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June 24, 1958 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

sic Grout
Perform
Today

BOLIVIAN STUDENT:
Elba O jara Discusses Social Work

F - ~i

By JANE MCCARTI4Y

Baroque Trio Concert
To Feature Haugh
'he University Baroque Trio
-forms at 8:30 p.m. today in
ckham Lecture Hall with Prof.
rold Haugh of the School of
sic appearing as featured tenor.
he concert is, open to the pub-
without charge.
carry Dunscombe, Grad., will
st the trio by playing the vio-
cello. Members of the Baroque
o are Prof. Nelson Hauenstein,
e, Prof. Florian Mueller, oboe,
Prof. Marilyn Mason, harpsi-
rd, all members of the School
MIusic faculty.
'orks to be performed by the
include "Trio Sonata in D" by
ssandro Stradella; "Sonata in
or Oboe and Harpsichord" by
>ert Valentine; "Trio Sonata in
by Johann Sebastian Bach and
nata in E Minor for Flute and
'psichord" by Bach.
rof. Haugh, who has appeared
ti iajor orchestras and choral
leties in the United States, will
g the aria, "My Jesus is My
ting Joy" by Dietrich Buxte-
[e and "Cantata" by Heinrich
iutz.
leary Grants,
ames A. Lewis, University vice-
sident in charge of student af-
s, received an honorary de-
e from Cleary College, Ypsi-
ti, recently.
wen J. Cleary, college presi-"
t, coniferred a doctor of science
business administration degree;
Lewis at the school's' 75th an-
ersary commencement.
idge James R. Breakey, Jr.,
the Washtenaw county circuit
rt, was one of four others pre-
ted with similar degrees on the
te occasion.

PROF. FREDERICK SMITH
.. . 'outstanding teacher'
Smith Wins
Recog nition
As Teacher
Prof. Frederick E. Smith of the
zoology department received the
10th annual Literary and Educa-
tion Class of 1923 award for his
"outstanding qualities as a teach-
er" June-12.
The award cited Prof. Smith's
"sympathetic understanding as a
counseior of students, significant
contributions to the educational
growth of the college, and the
scholarly integrity which under-
lies his service to the college and
University."
Established by the Literary Class
of 1919, the award, which consists
of a c itation and $1,000, was later
taken over by the combined liter-
ary and education classes of 1923.'
Prof. Smith was graduated from
Massachusetts State College, and
did graduate work at the Univer-
sity of Vermont Medical School
and Yale University.
He joined the University fac-
ulty in 1950, and has served as
junior-senior counselor in zoology
and on the zoology 'department
executive committee, literary col-
lege administrative board and the
literary college honors council.

"The philosophy and techniques
of social work are universally sim-
ilar," Elba Ojara, Spec., a social
worker from Bolivia, said.
"You have to keep in mind the
personalities of your clients," she
explained, "believe in their poten-
tialities and believe that they can
solve their own problems. But you
still must manipulate them some-
times, for often they don't know
quite what they want," she said.
Miss Ojara has been studying at
the School of Social Work since
last September on aUnited Nations
scholarship. "When I return to my
country I can work for the United
Nations in community develop-
ment, but I am not sure what I
will be doing," she said.A former
teacher of social work at the 10-
year-old School of Social Work in
La Paz, Miss Ojara explained that
there are many positions open for
social workers in Bolivia.
Programs Different
The differences between social
work in the United States and in
Bolivia are, she said, "mainly in
programs of social welfare. We
have to keep cultural background
in mind."
"In the United States, social
work is deeply rooted in case work.
In Bolivia we use case work in
many areas, but mainly need to
work with groups.
"Half of our population is rural,"
she continued. "For many years
the governments did not pay much
attention to these people. They
just worked the land and had no
rights as individuals. We are now
undergoing a social and economic
transformation in my country,<and
the government Is trying to im-
prove these people's way of living.
Based on Case Work
"In the United States," Miss
Ojara said, "the standard of living
is very different. Case work is
based more on trying to give ther-
apy through interviews than on
trying to give physical aid., In

Bolivia our clients are not very
very poor, but they do not have
the same comforts, and we must
deal first with economic problems,
and then with maladjustment.
"Studying here at the Univer-
sity, I have gained in professional
experience," she said, "and I have
learned to think, and to make1
analyses. I have learned that
change must be more evolutionary
than revolutionary. We thought
that things could be changed over-
night."
"At home," Miss Ojara explain-
ed, "the people have no patience.
They want thingsrdone right away,
We knew we weren't doing well,
but we had to fit our programs to
this side of the people. Many of
our programs failed because they
were done in a hurry without
sound planning and analysis."
"The School of Social Work here
Ford Awards
Given to Elight
Eight University students and
one faculty member have been
awarded Ford Foundation fellow-
ships.
Prof. Wilford J. Eiteman of the
business administration school re-
ceived a faculty research fellow-
ship to study factors affecting en-
trepreneurial decisions in the
modern corporation.
Graduate students awarded fel-
lowships were:
William Dillion, Thomas Dyck-
man, Kenneth Weller, Earl Spiller,
Donald Cowar, Martin David, Bri-
an Dixon and Karl Roskamp.
Air-conditioned comfort is yours
while having your hair cut
n the latest styles
715 North University

has a very high standard of teach-
ing," she said. "As a former pro-
fessor in my own country I realize
and have learned how to teach
better in order to help students
learn to think rather than to be
just theoretical social workers. We
have to be realistic, too," she de-
clared.
Often when international stu-
dents come to the United States
"we think it is very different from
our own cultural backgrounds,"
Miss Ojara said, "but it isn't. We
have many misconceptions. You'
have freedom to do whatever you
want, but it is a freedom that you
know how to use. Teenagers here
are very mature, even more so
than a 21-year-old in my country.
This summer Miss Ojara will
take part in a two-week seminar
on Community Development at
the School of Social Work. "It will
be attended by 20 students repre-
senting 11 different countries," she
said. "It is very interesting to meet
and talk with people from so many
different places. One of the most
interesting aspects of living in a
university town like Ann Arbor is
meeting people."

I29'

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