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July 30, 1959 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1959-07-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1939

-

I

ro Golf Classic
'o Begin Today

SENATE TESTIMONY:
Frick Promises Help
To New Third League

I

*Eflar

A.

t, ,;I

i .

MICHIGAN DAILY.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

MINNEAPOLIS (P) - One of
ie greatest fields of pro golfers
er assembled - possibly the
'eatest -- will face the challenge
narrow fairways and hard-
iked greens at the Minneapolis
olf Club today in the 41st Pro-
ssional Golfers Association '
iampionship. - j
Among the 174 who checked in
isterday to complete the un-
mually big field are at least two
zen players capable of winningj
ts or almost any tournament.
ne of them who is best able to
ep his drives straight and sink
e tough putts will emerge Sun-
iy as champion. Pulling names
it of a hat is as good a way as
my of trying to pick a winner.
The PGA is no longer the af-
,ir of eye-popping upsets and
rambling victories that it was
. the match play era that ended
vo years ago. Over 72 holes of
roke competition experience and1
lf skill are bound to tell. 1
Three scorching days with temn-
eratures in the 90d have left the
eens rock hard and lightning
.st. The narrow fairways put a
emium on accurate driving, but7
e 6,850-yard par 35-35-70
urse isn't one where even a long
iver can get home with a wedge
a most of the par 4 holes. It's
garded as the best test thePGA
urnament has offered since the
urnamnent has played at Oak-
ont, Pa., in 1950.
The weatherman took a hand'
i the proceedings yesterday by
recasting that the heat would'
bate and that the wind would
vitch to northwest for today's7
peping round. If it does, the
ayers who have been practicing'
ligently through the hamid
uth winds virtually will be start-'
g from scratch in learning the
nurse. Wind direction has an im-
ortant bearing on scores on the
evated, fairly open Minneapolis'
>urse.
Some holes which have been

tough in practice, such as the
466-yard first, a hard par 4
against the south wind, will be
made easier and the players will
be bucking the wind on the 17th
and 18th.
The field ranges from such old
timers as Gene Sarazen, who has
won the PGA title three times and
Denny Shute, who has won twice,
down to 17 specially invited non-
members, most of whom are play-:
ing in the PGA for the first time.1

WASHINGTON (P) - Baseball
Commissioner Ford C. Frick yes-
terday pledged full support of
present major leagues for those
building a third bigtime circuit.
Sen. John Carroll (D-Colo.) told
Frick, in effect, it better be that
way or Congress may step in.
Discussion of the projected third
league - the Continental - arose
while Frick was testifying before
the Senate Antimonopoly Subcom-
mittee. The Senate group is study-
ing bills that would clarify the
status of pro baseball, football,
basketball and hockey under the

SEN. ESTES KEFAUVER
...questions Frick

PLEDGES FULL SUPPORT:
Bell To Meet New Football League

PHILADELPHIA ()-Commis-
sioner Bert Bell. of the National
Football League said yesterday he
expects to meet with representa-
tives of a proposed new pro foot-
ball league either tonight or to-
morrow.
Bell,who stopped at his office
here enroute from Washington to
his vacation home in Atlantic City,
N.J., said the conference probably
would be at the seashore resort.
Repeats Statement
Reiterating the statement he
made before the Senate Antimono-
poly Committee in Washington
Tuesday that a new league would
be healthy for pro football, Bell
said:
"The more teams and the more
competition the better."
He insisted that the only name
he knew in connection with the
new league was that of Davey
O'Brien, former Texas Christian
passer who played for Bell when
the Commissioner owned the Phil-
adelphia Eagles.
Bell said he understood the
name of the proposed league was
Trans - America Conference. He
said the most important thing for
these people is to get men with

pro football background, and a'
knowledge of television and radio
to run the clubs.
Need Experience
"One of the main reasons for
the failure of the old All-America
Conference was that it was run
largely by people who knew noth-
ing about pro football," Bell said.
The Commissioner said he wasn't
concerned about competition for
players.
"There is enough in the way of
talent from the colleges for all of
us," he asserted. "After all, only
three to five new players a year
make our teams."
The Commissioner went on to
say:
Will Take Time
"It will take a new league sev-
eral years to build up teams to
match the NFL in equal competi-
tion on the field.
"We are not afraid of their tele-
vising games into our territories.
We know from experience that
home team attendance stands up
against such competition. If the
team is playing away, the telecast
of its game back home gets the,
highest rating."
Bell said he did not know exactly
what the new group wanted from

