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July 11, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-11

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ieiepnonei appmg
VereomeWhispering

iL4oi

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wf

A

Press Survey Claims

.SHINGTON P)-Whispering
et you nowhere.
your phone is tapped, or your
adequately bug'ged, your in-
ost secrets-if you're inclined
ill them-may be overheard
ecorded.
st of us look with distaste on
professional eavesdropper. Yet1
s his mechanical ear to thel
id, or to the wire, a lot of the
'even though it's rare that
lushed as dramatically as hej
a the Goldfine case.
.oever would have guessed
an investigator for the House
lative Oversight subcommit-
could have been caught with
ectronic device cosying right
the' hotel room door?
Goldfine Hlorrified
'nard Goldfine, the Boston
e man under investigation,
ally expressed horror at the
very. His lawyers said they
horrified, though not so
derstruck that they didn't
ptly make the most of the4
very of a microphone right
to ther room.
they certainly would have
naive had they expressed too4
isurprise. After all, they had
a gumshoe of their own to
out such practices.
di certainly anyone who hasF
around at all knows that, like
not, wiretapping and eaves-
>ing are fairly big business.
re than two pages of the
inter Plans,
ident Party
reception will be held for all
international students and
friends at 8 p.m. tomorrow
e Rackham Assembly Hall.
ere will be refreshments and
ng, according to Barbara
k of the International Center.

classified section of the Washimg-
ton phone book are used for the
detectives to list their numbers
and their accomplishments.
Reluctant To Talk
Understandably though, such
firms are very reluctant to talk
about their work.
Newspapermen, congressmen,
yes, and congressional witnesses
have complained periodically that
their phones were tapped.
Now, for an important distinc-
tion between wiretapping and
eavesdropping.
Many legal authorities think
wiretapping is not illegal so long
as the dirt collected is not di-
vulged. Another school holds thatj
this is nonsense, that by its very
nature it is going to be divulged ,
to somebody.
But everyone seems agreed that
eavesdropping, or bugging, whileI
messy, is not illegal.
So for the benefit of those not
aware of the latest in bugging,
let's visit a man who is alert to
this strange profession, but who
must remain anonymous.
"Bugging" Hard
He says bugg-ing is more corn-
plaicted than it looks, that its suc-
cess depends on understanding
the acoustics in the room. Fur-
thermore, amicrophone can be
too sensitive. "It'll pick up every-
thing except what you want to
hear," he said.
A good method, he said, is to
bore a hole in the wall until the
wallpaper is reached, and place
the microphone over the hole.
Better still, get inside the room
in advance and bug the place
thoroughly.
"Some like the microphone
drawn down around the base-t
board," he said. "Some hide them
in lamp bases. Around the phone
is ,good, anywhere where conver-
sations are held.
"Around the bed is okay, too.
Wonderful for divorce cases."

, s
s':
'.,
c
:.h '..
.. J...

: .;

Hy WALTER BREEDE JR.
A ciatFed'ress Staff writer
Clarence A. Jackson, president
of the Aierican United Life In-
suranczie Co. of India~lnlpolis, leanedi
back in lhis chair and thoughtfully
proclaimed:
"Things aren't getting bad as
fast as they were,"
Jackson's comment, in response
to a nationwide survey by The
Associated Press, comes pretty
close to reflecting the general
view about the United States
economy at the halfway mark of
recession 1958,

niterd Slits and tou'll fnd most
U r teer slivin d better than at an
time since World War IL Some
hard pressed for help, are offering
jobs to unemployed city workers,

-Daily-Ai Erbe
wer sister, the Undergraduate Library, in its recently, transformed
s and faculty members of the University must now take place at the
. Both of these changes were a direct result of the heavy budget cuts

More Tractors Sold
Lloyd Belmer of Fort Do
Iowa, sells farm machinery.
sold more tractors in the first :
months this year than in all
1957, In the lush ,Rio Grande V
ley of southern Texas, Basc
Spillar, executive vice presideni
McAllen, Tex., First National Be
asserts: "The outlook economic,,
for the valley is the best in yea
Even in the boomingest !a
centersthough, the recession ca
faint shadows.

dgc

LIBRARY CUIANGES- The General Library now resembles its ne
system of open stacks (left). The checking out of books by student
exit control centers at the entrance to the General Library right)
suffered by the University Library System.

