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July 12, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SRIAT .llL 1 :h

ta aLa i vyul 1N 1l1U"

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,ommunication Problems
Vill Highlight Conference

JAPANESE ARCHITECTURE EXHIBITION:

Buddhist Monks

Were Original Tea Drinkers

The University's 28th Annual
Education Conference, designed to
offer teachers stimulating ideas
and to broaden the scope of the
education program for Summer
Session students, will be held Tues-
day through Thursday, July 16-18.
Mrs. Isabelle Mattson, a third
grade teacher from Union City,
will speak at the opening session
at 10 a.m. Tuesday in Architecture
Auditorium on "Communicating in
School."
A film, "A School Goes to Town,"
will follow her speech.
Included in the sessions will be:
"A Demonstration Group of Child-
ren Showing Self-Selection in
Reading Instruction" in the Ele-
mentary Library, University
School; "Teaching High School
Students to Express Themselves"
Professors
Read Papers
Papers will be delivered by two
University faculty members at the
international Gerontological Con-
gress in Venice and Morano, Italy,
July 12 thru 19.
Presenting the works will be
Wilma Donahue, chairman of the
Division of Gerontology, and Prof.
Wilbur Cohen of the School of
Social Work.

in Schorling Auditorium; and
"What's This, Miss Jones?" in
Elementary Auditorium, Univer-
sity School.
Prof. Alice Miel of the depart-
ment of education and acting head
of the Department of Curriculum
and Teaching, Teachers College,
Columbia University, will speak at
9 a.m. Wednesday in Architecture
Auditorium on "Building Socially
Useful Meanings Through Read-
ing."
A luncheon for children's librar-
ians will be held at noon in the
Michigan Union.
Film previews will be held again
in Schorling Auditorium at 1 p.m.
followed by special interest session
at 2 p.m.
They will be: "Books, Children
and the Future" in Schorling
Auditorium; "What's New in Books
for Teen-Agers" in Elementary
Auditorium, University School;
and "Helping Children Find the
Right Books" in Elementary Cafe-
-teria, University School.
The afternoon special interest
sessions at 2 p.m. will be: "Com-
munication Arts and the Gifted
Child" in Schorling Auditorium:
"The Reluctant Child in the Class-
room" in Elementary Auditorium,
University School; and "Communi-
cation Arts and', the Retarded
Child" in Elementary Cafeteria,
University School.

By CARL JORDAN
Did you ever wonder what a
Japanese tea house was really for
and how the tradition originated?
Tea drinking was first prac-
ticed by Buddhist monks to keep
awake during meditation in study
halls, then later in connection
with other ceremonies.

Gradually it developed into a
gathering to discuss the artistic
merits of certain objects, such as
a scroll painting, bowl and flower
arrangements, or the treasured
utensils of the tea service.
Architecture on Display
The Japanese architecture exhi-
bit now on display at the Rack-

-Daily-Richard Bloss
HOSEI GRADUATE SCHOOL-A post-war photograph shows
style as influenced by the West.

I

I

RC

VICTOR
CAMDEN

BIG NAME RECORDINGS
AT HALF
THE BIG-NAME PRICE!
12" LP's, only 1.98

ham galleries not only has ex-
amples, in pictures, of a Shinto
shrine, Buddhist temples, palaces
and castles, tea houses, gardens,
and contemporary architecture,
but along with them gives inter-
esting bits of information and his-
tory about Japanese architecture,
such as the tea house.
Implements of the tea ceremony
are displayed also.
The exhibit is organized histori-
cally. The first pictures are of a
Shinto shrine of a century B. C.
Shinto was the original, and still
is the dominating religion of Jap-
an.
Expression of Religion
A member of thecommittee
which organized the exhibition
said the Shinto religion is ex-
pressed in the architecture.
Shinto is a veneration of na-
ture, and a oneness of humans,
trees, animals, and all nature.
This is expressed by the simplicity
of the architecture, importance of
gardens, and the effort to achieve
unity with the house and the gar-
den.
The early priests gathered in
mystic glens or by waterfalls, not
to pray, but to contemplate and
meditate.
Rebuilt Periodically
The Shinto shrine is torn down
and rebuilt every 20 years because
in Shinto, nature does not make
monuments, but lives and dies,
always renewed and reborn.
The display contains many
views of the Imperial Palace in
Kyoto, including the moon-view-
ing platform. The Imperial Palace
exemplifies Japanese architecture
at the height of its esthetic devel-
opment.
An outstanding feature of the
old architecture is that the build-
ings are exclusively wood and are
built on short stilts because of the
many heavy rains and earth-
quakes.
The houses themselves are very
simple, and flexible. Often, only
a removable screen or panel di-
vides the rooms, or the inside from
the garden. Again this is part of
the oneness with nature.
Lack of Furniture
There is a lack of furniture
withinrthe dwellings. All people,
including the old emperors, sat
on the mats, or tatami, placed on
the floor. The rooms were kept as
bare as possible. If a piece of fur-
niture was not being used, it was
put away. A visitor might have
entered during midday, and seen
no furniture at all.
It was stored in "niches" cov-
ered by panels. This idea is ex-
pressed in modern American de-
TONIGHT at 8
Department of Speech
Presents
MOLIERE'S
ROLLICKING
COMEDY
THE
SCHOOL
FOR
WIVES

