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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 03, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-03

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1957
EXCHANGING IDEAS
Lasting Works Shown at Library
By ERNEST ZAPLITNY

THE +I HIGA DAILY

PAGEhT

CLASSIFIED

ADVERTISING

A display entitled "The Bridge
of Books" now at the General Li-
brary is helping to debunk Rud-
yard Kipling's adage about the
East and West never meeting.
To be featured through the
month of July in the library's main
lobby are books, old and new,
from the timeless East amid samp-
les of Western literature about
Asia and Asians.
Selected classics in their original
language are shown, as well as
translations of notable works from
either side of , the diminishing
East-West barrier.
Medium of Understanding
"Books are a medium of under-
standing," says G. Raymond Nunn,
in charge of the Far Eastern Li-
brary of the University Library,
who assembled the display.
"They are a principal means of
exchanging ideas between our cul-
tures." He adds that research is
enriched and knowledge broadened1
by possession of classics in the
original.
Ancient wood-block printing
and palm leaf manuscripts demon-
strate that literature is more than
the art of book-binding.
'Lasts A Thousand Years'
"True literature lasts a thou-
sand years," write Tu Fu, a Chi-
nese poet of the eighth century
and the exhibited translation of
I-ching (Book of Changes) as-
cribed to King Wen, circa 1150
B.C., is effective testimony that his
words are not mere eloquence.
Of interest are volumes of In-
dia's twin epics, "Ramayana" arid
"Bhagavad-Gita;" the latter
("Song of God") is counted among
the world's great philosophic
works.
There is a Japanese translation
of "Merchant of Venice." A vol-
ume written in English by a Ja-
panese professor, on Sandro Boti-
celli is part of an accepted stan-

r
I

-Daily-Richard Bloss
EAST-WEST DISPLAY-The twain are meeting on a bridge of books.

dard work on that Renaissance
painter. '
Reflects Thinking
The exhibit reflects a wide range
of thinking and activities of the
two cultures. Included are a trans-
lation of "Analects," from Confu-
cius; books written by modern
Asian leaders: Jawaharlal Nehru,
Chiang Kai-Chek, Mao Tse-Tung;
copies and photostats of the re-
cords of a seventeenth century
Japanese feudal.family.
There is a study of coal pro-
duction in Communist China pub-

lished under the auspices of
Rackham School. A Chinese trans-
lation of "Autobiography of Ben-
jamin Franklin" arrests attention
-it was published in Peking in
1956.
The title of one book points to
the idea of the exhibit, and to the
idea of culture exchange in gen-
eral It is a translation by the
American Pearl S. Buck of a popu-
lar sixteenth century Chinese
story. As translated, the title is
a noble thought: "All Men Are
Brothers."

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI F1
We carry a complete line of HI F1
components, some of which are
Bozak speakers, Viking tape record-
ers, and Rei-O-Kut turntables.
Audio Supply
Laboratories
334 Nickels Arcade
NO 2-7767 NO 2-9425
(Above Bay's Jewelry)
)Xl
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS.
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)X5
HI Fl STUDIO
An amazing inventory of Hi F
components available to you at
catalogue price.
KITS
We stock amplifier, AM-FM tuner.
and speaker enclosure kits in sev-
eral brands.I
HI FI SERVICE
Our engineers and technicians are
fully competant and equipped to
service all equipment we sell, and
to advise you on the selection of
components.
1217 & 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595
)X2
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER ACCOMMODATIONS avail-
able at law fraternity for all stu-
dents. T.V. and cool rooms. $1.00 per
cday. On Hill and Forest. Call Don
Dodge at NO 2-5614. )E5
TWO MEALS, $2 per day, five days a
week-Mon. - Fri. Call Stuart Powell,
at Phi Kappa Tau, corner Hill and
Tappan. NO 3-8581. )E2
ROOM AND BOARD for summer. Very
reasonable. Room $6 per week. Board
3 meals daily, $2.30. 5 days per week.
For information call Al Szemborski,
NO 2-8312, 6-7 p.m. Alpha Chi Sigma.
)El
PERSONAL
WHERE ELSE could you get Newsweek
at less than the price, of a news-
paper-$3 a year, 6e an issue-but
at Student Periodical, NO 2-3061.

