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June 23, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-06-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Summer Orientation
Enrollment Expands

DECLINE IN LEADERSHIP:
Fears Results of Present Tax Policies

Over half of the fall freshman
class will participate in the Uni-
versity's summer orientation pro-
gram and a new program for par-f
ents will be added on a trial basis'
this summer.1
About 1,700 prospective stu-
dents, representing approximately
55 per cent of the total freshman1
class, 'began trickling into Ann"
Arbor yesterday for two-day or-
ientation sessions which will con-
tinue through Aug. 14.
Last summer's participants
numbered 1,390 or 45 per cent of
the total, and this year's group
sets a record for the percentage of
freshmen attending the program,
now in its third year.
Parents' Meetings
Special meetings for parents of
the prospective students have
been scheduled for this week with
about 300 expected to attend.
The trial program will be held
from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on the third
floor of the Student Activities
Bldg., where parents will have the
opportunity to hear representa-
tives from the offices of the deans
of men and women, the academic
Music Group
Plans Three
Performances
The Stanley Quartet will offer
a series of three concerts for lis-
teners this summer, to be held at
8:30 p.m. July 1, 15 and 29 in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Members of the quartet are
Prof. Gilbert Ross and Gustave
Rosseels, violins; Prof. Robert
Courte, viola and Prof. Oliver
Edel, cello. Prof. Clyde Thompson,
double bass, will assist the group.
All are members of the music
school faculty.
For the July 1 program the
group will play "Quartet in G
major, K. 387' by Wolfgang Ama-
deus Mozart; "Quintet No. 2
(1952)" by Darius Milhaud, com-
missioned by the University and
dedicated to the Stanley Quartet
and "Quartet in D minor, Opus
posth. (Death and the Maiden)"
by Franz Schubert.
"Quartet in C major, Opus 50,
No. 2" by Franz Joseph Haydn
will be the opening selection in
the July 15 concert, followed by
"Quartet in A minor (For Jean on
her Birthday)." by Ralph
Vaughan-Williams and "Quartet
in F major, Opus '59, No. 1" by
Ludwig von Beethoven.
The concluding summer pro-
gram, July 29, will include "Ser-
enade in G major, K. 525 (ine
kleine Nachtmusik)" for two vio-
lins, viola, cello and double bass
by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart;
"Quartet in F major" by Maurice
Ravel and "Quartet No. 6" by
Bela Bartok.
The premiere performance' of
a new string quartet by the Amer-
ican composer, Elliott Carter, will
be presented by the Stanley Quar-
tet at the second of its two con-
certs scheduled for the fall semes-
ter, Dec. 15. The Carter- quartet
is the University's 1959 Chamber
Music Commission and is dedi-
cated to the Stanley Quartet.

counselors, Health Service and the
student body speak. Question-
and-answer sessions with the
speakers and other res o u r ce
people are also scheduled.
The students in groups of 50-60,
will spend their two-day orienta-
tion period receiving counseling,
selecting courses for the fall se-
mester, taking college and lan-
guage placement tests, having x-
rays taken and attending orienta-
tion meetings.
Fee Charged
Each participant is charged a
slight fee to cover room and board
in a University residence hall and
fees for student leaders and staff
personnel. The program is organ-
ized to give freshmen the oppor-
tunity to become better acquaint-
ed with student life on campus
before taking up residence in the
fall.
Freshmen not participating in
the summer schedule will return
for the regular fall orientation
period Sept. 14, with the summer-
oriented students joining them
the next day. For the remainder
of the week, both groups will take
part in a program of social orien-
tation.
About two-thirds of this year's
participants are from Michigan
with the rest coming from all over
the country, E. Jack Petoskey, di-
rector of orientation for the Office
of Registration and Records, said.
Last summer, 19 states were rep-
resented in the program.
Many out-of-sttae students,
Petoskey added, come to Ann Ar-
bor with their parents as part of
a vacation trip to Michigan.
Church Series
T o Consider
World Top ics
"Spectrum. of World Problems"
is the theme of the summer lec-
ture series which will be offered
by the First Unitarian Church.
The series of six lectures, be-
ginning Sunday, June 28, will deal
with selected problems of Asia,
Africa and the United States. All
programs, open tothe public, will
begin at 8 p.m.
The opening lecture, which will
be delivered by L. A. Peter Gos-
ling of the geography depart-
ment, will deal with "Problems of
Rural Development in Southeast
Asia."
On July 5, Prof. Douglas D.
Crary of the geography depart-
ment will present an "African
View."
"Some Pr o b l e m s Associated
with our Increasing Exposure to
Irradiation" will be presented by
Prof. James V. Neel, chairman of
the human genetics department
on July 12. On July 19, Prof.
Donald Livingstone of the mathe-
matics department will deal with
"Some Problems in. Adjustment
to Western Ways of Life in the
South African Bantu."
Prof. H. A. Gleason, Jr., pro-
fessor of linguistics at Hartford
Seminary Foundation, will dis-
cuss "Language Pioneering in
Africa" on July 26.
The series will close on Aug. 2,
with a talk on "Manpower Prob-
lems in Medical Education" by
Prof. Robert G. Lovell, assistant
dean of the medical school.
Kauper Named
Law* Editor