$1.50-- $1.10-- 75c
LYDIA MENDELS$OHN
THEATRE

-Daily-Richard Bloss
KYOTO PALACE--Esthetic development is shown in this photomural in the Rackham Galleries.

sign by sliding doors, simple and
not space consuming as swinging
doors. There is an example of a
special niche set aside for a trea-
sured art work of the family.
Rooms were measured, not in
feet, but by the number of mats
they contained. A wealthy man
might have a "five tatami room."
As you follow the exhibit
around, you come next to the
Buddhistic influence from China.
Buddhism regarded being in the
world as an art requiring a great
personal discipline. Therefore, the
environment is organized in ac-
cord with austere philosophies.
But in the Buddhist pagodas,
the original Japanese art is still
strong, with the overall simplicity
in the curving roofs, but inlaid
with intricate detail. The result

is neither Buddhistic, nor Shinto,
but a beautiful combination of
both.
Gardens play an important part
all through Japanese architecture.
They contain almost no grass, but
many rocks and sand arranged
into patterns. 4
Some of the most interesting
pictures at the exhibit arey of the
gardens.
The Japanese loved trees, and
would lovingly pluck out the dead
needles of a pine tree one by one.
They also liked to collect in-
teresting stones for thei' gardens
while on a hike, or just perhaps
contemplate them and be at peace
with nature.
The exhibit ends with the ef-
forts to blend modern architecture
with the traditional Japanese.

This presents a great problem,
for wooden construction materials
and mobility of walls are inherent
in the old style. Modern buildings
require cement and immobility.
The two are not yet ready to
adapt to each other, but progress
has been made.
One thing that is lacking in the
exhibit is color.
If you have ever seen the beau-
tiful greens, golds, and jades in
Japanese architecture, you will
miss them here. But the exhibit
is worthwhile and complete, and
gives the casual visitor an insight,
not only into elementary archi-
tecture, but history, religion, and
the Japanese people.
All in Color
FRED MACMURRAY
in Gun For a Coward
and
ERROLL FLYNN
in ISTANBUL

t,

HONORS WILSON:
Foundation Expands Number
Of Fellowships to 1,000

I

" TOSCANINI & NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC sorcerer's apprentice
rossini overtures and others.
* STOKOWSKI & PHILADELPHIA ORCH. nutcracker suite
(tchaikowsky)
" KOUSSEVITSKY & BOSTON SYM. peter and the wolf (prokofiev)
" KOSSEVITSKY & LONDON PHILHARMONIC "eroica" symphony
(beethoven)
" STOKOWSKI & PHILADELPHIA ORCH. new world symphony
(dvorak)
" MONTEUX 6 SAN FRANCISCO SYM. symphony in d minor
(franck)
* KOSSEVITSKY & BOSTON SYM. pictures at an exhibition
(mussorgsky)
* RICHARD CROOK songs of stephan foster
" ARTHUR FIEDLER & BOSTON POPS capriccio italien (tchaikowsky)
" ARTHUR FIEDLER & BOSTON POPS music of strauss
* STOKOWSKI k HOLLYWOOD BOWL symphony no. 6 "pathetique"
(tchaikowsky)
0 DICK LElBERT music in a mellow mood
* RICHARD CROOKS sings oratorio, arias & songs of faith
* LAWRENCE TIBBETT sings operatic arias
* STOKOWSKI & PHILADELPHIA ORCH. symphony no. 5
(tchaikowsky)
* THE CRUCIFIXION (STAINER) richard crooks, lawrence tibbett
" GOLDM*N BAND concert in the park
" BOSTON POPS six overtures
" RICHARD CROOKS sings songs you love
0 BRUNO WALTER & VIENNA PHILHARMONIC symphony no. 41
/ (mozart) "jupiter"
' JOHN JACOB NILES sings american folk songs
! STOKOWSKI & PHILADELPHIA schelomo (bloch) with FEUERMAN
" GUY LOMBARD and his royal canadians.
" SAMMY KAYE music for dancing
" JESSE CROWFORD at the organ
" ART OF JOSEPH LHEVINNE
" ALLAN JONES sings great show tunes
* GLADYS SWARTHOUT opera
" MARIA JERITZA in opera
" GLADYS SWARTHOUT in opera
" STOKOWSKI & PHILADELPHIA ORCH. mozart requiem mass k.624
0 WAYNE KING let's dance
* THE VOICE OF MILIZA KORJUS
. GIOVANNI MARTINELLI in opera and song
" CHARLES COURBOIN organ music of franck
* LUBOSCHUTZ AND NEMENOFF two-piano classics
* LA SCALA OPERA CO. i trovatore (complete)
* ROSE BAMPTON !n opera
t RAY McKINLEY one band, two styles
0 TONY PASTOR the tony pastor style
* HAL MACINTYRES BEST
" THE DEEP RIVER BOYS
* RHAPSODY IN BLUE (gershwir) BOSTON POPS
" CLAUDE THORNHILL dinner for two
* GOLDEN GATE QUARTET sings favorite spirituals
* THE ART OF PADgEREWSKI
" FREDDY MARTIN Nhnusic of jerome kern
0 STARDUST tex beneke
* AL GOODMAN songs from hit musicals
* MY FAIR LADY, MOST HAPPY FELLA instrumental hits
f THE ART OF GUISEPPE DI LUCA
* RALPH FLANAGAN dancing down Broadway
* JEANETTE MACDONALD smiling through
" TOSCANINI NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC (mozart) haffner
symphony
* VAUGHN MONROE dance with me
" GREAT JAZZ PIANISTS oscar peterson, art tatum, earl hines
" BIGGEST HITS OF '56 polly bergen, jonnie guarnieri, others
" ELIZABETH RETHBERG operatic arias
" GREAT JAZZ REEDS sidney bechet, lionel hampton, others
* GENE KRUPA mutiny in the parlor
" ART OF LUCRETZIA BORI
* DOROTHY MAYNOR sings spirituals and sacred songs
" JOHMNY GUARNIERI cheerful little earful
" AL GOODMAN for you alone
! CALYPSO wilmout houdini
* GERALDINE FARRAR in carmen
0 WAYNE KING the night is young