Lrary System Changes Result from Budg-et Cuts

By JUDITH DONER
The recent visible mutations In
the processes of ihe University
General Library are only the first
in a line of changes to be made in
the library system,' according to a
recent statement by Libbary Di-
ector Frederick H. Wagman.
The changes are a direct result
cf the $50,000 budget cut incurred
by the library system, according
tii Wagml'an.
The budget itself calls for the
OE-b
on I I

r11ese o 11 members of the Ii-
biary staff. Four of these will be
released from academic positions,
Wagma indicted that, in ad-
dition. t e number ''f hours that
employc c students xmil work, will
have to be lessened. Hi said that
tis is _ ferable to reducing the
student staff numiber'wise.
A red actior in the reope of the
lhbrary extension service to people
in the state xviii also be made. "We
Iwill .undoubtedly close one of the
branch libraries to help meet
costs," Wagman said.
"When this will occur will de-
pend upon when the general li-
brary will be able to Integrate the
branch into its set-up," he con-
tinued.

Wagman said there are no plans
to have the branch libraries re-
ert to the open stack system, ini-
tiated at the University in the
Undergraduate Library and re-
cently duplicated in the General
Library.

cent of the book collection has
been lost already," he reported.
"With the book budget we have
received, we can't hope to do
much more than replace the
stolen books."
If, however, the thefts continue

He insisted that he open stack at the spring rate, then the system
system in which there no books in both libraries will have to be
on reserve is still in the "experi- revamped, Wagman said.,

mental stage, due to the high
theft rate recorded at the Unlder-'
graduate Library during its first
six months in existence.
He said that the theit rate is
not abnormally high for a Uni-
versity, but that there is no rea-
son why it should be as high as
it is,
"Indications are that two per

"Entry to stacks is an educa-
tional .e x p e r I e n c e," Wagman
mavintained. It would be too bad
for everyone concerned, if closed
stacks had to be reinstated.
K antOr Art
At Museu

OPEN EVENINGS
CoIu hiOaRecor s
(Harmony Series)

each

E An exhibit "Sacred Writings and
Their Tkansmission" is being pre-
sented in the General Library'
lobby.
It reflects theeime of the sum
mer session, ''Religion in Contem
porary Society."
On display are rare and earl,
Bibles of all languages and Hebrew
writings.
There are also bibIc ipapri an
facimIles of the Lindiasfarne Gospe
and the'Book of Kells, as well a
biblical mamiscripts and books on
the Moslem and Far Eastern re-
lipgions.
The exhibit can be seen unti
Aug. 1.
D!A l0O: -251 3
NOW SHOWING
THE "TOP" COMEDY
OF ALL TIMES'
"NO TTIME FOR
SERGEANTS"
STARTS SUNDAY
2 "CHILLERS"
pp:5,
14 THE I -,
ice P 3 " r a
4 )k
r

-d
Y

CLEVELAND UIT Perhaps the
high schools which give letters to
1 athletes and trophies to debaters
s should also give awards for cx-
h at ea was ue rce
t the 10 to 15 per cent of the na-
tion's students who are academi-
cally talented,
The report, iwe years in the
writing, was released during the
annual convention of the National
Education Association. It said the
schools have a responsibility ,to
put academic excellence in a bet-
ter light, not only among the stu- '
dents but among teachers, parents
and the community at large as
well.,
Says No Real Danger
There is no real danger, it said.,
that singling out gifted students
for secial anon wil lea to
the creation of an "intellectual
elite" in this country.:
The American society now tol-
erates a number of such elites,
the report noted, There is an elite