losensohn StillAiming at Se 22
?'or PattersonmJ'ohansson Rematch

him, although he surmised it had
to do with advice on setting up
regulations, handling officials, con-
tracts and other such problems.
Sees' No Disputes
He felt there would be no argu-
ments over player contracts such
as those with the All - America
Conference and more recently the
Canadian League.
"The important thing is that we
all recognize each other's con-
tracts," he said.
Opposing or competing with a
new league is nothing new to the
Commissioner. He led the strategy
that broke up the war between the
NFL and AAC in the late 1940s,
and led the cream of the AAC
teams into the NFL.
Yamanaka
TopsRecord
In Dual Meet
KURE, Japan OP)-Tsuyoshi Ya-
manaka, Japan's speedy middle
and long distance swimmer, shat-
tered the world record for the 800
meter freestyle yesterday for the
second time within eight days.
Competing in a dual meet with
a hand-picked United States team,
Yamanaka clocked 9 minutes, 13.3
seconds in the Kure City High
School pool. This clipped 1.2 sec-
onds off the 9:14.5 mark set by
Jon Konrads of Australia last year.
Konrads, however, has an un-
recognized record of 8:59.6 made
earlier this year.
Yamanaka also. swam the 800
meters faster in the Tokyo meet
against the visiting United States
team earlier when he clocked
9:09.7. Murray Rose of Australia,
a student at Southern California,
did not participate in the race yes-
terday although he is here as a
guest of the Japan-United States
friendship meets.
George Breen of Indianapolis,
America's Olympic star, was second
to Yamanaka in 9:32.3. Third
place went to Japan's Takezo
Umemoto in 9:37.4 followed by
Hiroshi Ishii in 9:43.2.
United States swimmers won
four of the seven events-the 100-
meter freestyle, 100-meter back-
stroke, 200-meter freestyle and the
400-meter medley relay.
Rose took the 400 meter free-
style in 4 minutes, 26.6 seconds,
beating out Tatsuo Fujimoto of
Japan and Eugene Lenz of Santa
Maria, Calif., who were second and
third, respectively.

antitrust laws.
The baseball commissioner sup-
ported a measure that would ex-
empt such pro practices as the
player draft and contract reserve
clauses from the antitrust laws.
Under the bill, the strictly com-
mercial aspects of the sports would
be subject to those laws.
'Not Easy'
Frick told the Senators he wants
to see formation of a third big
league, but he cautioned it will
"not be simple and not be easy."
He said it will take "planning
and scheming to bring it about."
As evidence that the National
and American Leagues want to
help, Frick mentioned a meeting
set for Aug. 18 at which he said
founders of the Continental League
and a seven-man committee from
the National and American loops
will talk over all problems openly
and fully.
The baseball commissioner called
this meeting an honest endeavor
to help the new league get off the
ground. He said its founders would
be furnished every, bit of informa-
tion to help them.
Blocking Inadvisable
Carroll broke in to say he would
consider it most inadvisable for the
16 American and National League
clubs to block formation of a third
league. The Colorado Senator said
that if any barriers were thrown
up by the two existing major
leagues, Congress would be forced
to act.
Frick asked that baseball be left
to work out the problem itself,
without interference from Con-
gress.
Kefauver Curious
Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.)
voiced curiosity as to where the
new league would get its players.
He has contended the present ma-
jor teams have tied up many more
players than they rightfully need,
and he has proposed fixing an 80-
player limit for each club.
In response to Kefauver's ques-
tion, Prick said the new league
would enter organized baseball
with all the development rights
available to existing clubs.
T'o Choose
Wres tlers
EAST LANSING () - The na-
tion's top amateur wrestlers meet
at Michigan State University here
today through Saturday in try-
outs for the Pan American Games
at Chicago.
More than 100 wrestlers are
competing _for the eight first
places and alternates on the
United States team.
The field includes a score of
NCAA and NAAU champions plus.
members of past Pan American
and Olympic wrestling teams.
They range in age and experi-
ence from high schoolers to Dr.
M. A. Northrup of the San Fran-
cisco Olympic Club, who admits
to being past 50. Northrup has
won several NAAU championships
and was a member of both the
1951 and 1955 Pan American
teams.
The contestants vary in weight
from Dick Wilson of Toledo Uni-
versity, NAAU 1141/ pound titlist,
to Dave Behrman, 275 pound
Michigan State aspirant in the
heavyweight bracket.