Present tax policies handicap
United States industry in main-
taining technological leadership
among the major industrial na-
tions of theworld, Michigan busi-
nessmen were told Monday.
Addressing a summer manage-
ment conference in St. Clair
sponsored by the University,
Michigan State University, and
Wayne State University, Ralph
E. Cross declared:
Slow Recovery'
"Capital recovery (of funds
spent for improved plant and
equipment) in the U.S. is the
slowest of any industrial country
in the world. It takes from 12 to
30 years torecover funds invested
in machine tools in the U.S., as
opposed to four to eight years
in the industrial countries of
Europe."
Schedule Talks
On Language
Placements

Cross is executive vice-president
of The Cross Co., Detroit, manu-
facturer of automated machine
tools and other equipment. He
spoke following a banqet session
at the St. Clair Inn, opening the
three-day conference.
Cross said U.S. industry must
'invest $40 billion annually in
'plant and equipment to maintain
present jobs and provide work for
400,000 new persons entering the
labor force each year.
"Every new job costs from
$12,000 to $15,000 each, and every
job in existence requires an ex-
penditure of $450 annually (in
plant an dequipment) to keep it
alive," he noted.

country that gets the taxes and
job opportunities, not for a year
but for the life of the plant," he
said.
Cross listed four ways to fur-
ther technological advances in
the U.S.: continued expansion of
research (now a $10 billion an-
nual industry), revised tax poli-
cies on depreciation of industrial
plant and equipment, increased
productivity, and stepped up in-
centives for individual success.
At present, he estimated about
25 per cent of the nation's pro-
ductive potential is lost because
of "feather-bedding" by employes.
Schedule Film
On Wednesday
Films on community organiza-
tion will be screened at seven p.m.
Wednesday in the School of
Social Work auditorium, Frieze
Building.
The showing is being conducted
in connection with the seminar
on Community development in
newly developing countries cur-
rently being led by Prof. Arthur
Dunham of the social work
school.

Opposes Expansions
The Detroit executive warned
that America is pricing itself out
of world markets. He expressed
particular concern with the trend
of U.S. firms to build plants in
foreign countries in an effort to
maintain their market position.
"When a company invests some
of its capital in plant and ma-
chinery to make a new product,
it establishes a reservoir of future
profits, taxes and job opportuni-
ties that are consumed over a
period of years. When that plant
is built in a foreign country in-
stead of the U.S., it's the foreign

Teachers of French, Latin, Ger-
man and Spanish from all parts
of the country will participate in
the School College Conference on
Advanced Placement in Foreign
Languages, Thursday through
Sunday.
Along with the literary college,
the College Entrance Examina-
tion Board and Ann Arbor High
School are sponsoring the con-
ference. The 150' teachers expect-
ed to attend will be housed in
South Quadrangle during the
meeting.
This will be the fifth annual
meeting of high school and col-
lege foreign language teachers
concerned with advanced place-
ment.
The purpose of the conference
is to discuss recent developments
in the Advanced Placement Pro-
gram in Foreign Languages, col-
lege-level language courses in the
secondary school for the superior
student, the actions and attitudes
of colleges toward a d v a n C e d
placement, and other topics of
interest to language teachers.
Registration for the conference
will beginatn3 p.m. Thursday,nat
the west entrance of South Quad-
rangle.
At the opening general session
Thursday night, Dean Roger W.
Heyns of the literary college will
welcome the participants, and
George Hanford, vice-president
and treasurer of the College En-
trance Examination Board will
give the. keynote address on "Fu-
ture Concerns."
The remainder of the confer-
ence will be devoted to five sep-
arate sectional meetings for each
language group. In charge of the
arrangements for the meetings is
a committee headed by Prof. Law-
rence B. Kiddle of the romance
languages department.
Air-Conditioned, comfort is yours
while having your hair cut
in the latest styles
715 North University