Suggested by

.3

PRE SENTEtD Di RING CONVENTION:-

,i

I

An exhibition "Paintings and
& Drawings by Morris Kantor," is
pres.ently o d'splay at the Un-..
ier'ity Museum o Art. b
Recent Report Tihe cxhibition, whiich will con-
______________________ tinue through the' Summer Ses-
sioc includes 12 oil paintinigs and
"Further more," it said, "the a, number of drawings, selected by
very variety of elites protects the the artist and lent by him,.
American-society against he dom- Representing different periods
inance of any smnle one."
And lat is this special attei_ ip e on arer e
tion going to do to bright itte rwigshve beenarngdi
Johnny and Susie? Will it make gpproxieci'onoiogical Se-
them little stinkers, who feel su- uence from left to right to show
perior to those less gifted? the different phases of the ar-?
Passow Says No tist's work over a period of 30
Not necessarily, said Hari'y Pas- years.
sow, one of the authors of the Born in Mir sk. Russia in 1896,

Hundreds Interviewed
To.find the mood of the nation,
Associated Press reporters talked
to hundreds of people-bankers,
bartenders, bus drivers, mer-
chanth is, stenographers, manufac-
turershuwvs, farmers, eon-
omists and factory workers-froma
Michigan to Texas and California
to Maine,
The reporters found:1
Farmers sitting on top of the
world.
Many consumers scared by re-
cession talk, unwilling to splurge,
and more selective in their buying
Bankers and merchants cau-
tiously optimistic, but not hopeful
of any real upturn until- the end
of the year.
Auto Dealers Down
Auto dealers down in the dumps,
Broadly speaking, how good ora
how bad business is depends on
where you are.
Western ranchers, waxing pros-.
perous on the cattle boom, refer
td the recession as "that thing
back East," ,
But you can't jdlst pick out one,
large region and say business here
is better or worse than somewhere
else.
In some Western states devoted]
to both farming and mining, you'll
find boom prosperity and recession
side by side. .
Get away from the mines and
factories almost anywhere in the
Students'Study
In Newspaper
Jfob Trainin
Twenty-six journalism students;
from the University are engaged,
in a program which combinesa
study with on-the-job experience,
In a fellowship program involv-
ing 11 Michigan newspapers, foura
out of state newspapers and one
advertising agency, the students
are assigned on a rotating basis so
that they work in various depart-
ments of the cooperating news-,
paper or advertising agency,
i The program is undertaken on
three levels-two or three years
post-Master's degree, one year
post-Bachelor of Arts degree and
two 'or three months summer fel-
lowships.
"The uniqueness of the program
lies in its year-long methodical co-
operative supervision by manage-
ment and the University," Prof.
Wesley H. Maurer, chairman of
the Journalism department and
supervisor of the fellowship pro-
gram said.
Concerning the monthlyr eports
which the journalists, are required
to make to the University, Prof.
Maurer explained, "They bring to-
gether a variety of training meth-
od's and provide the Journalism
department with a test of the ef-
fectiveness of its teaching meth-
ods,"
"This bekomes a source for plan-
ning in modification or strength-
ening of current curricula offer-
ings," he said.
"The post-bachelor of arts pro-
gram was strengthened this year
by increasing it from seven to
12 months, Prof. Maurer contin-
ued, "This came as a result of
experiences of both publishers and
faculty members," he added.

128-page report,.
"You will find little stinkers in
any group, whether they're bright
or dumb," Prof. Passow said,
"Where you find such poor atti-
tudies, the teachers and parents
are likely to be at fault, not the
system which recognizes their
superiorcapabilities,"
Prof. Passow, director of a tab-
ented youth project at Teachers
College, Columbia University, told
a news conference there is a great
ned for special progress for gifted
cildrenCi,

