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July 12, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESD.

TH IHIA ALYTES

tet Concert Among Scheduled Events

niey Quartet - :.
ae Stanley Quartet will per-
'the second of its three sum-
concerts at 8:30 p.m. today
ackham Lecture Hall.
ie faculty concert, sponsored
he School of Music, will fea-
the Beethoven "Quartet in G
>r, Op. 18, No. 2," "Quartet
7" by University composer-in-
ence Ross Lee Finney and
artet in G Minor, Op. 10" by

Ward will hold an informal dis-
cussion program at 11 a.m. in the
Frieze Building.
Both meetings are open to the
public.
Prof. Ward has served for 25
years as the director of the Chil-
dren's Theater of Evanston, Ill.,
an organization which she found-
ed.
She is assistant professor emer-
itus at the School of Speech,
Northwestern University.

e concert will be open to
c without charge.

the I Education Conference

Speech Assembly . .
Prof. Winifred Ward, national-
y recognized authority on chil-
.ren's theater, will speak on "Cre-
tive Dramatics: An Art =or a Way
f Teaching?" at 3 p.m. today in
lacknam Amphitheater.
Presented under the auspices of
he speech department, Prof.

The 29th Annual Summer Edu-
cation Conference, co-sponsored
by the School of Education and
the Summer Session, convenes at
9 a.m. today at the Architecture
Auditorium.
Ellsworth S. Obourn, of the
United States Department of
Health, Education and.. Welfare,
will begin the session with a lec-
ture dealing with "The Challenge
to Science Education."
"The Strange. Case of the Cos-
mic Rays," a film preview,hwill be
seen at 1 p.m. in Schorling Audi-
torium.

School. "Harnessing Curiosity:
How Efficient Is Our Elementary
Science Power Plant?" will be
conducted by Prof. Lawrence A.
Conrey, of the education school.
"What 'Shall We Teach About
Radioactivity?" is the topic to be
discussed by Prof. Roger L. Leath-
erman, assistant director of the
Michigan Memorial Phoenix Pro-
ject.
Prof. Conrey will also discuss
"Keeping Curiosity Alive - Sec-
ondary School Science."
Linguistics Forum . .
"Comparative and Applied Lin-
guistics" in the Senufo Language
Group" is the topic to be dis-
cussed by Prof. William E. Wel-
mers, Hartford Seminary Foun-
dation, at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheater.
Prof. Wlmers will be present-
ed under the auspices of the Lin-
guistics Institute.
U' Square Dance . ..
A "University Community
Square Dance," will be held from
8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday at
Palmer Field, according to Mrs.
Elizabeth Allen, of the men's
physical education department.
This is the first in a series of
square dances sponsored by the
men's and women's physical edu-
cation departments and the Sum-
mer Session; one other had to be
cancelled because of rain.
Asia Documentary . .
A documentary film on Asia
will be shown at 3 p.m. today in
tVe Audio-Visual Room of the
ndergraduate Library.
It is sponsored by the Workshop
in Asian Studies and the Summer
Session.

Stage'n
Screen
THEATRE
Lydia Mendelssohn-"The Pot-
ting Shed" by Graham Greene,
presented by the speech depart-
ment, 8 p.m. tomorrow through
Friday.
Northland Playhouse, Detroit--
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" with
Diana Barrymore, 8:30 p.m. today
through Sunday.
Music Circle Playhouse, Detroit
-"Guys and Dolls" with Maxie
Rosenbloom, 8:30 p.m. today
through Sunday.
MOTION PICTURES
The State-"The Vikings" with
Kirk Douglas, today and tomorrow
(may be held over); "The Key"
with William Holden and Sophia
Loren, next attraction.
The Michigan -- "Revenge of
Frankenstein" and "Curse of the
Demon," ends today; "Rock a Bye
Baby" begins tomorrow.
The Campus - "Silken Affair"
with David Niven, ends today;
"Colditz Story" with Eric Portman,
tomorrow through Saturday.
MUSIC
Rackham Lecture Hall-Concert
by the Stanley Quartet, 8:30 p.m.
today.
The Diagonal--Outdoor concert
by the Lockport Township High
School Band, Ernest Caneva, con-
ductor, 7 p.m. tomorrow,
Rackham Lecture Hall-Concert
by the Woodwind Quintet, 8:30
p.m. tomorrow.
The Diagonal-Outdoor concert
by the combined Summer Session
and Lockport Township High
School Bands, Prof. William D.
Revelli, conductor, 7:15 p.m.
Thursday.