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
TI RE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard - NO 8-8429
)S2
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business. At-
las tires, batteries and accessories.
Warranteed & guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new & used tires.
Road service - mechanic on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168 )S1I
PETS AND SUPPLIES
TROPICAL FISH aquariums and sup-
plies, Hamsters, Parakeets, etc. New
shipment of tropical plants just ar-
rived.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 East Liberty N03-0224
(Open daily except Thursday)
)T1
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS -- Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and de-
livery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J1
GOLF LESSONS-Private instruction.
$3.00 per lesson. All phases of the
game taught. Call NO 8-9052 be-
tween 5 and 6 P.M. daily.
USED CARS

PHOTO SUPPLIES
GADGET BAGS
Durable Vinal
$1.49
THE QUARRY, Inc.
320 S. State St. NO 3-1991
I )D2
FOR RENT
FURNISHED APARTMENT: $75 per
month during summer. Living room,
kitchen, bedroom, bath. Three blocks
from campus. Phone NO 5-1832 or NO
2-3111 ext. 31. Reduced in price for
summer. )C16
ROOMS FOR boys - reasonable - near
campus. Call NO 8-8681. )C17
COOL CAMPUS apartments, some
rooms. 514 S. Forest. Call NO 2-1443.
)C9
CAMPUS ROOMS -Bargain summer,
rents, men students, clean, neat,
furnished singles & two-room suites.
Perfect location. Call NO 8-6205. )C8
NEED a fourth person for summer for
a beautiful four room apartment near
campus. Call NO 3-2277. )C3
VACANCY FOR one girl to share with
two girls five room apartment-(two
bedrooms, living room, study room,
kitchen, TV.). One block from cam-
pus. $95 for entire summer, If inter-
ested, contact Mrs. Domm, NO 2-1290
or Gerry Laube, NO 3-8843 or NO 3-
0975. )C13

Amt

)G2

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Blue glasses in plastic pencil
holder. Call Katherine Anderson.
NO 2-3159 )Ai
LOST-A man's gold wedding ring. In-
scribed-Together with Mary, 2-27-54.
Contact J. Evans, 3726 Richfield Rd ,
Flint 6. Michigan, Reward. )A2
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED-To San Francisco,
leaving on or about July 5 Call NO
2-2328 after 7 p.m., or weekends. )G3
WANTED: SOMEONE to share driv-
ing to San Francisco with congen-
ial group. Gas paid. Low expenses.
Leaving July 8. Call NO 3-8438. )G6
SPECIAL WEEKEND RATE
for Avis Rent a Car
from Friday, 5 P.M. to Monday 9 A.M.
$10 plus $.08 a mile
gas, oil and insurance furnished,
12, nearly new, Reasonable.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE sport shirts. $1.75, 2
for $3.00. Washable. Assorted colors.
SAM'S STORE
Phone NO 3-8611
122 East Washington
)B2
REFLEX CAMERA with accessories. R.
Burns. 804 Monroe, Apt. 3. )B3
HELP WANTED
ANN ARBOR
EMPLOYERS PERSONNEL
504 First National Bldg.
NO 5-6107
)H8
WANTED MEN AND WOMEN. Work ac-
cording to own schedule. Good in-
come potential, besides work you'll
be sure to enjoy if you like meeting
people. For Interview call NO 848951
between 9 and5. Evenings between
7 and 9. NO 5-5077. )HI
PROFESSIONAL service staff man.
$5,100 per year and car expenses. Age
28-39. Ann Arbor Emiployers Person-
nel, 504 First National Bldg. Call NO
5-6107. )H10
FAST accurate typist. Full or part
time. Days, evenings, weekends. Elec-
tric typewriter experience helpful.
Call NO 2-9829. )H9

Rent A Car
514 E. Washington St.
Phone NO 3-4156

1937 OLDS for sale. A-1 condition in.
side & out. Call NO 2-7640. )N2

..

NOW
and Thurs.

. TAT -

DIAL
NO 2-3136

"STUNNING!

MAGNIFICENT!