uauI~y-11Uinarl UBioss
SUMMER IMPERIAL PALACE-A picture of this traditional-type
structure, several centuries old, is now on exhibit in the Rackham
Galleries.
Delivered
By Ann Arbor
SPEEDY DELIVERY
With Warming Oven Equipped Truck
1 pizza -75c
I2 or more- 40e each
DELIVERIES MADE EVERY HOUR.
From 7:30 P.M. to 11 :30
Phone NO 2-9442
FOWLER'S Coffee Shop
We also CHICKEN - SHRIMP - SCALLOPS
deliver: STEAKS - CHOPS - SANDWICHES
2204 West Stadium Blvd., Corner Liberty

Thednumber of fellowships
awarded by the newly-formed
Woodrow Wilson National Fellow-
ship Foundation will be expanded
from 300 to 1,000 for each aca-
demic year, Prof. Richard C. Boys,
of the English department, an-
nouniced here today'.
The foundation was incorpor-
ated under Michigan laws on July
8 at the first meeting of its board
of directors, following a grant
of $241/2 million from Ford Foun-
dation.
Superseding the National Wood-
row Wilson Fellowship program
(originated at Princeton Univer-
sity in 1945), the foundation is
dedicated to helping superior stu-
dents enter the teaching profes-
sion.
Prof. Boys, the foundation's
national director, indicated its
offices will remain temporarily in
Ann Arbor, where they have "been
for the past year.
He reported that five fellowships

from the new foundation's funds
have been granted to University
students for graduate work this
fall, and that 12 students from
other institutions will study here
under the program.
Candidates for fellowships are
nominated by local faculties and
then interviewed by a regional
committee made up from diverse
fields.
BURT LANCASTER
in THE RAINMAKER
in color
and
HUGH "WYATT EARP"
O'BRIEN in BRASS LEGEND

n+-
'4 "
I -I

More Fun
Than A
BarrelOf
Monkeys?

4

PLAY

MINI GOLF
The Modern
Miniature Golf Game

Ypsi-Ann Golf Course Next to
Ypsi-Ann Drive-In Theatre

U

F

UNIVERSITY
SUMMER SESSION
Presents
B HASKAR
& SASHA

The NEW WH RV
Presents
The "Headless Horseman"
BEAUTIFUL CARL-and- SHARP FRANK
(Marriage is a Living Death) (A Swinging Cat)
6:35 P.M. . . Monday thru Friday

I

1600

WHRV

1600

I

AUTHENTIC
INDIA DANCERS

I

I

Friday Evening, July 19
8:00 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
Reserved Seats 75c, $1.00
ON SALE NOW
HILL BOX OFFICE

ELIGI BLE TO JOIN?
DANCIN
Friday and Saturday Nights
V*f*A Members and Guests
Mary Lou
314 EAST LIBERTY

s
Vii''

Ending
Saturday

d IA m

DIAL
NO 8-6416

A

ENDINGI
TODAY
IUSVEliIEE WALTER BRENNAN
MAAVDWERS SIWNEY iLACdNER MILDRO hArWICK-.Jayweay

DIAL
NO 2-3136

Ends
Satorday

- DIAL
NO 2-2513

Starts SATURDAY
Free 8x1 0 Gloss Photo of Pat Boonc
To First 500 in Line Saturday!
PAT BOONE.

I- mss U o - - -. s

li AMI& AML V& AV

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