'HE MARCHES OF JOHN PHILIP SOUSA
4EW SOUNDS BY PETE RUGOLO
'EGGY LEE SINGS WITH BENNY GOODMAN
kN AWARD CONCERT BY ART TATUM
)INAH SHORE SINGS - COLE PORTER &
RICHARD RODGERS
'URE DELIGHT WITH DANNY KAYEl
VOODY HERMAN PLAYS HIS OLD HITS
ALPH SUTTON PLAYS FATS WALLER
HE HITS OF GLEN GRAY BY THE CASA LOMA ORCH.
METRONOME ALL-STARS
)IXIELAND ALL-STARS
'HE CLASSICS OF BING CROSBY
VOODY HERMAN'S FIRST HERD
)LE! FLAMENCO recorded in Spain,
N OLD VIENNA
:IRCUS MUSIC
ONGS OF HAWAII
rOUJOURS PARIS
HA-CHA-CHA recorded in Mexico
MAMBO WITH, MORALES
OUTH AFRICAN FOLK SONGS
ONGS OF OLD MEXICO
AUSIC FROM SOUTH PACIFIC-
CHEHERAZADE with Rodzinski and Cleveland Orch.
!CHAIKOVSKY'S SIXTH SYMPHONY with Rodzinski
and The Clevpland Orch.
EETHOVEN'S THIRD SYMPHONY with Leinsdorf and
The Rochester Orch.
CHUBERT'S UNFINISHED SYMPHONY and MOZART'S
SYMPHONY NO. 40, Leinsdorf and
The Rochester Orch,
'CHAIKOVSKY'S ROMEO AND JULIET and 1812
OVERTURE with Rodzinski and The Cleveland Orch.
'CHAIKOVSKY'S NUTCRACKER SUITE and GRIEG'S
PEER GYNT SUITE with Leinsdorf and
The Rochester Orch.
EBUSSY'S LA MER and ENESCO'S ROUMANIAN
RHAPSODY, Rodzinski and Cleveland Orch.
ACHMANINOFF'S SECOND PIANO CONCERTO
with Gyorgy Sandor
TRAUSS WALTZES with Schoenherr and the
Vienna State Opera Orch.
FFENBACH'S GAITE PARISIENNE and CHOPIN'S LES
SYLPHIDES with Kurtz and the Columbia Symphony
Orchestra
ACH'S BRANDENBURG CONCERTI in three volumes
with Fritz Reiner
MOZART'S SYMPHONIES No. 35 and 40, Leinsdorf
and Rochester Orch.
AOUSSORGSKY'S PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION
with Rodzinski and the New York Philharmonic
ERLIOZ REQUIEM--Rochester Oratorio Society
EETHOVEN'S SYMPHONIES No. 5, No. 1, No. 2, No. 4,
with Weingartner and the London Philharmonic
(two records)
'VALDI'S GLORIA
A1 - VM

I

Kantor received his training in
this country, living and working
in New York City.
His work is iicluded in many
of the major art collections of
the country, including the Metro-
politan Museum of Art, the Mu-
seum of Modern Art, the Whit-I
ney "usem, the Detroit Institute
of Arts and the Worchester Art
MuTseum.
His painting, "Figures in Land-
scape, 1954," is in the collection at
the University's Museum.,
Kantor teaches in the Cooper
Art School and the Art Students
League of New York,
House Namned
As Chairman