ELEMENTARY CHANGES:

i

HunsickeF Urges Sports At Early Age

Enough to set the beholder longing
to fly away to that place."
..*..Bosley Crowther, Times
DARRYL F. ZANUCKCS
COLOR by DE LUXE ylcWuh , .
CINEMAScoPE

STARTS
TODAY
One of the sweetest, most tender love stores ever filmed.
WINNER
OF
MHE GRAN PRIX INTERNTIONAL
Grand Prizse winner of hw Ccuwns n Festival
Special Award of the Berlin Fil Festivali Intro-
ducing ULLA JACOBSON, the Screen's greatest
4tar discovery since INGRID BERGMAN.
x
BECAUSE OF THE
DELICATE THEME
ADULTS ONLY I
M~m: .mEM 1R'

Elementary school level physical'
education is the great vacuum in
American education.
This is the opinion of Prof. Paul
Hunsicker, of the physical educa-
tion, department.
Pointing out that most elemen-
tary school children in the United
States do not have regularly sche-
duled physical education classes,
he adds that 91 per cent of our
elementary schools have no gym-
nasium and a sinilar percentage
lack play space areas..
"Teachers," he stresses, "should
recognize that there is a tremen-
dous gap between what is being
offered and what the child is cap-
able of doing "
Child Can Learn
Calling for a "more challenging"
program, he contends that, among
other sports, skiing, golf, skating,
basketball, bowling, wrestling, and
tennis can all be taught to the
child.
Noting that some teachers will
argue a lack of space for such
sports, he submits that this does
not prevent teaching the skills and
Marra Says
Good Timber
Seen Again
Timber will again soon become
an important product of Michi-
gan, according to Prof. Alan A.
Marra of the School of Natural
Resources.
For years the Pacific Northwest
States have held a monopoly on
the panel wood industry because
of the high quality timber neces-
sry for plywood.
But, Prof. Marra said, since the
development of particle board, a
new product which promises to
revolutionize the wood-using in-
austry, use can be made of Michi-
gan's low duality trees.
In the past few years, the
' abundant supply of jackpine, as-
pen, and scrub oak has been near-
ly worthless because of the small
size and other undesirable quali-
ties of the trees.
Any kind or shape of wood ,can
be used to make particle board
because the wood is reduced to
chips, slivers, sawdust, shavings
and splinters, and glued together
by a special process. Waste prod-
ucts from other wood using in-
dustries can be used also.
Michigan has one particle board
factory in Hart, and several more
companies have plans to build
more.

lead-up games preceding the activ-
ity.
He contends that the child has
ability to master "college level"
physical education courses "by the
,time he is ten years old." More-
over, the learning rate is often
greater in younger years and the
youngster has more time for prac-
tice than the college student.
'Fringe Benefit'
Prof. Hunsicker deplores tlie fact
that too often physical education
is considered a "fringe benefit."
Nor, he asserts, can "recess" be
considered a course in physical
education.
"The physical education teacher
should realize that the mastery of
a motor skill is one of the few
things which the child retains
throughout life," he says.

"Under ideal conditions, the
child of 13 would have mastered
the requisite sports skills to enable
him to enjoy a variety of recrea-
tional sports."
Take Five Steps
It is Prof. Hunsicker's feeling
that the proper approach lies in
the following five steps:
1) start physical education in
kindergarten and continue through
elementary school;
2) hire able and sympathetic
teachers;
3) make the program challenging
by teaching sports skills and lead-
up games;
4) expand present program con-
tent to appeal to more students;
and
5) make the student realize the
need for taking- part in sports.

James MASON
Joan COLLINS

* Joan FONTAINE
* Harry BELAFONTE

I

* Starts FRIDAY

*

,

I

The NEW WHRV Presents
FILIPIAK'S MATINEE
With STEVE FILIPIAK
3 P.M.-6:30 P.M.

"Top Of Your Dial"
WHRV

Filipick

1600

1600

I

wE
63
fi
U. of M. Summer Session Presents
in A Uthentilc In dia Dances
Hill Auditorium -8 P.M. Friday, July 19
Mail Check for your Tickets NOW, to
06.1
U. of M. Summer Session, 3510 Admin. Bldg.
i.: ,n Autetc ni Dne

s

SHORTS and TANK TOP in matching solids
$2.95 and $3.95
See he, and other sebarates by the hundreds -

1

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