Egg, Toast, J'elly-
Chatter
RED'S RITE SPOT
517 East William

to
ORCHESTRA-TYPE MUSIC
every night of the week
with our newly installed
STEREOPHONIC JUKE BOX
Come out and see this Completely Remodeled Club
FLOOR SHOWS
every FRIDAY and SATURDAY NIGHTS
REUEL KENYON .
and his ORCHESTRA
playing every weekend
American Legion4
1035 S. Main---Phone..NO 8-6141

I/

Si

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-i- -

[

Engagements

MICHIGAN UNION

LIFE GUARD: weekends. Call UPtown
8-9715, Mrs. Markowitz or Mr. Bolton.
H3
WANTED
Two mechanicai engineers for post-
tions ieading to shop management
and sales management posts with
*Detroit company.
This division of 500 employees
needs M.E. graduates to strengthen
existing organization and to sup-
port expanding market diversifica-
tion program. Will start at $450
month as assistants to works man-
ager as shirt sleeve line men. This
is not a training program. Plant
produces rolied-formed, cold-formed,
and stamped components for auto-
motive, appliance and all other in-
dustries. Applicant must be in top
20 per cent of class, preferably have
a minor in humanities, engaged or
married and have desire to work
and ambition to grow with small
metal forming industrial manufac-
turer. Write to The Michigan Daily,
Box 60. H1

ALL CAMPUS MIXER
(STAG or DRAG).

ON CAMPUS: A nice two room, fur-
nished, all utilities, private bath,
additional services. $80; with garage,
$88.50. NO 8-7234. C2
SUMMER AND FALL: ?s block from
U. High, 2 blocks from campus, re-
frigerator available, free off street
parking, weekly cleaning, storage
space. Student Management. Singles
-$10; doubles--$7.50; 2 room suite
(3 or 4) $6.50. 701 S. Forest, NO 2-9301.
C3
AT 1011 E. UNIVERSITY, student rooms.
For men at summer rates. Singles and
double. Phone after 5 P.M. NO 8-8681.
C4
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom home, com-
pletely furnished, near campus. Im-
mediate possession to September 1.
Call NO 8-7490. C8

GOLDEN'S SERVICE STATION

601 Packard

NO 8-9429
S3

SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 9-12 P.M.

NEW CARS

s t

English
L-ind
* A Ford Product
1 14 models to choose from
*Prices start $1474

Thomas E. Kauper, '60L, has
been selected Editor-in-Chief of
next year's Michigan Law Review.
Associate Editors are: Dean L.
Berry, Lawrence E. Blades, Roger
W. Findley, E. Roger Frisch, Don-
ald R. Joliffe and Stevan Uzelac,
all '60L.

BLASER-JOHNSON ORCH.
UNION BALLROOM
-AIR CONDITIONED
$1.00 PER PERSON

- - - - - - - - - -

$55 FURNISHED APT.
3 blocks from State Theatre. One
room and kitchen, and private bath.
Call NO 2-7274. C

Cs Up to 35 miles per gallon

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED
SUBJECTS NEEDED
for psychological experiments at the Mental Health Re-
se'rch Institute. $1.00-$1.25 per hour.
Applications are available in Rm. 1020 of the Ad-
ministration Bldg., or call NO 3-1531, Ext. 387.
)H2

* Easy Parking and Driving
r Good Trade-in Allowance
FITZGERALD,
INC.'
LINCOLN-MERCURY
EDSEL ENGLISH FORD
3345 Washtenaw
Phone NO 3-4197
vi
USED CA RS
1958 VOLKSWAGON, light gray, ex-
cellent condition. Best offer takes.
NO 3-1426. Ni

0

ERSTOCIK

S

L E

JANET SHEW
Shew-Steri ing
Mr. and Mrs. Earl W. Shew an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Janet, to Joseph W.
Sterling, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Sterling.
Both are from Monroe, Mich.
Miss Shew is a 1959, graduate of
the University education school.
She was/ president of the Alice
Lloyd council during 1957-58,^and
a member of Circle, women's resi-
dence hall honorary.
No wedding date has yet been
announced.

of

RECORDS

POPS and CLASSICS

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MR& ON h AnoniA

A FINE SELECTION FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE

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