FOR RENT
SMALL 3 room house, one block from
campus. Furnished. Reasonable. Also
rooms for men. Call NO 2-6094 in P.M.
C39
TWO ROOMS and bath furnished -
close to campus and downtown. Air
conditioned, laundry facilities, T.V.
antennae, off street parking, clean--
just redecorated. Utilities except elec-
tricity. $75 month. Call, NO 3-5532
after 6 P.M. C40
E. UNIV.-CHURCH--FOREST. Attrac-
tive furnished apartments for one to
four students, available Sept. $80-$170.
NO 3-2800. C38
7 ROOMS
Partly furnished, 2nd floor apart-
ment. Kitchen facilities. 4th Ave.
at Liberty. Call NO 2-0251 after 5
P.M., NO 2-4805 after 6 P.M. C37
CAMPUS ROOMS for graduate men.
Linen furnished. NO 2-1958 after 5
and week-ends. C34
$45 FURNISHED APT.
3 blocks from State Theater. For
summer. Call NO 2-7274. C36
ONE ROOM studio for bachelor girl,
in lovely campus area, furnished,
complete community kitchen. NO 2-
6987. C33
NEAR CAMPUS. Single rooms for male
students. Call after 4:30 P.M. NO
2-4049, 606 S. Division. C32
DELUXE 3 room furnished apartment
includes heat and water. Semi-private
bath facilities. $90 a month. NO
2-9020. C27
ROOMS FOR RENT for girls. % block
from campus. 1218 Washtenaw. NO
8-7942 for arrangements. C12
ONE BLOCK from campus, modern apts.
514 So. Forest. NO 8-7089 or 3-3280.
C1
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Try Hammond's new play time plan.
Includes organ in your home for 30
days with 6 free lessons in our
studio for only $25.
Rent a Spinet piano of your own
choice-$10 per month.
GRINNELL S
322 S. Main NO 2-5667
X3
Complete line of HiFi components
including kits; complete service on
radio, phonographs and HiFi equip-
ments.
HI Fl STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
Phone NO 8-7942
X2

TRANSPORTATION
NEED RIDER for drive to Berkley, Calif.
Aug. 17, Paul, NO 2-1604. G7
USED CARS
1957 VOLKSWAGON, sedan, good condi-
tion. Beige, white walls, radio. NO
3-9012. N34
1958 SIMCA $1,195
Mich. European Car Corp.
Liberty at Ashley NO 5-5800
N33
1953 V.W., Mint condition. $695. FI
9-0767, Northville. N32
1958 AUSTIN-HEALY, 6-cylinder, 4-seat,
show-room condition. NO 2-1294.
N30
KARMANN-GHIA, '58 VW sport coupe.
Beige,corduroy upholstery. 17,000
miles and in top condition. Call NO
3-0105. N27
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
82
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
81
TIRE SALE
Good prices for used tires qn
trade-ins: Complete Tune-up Serv-
ice available.
GOLDEN'S SERVICE STATION
601 Packard NO 8-9429
83
FOR SALE
DIAMOND, % carat. Reasonably priced.
Call NO 3-6897 after 6 P.M. B15
PORTABLE Smith - Corona typewriter,
excellent condition. $60. NO 2-2521,
Room 3322 after 6 P.M. B14
3 SIAMESE kittens, male and female,
about 4 months old. Also stud service.
Phone NO 2-9020. B12
FOR SALE: % ton quiet, automatic
room air conditioner. Used 3 months.
Call NO 3-0047 after 5. B8
Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising

'INES
2
3
4

I DAY
.80
.96
1.12

3 DAYS
2.00
2.40
2.80

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

6 DAYS
2.96
3.55
4.14

BARGAIN CORNER
BEST SUMMER BUYS: Men's skip-dent
short sleeve sport shirts, 97c. Assorted
colors, sanforized, washable. Sam's
store, 122 E. Washington. W2
PERSONAL
MAHALIA JACKSOpT-Ann Arbor High,
Sept. 26 - Saturday. 8:30 P.M. Tickets
on sale at Bob Marshall's Book Store.
F28
BUSINESS SERVICES
PRECISION
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
Beautiful styling .
GERMAN OLYMPIA
SWISS HERMES
ITALIAN OLIVETTI
SMITH-CORONA
and the
Smith-Corona Electric Portable
ONE YEAR GUARANTEE
MORRI LL'S
314 South State NO 3-2481
Jlo
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J5
HOME LATE?
CUPBOARDS BARE?
You can shop at Ralph's 'till 12
midnight for all grocery supplies.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
"Just two doors from the Blue Front"
J
HELP WANTED
FOR WOMAN STUDENT - Attractive
room and breakfasts in return for
light housekeeping duties., Available
now. Mrs. Louise Rice, NO 8-8491.
H27
WANTED: Finnish speaking student to
assist in language tutoring. NO 2-2137.
126
STUDENTS: Extra money and easy
come. Take subscriptions for easy-to-
sell publication. Your commission is
higher than you think. Every church
family a likely prospect. Write Box
474, Ann Arbor. H22
FOR FALL and spring semesters, girl
student to work in private home in
exchange for room and board. NO
3-8810. H18
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Young woman
25-40 to train for assistant director
in Home for teen-age school girls.
Resident position. Non-smoker pre-
ferred. Undergraduate considered.
Write to: Miss Esther Bain, 548 East
Grand Blvd., Detroit 7, Michigan.
H23
PART-TIME help for balance of sum-
mer school and part-time in the fal.
Apply in person after 1 P.M. Drakes'
Sandwich Shop, 709 North University.
H24
NEED MAN with first class engineering
license in radio. Also for on the air
part-time only, available at prsent.
NO 3-0569. H21
MATURE WOMEN: Do you need extra
money? Call NO 2-5274. H19
HOUSEWIVES: Would you like to add
to your fanly income? Call NO 2-
5274. 1H2

}y.

ii

I

Y'

NEW YORK (P)-Promoter Bill
Rosensohn returned from Sweden
yesterday and said Sept. 22 at Yan-
kee Stadium is still the target for
the return bout between Heavy-
weight Champion Ingemar Jo-
hansson and Floyd Patterson.
"All I need is six weeks," the
dapper young ring impresario said.
"If we can get a few kinks ironed
out next week we will go ahead
with those plans. If not, maybe we
can make it later in the month.
"It looks as if the Yankees won't
be making the World Series. That
gives us more dates to work with."
Rosensohn insisted that his visit
Sad Janin
Receives Aid
WESTBURY, N.Y. (M)-"Jamin,
he is happy now again," said Jean
Riaud, driver of the French trot-
ting champion.
Jamin got his favorite food,
artichokes, after a special ship-?
ment from California arrived by
plane yesterday morning.
The French horse arrived in
New York July 19, along with
other European horses for the $50,-
000 International Trot at Roose-
velt Raceway Saturday night.
His artichokes, along with feed,
hay and grain of all the horsesI
was taken by the Department of,
Agriculture. Later the supplies
were released, but the artichokes
were lost.1
When word got out about Ja-
mmi's plight-he was off his feed
and sad, said Riaud-there was a
big response. Many wanted to help,
and 120 pounds of artichokes were
flown here Tuesday night from
San Francisco.1
They were picked up by heli-
copter, and flown from the air-
port to Roosevelt Raceway, and1
Jamin dug into them at 11 a.m.,
"Jamin.. he will eat about five
of them a day," Riaud said, "along
with his other food. We have1
enough. Yes, yes, I think he will
be all right. I shall train Jamin a1
mile and a half tomorrow morn-
ing, and after that I shall know
if everything is all right."
"I thank everyone for all thet
help which gets the artichokes fort
Jamin," said Riaud.
"I am grateful to the American
public which treated me so well."

n

to Sweden cemented his relation-
ship with the Swedish challenger.
"Ingemar is ready to come over
and start preparations when I say
the word," Rosensohn said. "First,
he wants an accounting of his ra-
dio and closed circuit TV receipts.
"For some mysterious reason
this hasn't been given him. He's a
shrewd business man. His attitude
is: why should he sign for a second
fight before he learns how much
money he made in the first?"
Purse Held
The some $80,000 purse which
Johansson got for stopping Pat-
terson in the third round June 26
at Yankee Stadium is held under
a federal writ of attachment be-
cause of the suit by Eddie Machen.
That purse comes from the gate
receipts. Machen contends he had
been 'promised a return fight by
Johansson.
The closed circuit TV was han-
dled by TelePrompTer, which Ro-
sensohn says hasn't issued an ac-
counting.
The promoter said he and Jo-,
hansson had two pleasant days to-
gether in Goteborg and he added:
"I still have a tremendous faith
in that boy. I'm not worried at
all."
Wants Return
As for reports that the return
bout may be delayed until early
next year because of tax con-
siderations, Rosensohn said:
"Ingemar asked me what Pat-
terson would think about holding
the fight next year. I told him
Floyd wanted to get the return
bout as soon as possible. Ingemar
told me: 'Okay, whatever you say
is all right with me.'"
Rosensohn said he felt that the
visit of Irving Kahn, President of
TelePrompTer, to Swenden prior
to his own visit was designed to
TelePrompTer, to Sweden prior
tional efforts.
"Kahn told Ingemar a lot of
things which seemed to confuse
him," the promoter added. "But
when I put Ingemar straight,
everything seemed to be all right."
Rosensohn made no attempt to
hide the fact that there was quite
a bit of maneuvering going on in
connection with the proposed re-
turn bout.
Rosensohn was forced to accept
TelePrompTer for the closer TV
circuit deal in the first fight even
though he himself was cut out of
the proceeds.
After Johansson had won in a
staggering surprise, Rosensohn said
significantly: "Now I'm the boss."