BOARDING HOUSE HASSLE:
Stafford Delineates Cyprus Predicament

Special interest groups will
meet at 2 p.m. at the University

HALLE R'S

JEWELERS

717 NORTH UNIyERSITY AVENUE
WEST OF HILL AUDITORIUM
On North U. facing Campus

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The Cyprus crisis reminds you
a little of a boarding house hassle.
Three of the boarders in the
house of NATO have stuck their
forks into the same choice morsel.
And if two don't let go, the squab-
ble might turn into a fight that
could knock the house off its
foundations.
The house already is swaying to
the bitterness of the argument.
Turkey might let go if it were
guaranteed a bit of the morsel.
But Greece won't let go.
And Britain can't.
Sitting uninvited at the table
is communism, egging on the fight
in hopes of at least robbing the
tidbit of its strategic flavor.
Not Inviting
Cyprus isn't a particularly in-
viting looking morsel. Its produc-
tivity certainly is nothing to brag
about. But a glance at a map
shows quickly from where it draws
its flavor.
A rock-bound fortress, it sits
almost astride the shipping lanes
of the oil-rich Middle East. Its
ports of Famagusta, Larnaca and
Akrotiri are out a few hours sail-
ing time from the Suez Canal.
Its air fields at Akrotiri and
Nicosia are only 575 miles from
Athens, 350 miles from Ankara,
600 miles from the oil fields of
Iraq, 370 miles from Cairo, and
1,500 miles from Moscow.
Suggest Cooling Off
The British have proposed that
the other two antagonists agree
to a cooling off period of seven
years during which all three would
watch over Cyprus while working
out a settlement. But Greece and
Turkey have rejected the idea.
And the fight goes on.
"Enosis"-union with Greece-
is the war cry of Greece and Greek
Cypriots. Greek descendants form
an 80 per cent majority of the
island's more than a half million
people. The other 20 per cent are
Turkish with a smattering of
British and other nationalities.
For almost three decades, Greek
Cypriots have been urging Enosis.
The campaign was stepped up in
1946. Since 1950, Archbishop Ma-
karios, a handsome, bearded fire-
brand, has been principal spokes-
man for union with Greece. Al-
though he has deplored violence,
EOKA - the youth organization
blamed for the terrorist campaign
-claims the archbishop is the sole
representative of Greek Cypriots
seeking independence from Bri-
tain.
The Greeks are quick to note
that many British leaders through
the years, including Sir Winston
VDIAL
NO 2-3136
NOW SHOWING
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Churchill, have endorsed union of I with British dominion over the

I

SEMi-ANNUAL SALE

of

CLOTHING andFI
These selected groups of clothing and furnishings are from our regular stock of the
finest of imported and domestic merchandise. Reductions range from 20% to 60%.

F

-CLOTHING-

SUITS.

Formerly
$95.00
$85.00
$75.00
$65.00
$60.00
$54.00

NOW
$71.50
$63.75
$56.00
$52.00
$48.00
$40.85

SPECIAL
Cotton
Wash Pants
and Khakis
were 4.95 to 8.95
now from $2.95

Formerly
$60.00
$55.00
$45.00
$35.00
$32.50
$22.50

SPORT COATS

NOW
$45.00
$41.50
$33.75
$26.25
$24.35
$16.85

Cyprus with Greece. Yet Greece
once had a chance to take over
the island and turned it down.
Britain offered Cyprus to the
Greeks in 1914 if they would help
Serbia in World War I, but they
refused.
The British have administered'
Cyprus since 1878 when they
agreed with the then-owner, Tur-
key, to help defend the eastern
Turkish provinces against Russia.
When Turkey became an enemy'
during World War I, Britain an-
nexed the island. This annexation
was recognized by Turkey in the
1923 Treaty of Lausanne.
Always an important' military
base for the British, it became
even more important when they
lost Egypt. Cyprus is now head-
quarters of the British forces in
the Middle East. Britain has built
an important new base at Epis-
kopi. .
Last British Foothold
If the British lose Cyprus, they
lose their last foothold in the
Middle East between Malta and
Aden. Even more important, the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion loses an important military
base in its ring around Russia.
Until the Greek Cypriots be-
came vehement in their demands
for Enosis, Turkey was content
DIAL No 2-2513
ENDS T4-N ITE
"REVENGE
OF FRANKENSTEIN"
Plus
"CURSE OF DEMON"
STARTS WEDNESDAY
| ERYME3S

island only 60 miles off its south-
ern shore.
But when Greek terrorism began
interfering with the 95,000 Turkish
Cypriots, Turkey demanded parti-
tion. Britain, however, has reject-
ed a division of the island between
Greece and Turkey as impractical
because the two communities are
largely integrated.
Although little is heard from
the Communists-except for an,
occasional labor strike-their cry
is the same as the followers of the
archbishop: Enosis.
The party, banned by the Britsh,

USNSA Head Regrets Plans
To Cut Federal Scholarships

:dn

r-

ALL WASH and WEAR SUITS
Reduced 25 %

is centered in the trade unions.
Called AKEL, it is led by Ezekys
Papaioannou who returned to the
island last Jan. 5 after an absence
of six months.
Several months ago in an inter-
view, Papaioannou cracked the
party door just wide enough for a
glimpse of its aims for Cyprus.
He was asked: Since Greece is
allied with NATO, even if the
British left isn't it likely Greece
would maintain the military in-
stallations on Cyprus?
That then is the communist
goal -spiking the Cyprus-based
guns of NATO.

