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June 25, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AY. .TJNE 25. 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA I

SUMMER PRODUCTIONS:
'Charley's Aunt' To Open.

The Department of Speech has
'selected five plays with a wide va-
4rety of settings and themes for
the summer session.
The series will commence with a
loud chuckle -- presenting the
venerable farce, "Charley's Aunt",
in which Ray Bolger originally
starred:
Starting July 2, this play, as
well as the other four, will run
for four days. All performances be-
gin at 8 p.m, in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
"The School for Wives," the
second production, is the first play
Moliere wrote after he was mar-
ried. It contains much sympathy
for young love and natural gaiety
and has been called one of Mo-

liere's most zestful and unreflec-
tive plays. Opening night will be
July 9.
Suspense Play
A chan'ge of pace for both audi-
ence and players will be provided
when the department presents Jo-
seph Hayes' suspense drama, "The
Desperate Hours," starting July 23.
This thriller was a smash-hit
on Broadway during the 1954-55
season, and won the Antoinette
Perry Award as the best play of
the year. Prof. Jack E. Bender will
direct both this one and "Char-
ley's Aunt."
The setting switches to 13th
century China for "The Circle of
Chalk," a play abounding with

Pla Series
comedy, intrigue, satire and sus-
pense as the magic circle of chalk
enables the judge to determine
who a child's true parents are.
Prof. William P. Halstead, who
returns to the department after a
year's Sabbatical leave spent in
England and Europe, will direct
this production, as well as "The
School for Wives."
Opera Production
For the, final four performances
of the season, the speech depart-
ment and the School of Musiv will
combine to present Bedrihh Sme-
tana's comic opera, "The Bar-
tered Bride." This will be the 23rd'
consecutive summer that an opera
will have been given.
Prof. Hugh Z. Norton and Prof.
Josef Blatt will be co-directors of
this production that expresses the
Czech national spirit in the latter
part of the 19th century.
Season tickets are on sale now
and individual tickets will be
available Monday.

Superior
1U' Students
Get Prizes
Cash awards for outstanding
achievement in economics have
been presented to two June gradu-
ates and one senior,
Lewis A. Engman, '57, of Grand
Rapids, and Brownson Murray,
'57, of Bloomfield Hills, each re-
ceived a Harold D. Osterweil Prize
of $50.
Robert L. Stahl, '58, of Park
Ridge, Illinois, was awarded the
$500 Sims senior honor scholar-
ship in economics for the coming
year.
The Osterweil Prize, established
in memory of the late Lt. Harold
Osterweil, is awarded to the out-
standing graduating senior con-
centrating in economics. It is
based on potential and social
awareness.
The Sims Scholarship was be-
gun by Ernest M. and Natalie C.
Sims of Elkhart, Indiana

University Started YMCA,
Plans Centennial Papers

The University was first in the
United States to organize a Young
Men's Christian Association and a
Student Christian Movement, De-
Witt C. Baldwin, co-ordinator of
religious affairs said last week.
The academic year 1957-58 will
mark the centennial of an organ-
ized religious program at the Uni-
versity.
Baldwin said a commemorative
volume, "The Michigan Papers,"
has been planned to record the
history of student religious groups
in America.
According to the first student
president of the University YMCA,
Adam K. Spence, the organization
was opened in December 1857.
Plans for the oragnization were
completed a month later and by
February, March and April of

1953, references to the YMCA pro-
gram appeared in campus publica-
tion..
After 1910, the student YMCA
ga e way to a co-ed Student
Christian Association which exist-
ed only until 1937 when the Stu-
dent Religious Association was
Sfounded,
Organized student religious work
at the University was responsible
for starting many pioneer projects
that led the way for similar work
in other universities and served as
a training ground for many reli-
gious leaders.
"Between 20 and 30 of the presi-
dents and officers of the student
movement here became leaders in
missionary and church endeavor
in many parts of the world,"
Baldwin said.

*AS 17 ~e Ut2A 7 th Ur
z~rn Thf

*
r1

t

Survey Research Center Finds
American Men Like To Work

I

._ . .r.. -----

A nation-wide study conducted_
by the University's Survey Re-
search Center has concluded that
four out of five employed Ameri-
can men would continue their
work even if it weren't necessary.
However, opinions vary consider-
ably between those workers in the
middle-class occupations and
those of the working class.
At. Abcording to Nancy C. Morse
and Robert S. Weiss, authors of
the survey, men in the former
group emphasise the interest to be
found in their jobs and the sense
of accomplishment which comes
from the success of their work.
On the other hand, members of
the working class, who art con-
cerned primarily with physical
Air-conditioned comfort is yours
while having your hair cut
in the latest styles.
715 North University

activity, view life without working
as a life without anything to do.
In accordance with this line of
thought, the study found out that
almost half the unskilled would
quit work if they didn't have to
earn a living.
But when all groups are studied
as a whole, the level of satisfac-
tion does not vary as greatly be-
tween different types of Jobs as
does the source of satisfaction.
.

I

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