Farm states seeking to attract
new indu ties -fd prospects
harder to locate and, tougeto
sell. Industrial development agen
cies reprt that manufacturers
who had considered building mw
plants in new lcai tiniae
shelved their plans for now,
Farm Business Good
, Merchants in thrivg. harm
communities say business is good,
but it should be better. They say
their customers have been fright-
ened by recession trends in othr
parts of the country.
And farmers know full ell that
their prosperity rises or falls h
the vagaries of the market place
and the weather. The great post-
war drought still lives on in ti
memries of Southwest cattle
farmers, and lately new havoc has
been wrought by grasshopper wr*
nadoes and floods,
On and off the farm, American
,consumers today are cautious. If
they're among. the 64 million
Americans holding jobs, they prob-
ably know somebody or theyW
heard about somebody who's be
laid off. This knowledge has cre-
ated a fear psychology that's hurt.
ing retail sales, eyen in areas wher
jobs are plentiful and income.
high.
Consumer Selective
What's more, the typical United
States consumer of mid-1958 has
acquired a, new yardstick of l-
ues. He's more selective in what h,
buys.
Orrin Hankins makes good
money as aroofer. 1e ow a nea d
suburban ranch house in North
Sacramento, comfortably supports
a wife and three kids. The other
day he arrived home in a newly
purchased Chrysler, vintage 1956.
Why a used car? "Because," sai
Hankins, "the new ones cost too
much."
At about the same time he
bought the car, Hankins invested
in two brand new bicycles a sall
boat and a 35-horsepower out.
board, No drop in consumer spend.
ing here. But multiply Hanki s
case, a hundred thousand times
and you'll realize what worries
the auto dealers.
Psychologists who study the hi.
den urges that make people buy
say the high-powered, chrome-be
decked American car has lost Its
value as a prestige symbol.
Businessmen all over tii coun-
try say consumers have plenty of
cash to spend but they're puttin
it in the bank.,
Study Ceterl
May Locate
In Ann Arbor
A half million dollar research
center proposed by the American
Society of Heating and Air Con-
ditioning Engineers (ASHACE)
may be located in Ann Arbor.
Joseph Detweiler, Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce boar4
president, tolr the Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce in a board
meeting that the society is "very
interested In locating in Ann w
bor and the University is interest-
ed in them because. of the re-
search facilities.
~They are very definitely Som
to move somewhere,". Detweiler
explained to the board. "They will
contribute to the economy of Ann
Arbor"
If the society moved here, it
would request tax exemption from
city, county and state taxes, Det-
Weiler added,

Thy semsyaZiWbp
CO MAPyTU4 4e~t
CO-FEATUR

group of scentiss, an elie group
of athletes .and an elite group of
mscans, among others,
IAL
NO 2-3N36G
OTHING
EER
ITS
yEN EANCE.*
IDYIS
E i BORON[N
?AEUIGI r'

Expect Increase
RI Central Size
MOUNT PLEASANT, P) - Aus-
tin J. Buchanan, director of ad-
missions at Central Michigan Col-
ege, says enrollment is expected
to reach 4,400 this year, an in-
creas of 32 per cent over last year.
DIAL NO 8-6416

Dr. Frederic B. House was ap-
pointed by the Ann Arbor Cham-
ber of Commerce board as chair--
man of the Chamber's education
committee yesterday.
Dr. House recently retired as
president of the Ann Arbor Board
of Education.
He had served as school board
president for the past two years.
111-1
F. a _ t

NOW SHOWING
A CASCADE OF CHUCKLES!"
"BROTH ERS-iN-LAW"
STARTS SUNDAY
S K N OWVVS ;
ON
TREES!

i
.'

I

EVERETT'S DRIVE-IN
"The Home of the Famous California Delux Burger"
lOc French Fries * 15c Milk Shakes

0ANA ANDREWS
C USEAPcTR

/
GENEY~WIrE PA&E'RLDS"UIRE
EAIST RIhl' WI!LI HDEWHIJL

Pizza Served In Car

2280 WEST STADIUM BLVD. I
Near Wrigley's NO 5-5864

Electronic Curb Service

'~4 ~ '~J

NEXT ATTRACTION
"T HE KEY"

[

EVERY DAY AND EVENING - GENUINE OLD TOWN CANOESr
FrRe
0, r.

Ze zvery finesi of the imported
stoinless steel patterns -
Dunsk, Jensen, Gense.

44"
DRIVE A NEW CAR TONIGHT
BARGAIN EVENING RAT
Keep social engagements in a
gleaming new Ford or other
fine carl From 6 P.M. until
9 A.M. next day, only
C $4,00
plues Meageat 8c per mils
This ipouI veal tag rat. also jInE.do

I

11

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