,

.4

A

TOPCOATS, OVERCOATS, TROUSERS
Reduced 25%

STARTS THURSDAY

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The follow-
ing is the text of a recent letter
from United States National Stu-
dent Association President Ray
Farabee to President Dwight D.
Eisenhower.)
We noted with sincere regret
the New York Times' report of
your letter to Rep. Stuyvesant
Wainwright, (R-N.Y.), in which
you suggested a reduction in the
number of proposed Federal
scholarships.,
Since it is generally acknowl-
edged that 100,000 able students
are denied college education each
year because of financial need, the
present bill for 18,000 to 23,000
stipends is helpful, but inade-
quate.
Further cuts in the number of
available scholarships, therefore,
might reduce the student aid pro-
gram below the level of effective
action.
As the representative organiza-
tion of students in 355 colleges
t

..with this
key
I thee
wed..

; -

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Includes HOSIERY - NECKWEAR - BELTS
I 50 to 60% OFF GROUP JACKETS - SPORTSH I RTS

-FURNISHINGS-

K-

IMPORTED HANDMADE
N ECKWEAR

SPORTSHIRTS
Reduced 33,1/3%

A CARL FOREMAN Picture
WILLIAM SOPHIA
HOLDER LOWE
TREVOR
HO0WARD
** U
OSCAR HOMOLKA

i

MARILYN MAXWELL
^PARAMOUNT $ ICTURE

Formerly
$6.50
$5.00
$4.50,
$3.50
$2.50

NOW
$2.35
$2.35
$2.35
$1.95
$1.65

Formerly
$13.50
$10.50
$ 8.95
$ 7.50
$ 6.50
$ 5.95

NOW
$8.95
$6.80
$5.95
$4.95
$4.35
$3.95

A IGHROAO PESENTATICa

I

EVERETT'S DRIVE-IN
"The Home of the Famous California Delux Burger"
10c French Fries 15c Milk Shakes

DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDS TO-NITE
"THE SILKEN AFFAIR"
STARTS WEDNESDAY
(OLDITZ 5STORY
F'ERIC PORTMAN-F
Sensation of
"~Separate Tables.
JOHN MILLS
SRieTsedby DCA

and universities, the majority of
accredited four-year institutions
in the United States, USNSA prea
viously endorsed your original
proposal of a $1,000,000,000 pro-
gram.
The proposal, however, was
termed by the students "by no
means adequate."
We strongly agree with your
statement that "There is a com-
pelling need for federal action
now to help meet emergency needs
in American education."
The $220,000,000 student loan
program should, as you stated,
reduce the need for scholarships,
but the demand for aid seems too
great to be totally eradicated by
adjustments through loan pro-
grams.
It is also regrettable that the
proposed bill stresses increasing
the number of students taking
science, mathematics, and foreign
languages. Federal aid, we believe,
should foster, not hamstring, gen-
eral education.
We hope that the feelings of
students, who are so vitally con-
cerned with the resolution of edu-
cational problems, will continue
to be a factor in your considera-
tion of issues affecting higher
education.
Police Break
Teen-Age Ring
Police have broken up a teen-
age burglar ring which has ac-
counted for almost 100 break-ins
in Washtenaw and Wayne Coon-
ties, sheriff's detectives an-
nounced Saturday.
seven persons have been arrest-
ed from the gang which reported-
ly has garnered approximately
$3,000.
Many of the crimes were com-
mitted by only two or three of
the group, but on some occasions
the entire list of youths partici-
pated, officers said.
He said the youths apparently
spent all they took, as none had
money on them when arrested.

DRESS SHIRTS
Reduced 33'/3%

Pizza Served In Car

Electronic Curb Service

Formerly
$10.50
$ 7.50
$ 6.50
$ 5.95
$ 5.50

NOw
$8.40
$4.95
$4.35
$3.95
$3.70

Ladies' Tailored Shirts

2280 WEST STADIUM BLVD.
Near Wrigley's NO 5-5864

I

33'/% off
sizes 8to 16

F -
W- EVERY DAY AND EVENING -GENUINE OLD TOWN CANOESr
W- f
"I Ai!EFor Renf

11

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n

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