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July 03, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 7111CHIGAN DAILY ___________

ackham Research Grants Announced

-Photo Courtesy University News Service
All CHOO! !-These people are working to end the sneezing which affects 7,500,000 American hay
fever sufferers annually. The poor soul in the center sits downwind, handkerchief in hand, waiting
to feel the effects of pollen from the ragweed plot in the foreground. The other two men are investi-
gating the problem.
'U' Ragweed May Lessen Sneezing

Hay fever sufferers no doubt will
be pleased to hear that a plot of
ragweed 100-ft. square has ma-
tured early this year.
That is, they will be pleased to
hear the reason for the early
flowering of the plant which causes
sneezing and suffering for more
than 7,500,000 Americans who get
hay fever and asthma every year
The ragweed crop is the result of
an investigation being conducted
at Willow Run by University
botanists, physicians and meteor-
ologists into what affects the emis-
sion of pollen by the plant and how
pollen affects hay fever symptoms.
Prof. Warren H. Wagner, Jr., of
the botany department heads a
group of botanists who are study-
ing the way the sun affects the
emission of pollen. The botanists
are also responsible for the early
blooming of the plot of ragweed.
Prof. Wagner and his colleagues
are interested in seeing whether
Walcott Says
Progressive
Education Fine
Progressive education isn't re-
sponsible for the condition of high
school students today, Prof. Fred
G. Walcott of the education school
said recently.
The lethargic - often hoodlum-
like - attitude of high school stu-
dents is often due to authoritarian
attitude of traditional educators,
Prof. Walcott says.
His reason: traditionalists are
not concerned with the interests
or self-selection of pupils, but
with methods of compelling stu-
dents to* learn pre-determined
subjects. This leads to offering
knowledge on a "take-it-or-leave-
it" basis.
When something goes wrong,
Prof. Walcott says, the tradition-
alists blame it on "soft educa-
tion," without evaluating their
own theories to see if they are
wrong.
DIAL NO 2-31,36
"MAGNIFICENT! a composite of
mystery, murder, crime and pun-
shmentE . TAUT, PACKED
WITH EMOTION!"
- Jesse Zunser, Cue

the sun's radiation or its drying
effect causes the emission of pol-
len.
Physicians are using human
guinea pigs-brave hay fever suf-
ferers-who sit downwind of the
ragweed plot to determine when
hay fever symptoms occur and to
what extent.
Dr. John M. Sheldon, professor
Scans Verse
ByMachine,-
"Computers can be used to study,
the impact of poetic verse on an
entire culture," declared Prof.
Thomas A. Sebeok of Indiana Uni-
versity,
Prof. Sebeok, a visiting professor
in the Linguistic Institute and the
anthropology department, gave a
lecture on the use of the computers
recently.
Basis for Prof. Sebeok's research
are 4,000 verse texts in Cheremis,
a language spoken by 500,000 resi-
dents of east-central European
Russia. The analysis of one of
these verse texts by hand took Se-
beok an entire month.
At that rate, he estimated that
a mere 10 per cent survey of all the
texts would take 25 years. He
found that the machines would be
able to complete an analysis in
four of the five years.
The process is basically to feed
the machine a set of questions to
determine how many times a
single word appears in the verses.
The results allow inferences con-
cerning symbols in the language of
a particular culture,
"This machine method of in-
vestigation can, in principle, be
applied to any language," Prof.
Sebeok noted.
The DI

of internal medicine at the medical
school directs the medical phase of
the research.
Inmates at the State Prison of
Southern Michigan also helped
out. Physicians studied them six
times a day throughout an earlier
hay fever season to study the ef-
fects of the amount of pollen on
symptoms of hay fever.
One hundred tiny, sticky flags
on poles, located downwind of the
ragweed plot, aid the meteorolo-
gists, who are attempting to deter-
mine the number of pollen grains
transported by the wind.
Laboratory microscopes are used
to count the pollen which collects
on the lead edge of the flags
located at various heights and dis-
tances from the plot.
Other factors which meteorolo-
gists study with an assortment of
equipment are wind speed, direc-
tion and turbulence, humidity, and
temperature. Prof. E. Wendell
Hewson of the engineering college
heads this phase of the research.
Gardens Open
In Summer
A rose is a rose is a rose is a
rose.
And at the University Botanical
Gardens a rose is likely to be an
evening primrose. Several thous-
and have been grown for research
in plant genetics.
These, and almost 40 acres of
other flowers and plants can be
seen from 8 a.m. to sundown daily
at the Gardens.
Greenhouse hours are from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. The Gardens are located
at 1404 Iroquois Drive near the
intersection of Packard and
Stadium.

AL RIO

. .. for the BEST pizza in TOWN
also
SPAGHETTI RAVIOLI STEAKS * CHOPS * CHICKEN
CALL us to order REAL CORNISH PASTIES for picnics.
Also served Monday and Wednesday between 4 P.M. and 8 P.M.
CLOSED 4th, 5th and 6th
122 W._WASHINGTON ST. Phone NO 2-9575

TODAY

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DIAL
NO 2-2513

"FUNNIEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR"
--LIFE MAGAZINE

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