S.U.

SELECTION OF CRANE'S.

* INVITATIONS
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