Rosensohn said he had no con-
tract with Johansson beyond the
next fight but he was sure no one
else did, either. "We have an un-
derstanding with each other," he
added.

I

SMOKERS
Smokers who smoke cigarettes needed for be-
havioral study. $1.25 per hour. Call 3-1531, ext.
387 or sign up in the Personnel Office, Rm. 1020,
Administration Bldg.

H13

r

INGEMAR JOHANSSON
. . . agrees to rematch

WOULD OPPOSE KRAMER:

AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT

4

Miss Gibsoi
NEW YORK (I)-Althea Gibson
may turn professional in the fall
to head an all-women's tennis tour
operating in competition with Jack
Kramer's famous cast.
"Everything is in an 'iffy' stage
at the moment but the tennis tour
idea still is very much in the pic-
ture," the two-time Wimbledon
champion said yesterday after be-
ing honored as the 1958 Woman
Athlete of the Year.
"The present thinking is for a
lineup of four women players.
They would not be established pro-
fessionals but would be girls picked
from the present amateur ranks."

r May Form Pro Group

/2

PRICE Specials

Miss Gibson, winner of the
Wimbledon and United States
women's tennis titles in 1957 and
1958, took a year's leave after the
Forest Hills tournament last year
to promote her biography and
singing album.
Didn't Defend
She attended Wimbledon this
year as a special correspondent
for an English newspaper and

watched Maria Bueno of Brazil
win the title she did not defend.
"Maria played beautifully," Al-
thea said. "I was surprised. I
thought either Darlene f Hard or
Beverly Fleitz might win."
Althea said plans for a profes-
sional tour depend only on lining
up the player personnel. "Money
isn't an object-we have backers,"
she said.

x

BLEAMASTER THIRD:
Miller, Lambert Place
One-Two in Pentathlon

Not Identified
Althea declined to identify the
possibilities but her longtime ad-
visor, Sydney Llewellyn, said Brit-
ain's towering Christine Truman
was a candidate as well as Ameri-
can stars Beverly Fleitz and Dar-
lene Hard.
Miss Gibson was presented the
Babe Didrikson Zaharias Trophy
in an informal ceremony at the
137th Street Y.W.C.A., not far
from the spot where Althea first
learned the game by playing with
wooden paddles in the streets.
Ted Smits, Sports Editor of the
Associated Press, made the pre-
sentation indbehalf of the sports
writers and broadcasters who
named Atha in the a'n..nnin A'f

57 WASH and WEAR
SUMMER SUITS
PRICE
114 SUMMER and WINTER
SSLACKS
~I: ZPRICE
ALL SWIM TRUNKS

'4

t

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (A') -- A
junior high school teacher and a
student of social psychology fin-
ished one-two in the NationalI
Pentathlon Championships which£
ended yesterday with the 4,000-
meter cross-country run.
Robert Miller, an English andI
history instructor in Seattle, Wash.,c
won the top position with a grand2
total of 4,865 points.George Lam-
bert, a student of Waseda Uni-
versify in Tokyo, was second with

ing for a doctorate at the Tokyo
University.
Third high man was Sp. 4.C. Les
Bleamaster of Downey, Calif., who
earned 4,532 points in riding, fenc-
ing, shooting, swimming and run-
ning.
A former Olympic half-miler,
Lt. Arnie Sowell of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
copped the final event, running the
2%-mile course at Ft. Sam Hous-
ton in 14:21 minutes for 1,117
points.
Second in the rugged run went

r

Major League Standings

i

U

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