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July 24, 1957 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH MIHIA It.. , AITaa .

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1957

9-
6.

Collins
.DRE S
Cotton -Silks -

$13.

Shop
IES
Chiffons .
/ $19.
Were to $35.00
BETTER DRESSES
1/3 Reduced
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MICHIGAN THIRD TO COLUMBIA:
Foreign Student Population Growing

4'

by TOM HENSHAW
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer

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JERSEY DRESSES

i

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SUITS

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SHORTIE COATS... 1/3 Reduced

Accessories

Drastically Reduced

Costume Jewelry
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t Lingerie
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The United States is becoming
an educational mecca for foreign
students eager to partake from the
font of American technical, social
and cultural know-how.
The Institute of International
Education recently completed its
annual head count of scholastic
visitors for the 1956-57 academic
year and found 40,666 students
from 136 foreign lands enrolled at
2,956 American schools.
The institute, a non-profit
agency which administer exchange
programs, also found most of the
foreign students studying techni-
cal subjects. like engineering and
the sciences: medical, social, phy-
sical and natural.
Michigan Leads
New York, California, Michigan
Massachusetts and Illinois schools'
attracted more than 45 per cent of
the visitors.
The accompanying map shows
the general areas of the world from
which the students came, the
states in which they attended
school and, in broad categories,
the subjects they studied.
An American education was par-
ticularly popular with students in
those parts of the world where
people have only recently acquired
a strong sense of national feeling.
Nearly, a third (12,949) of the
foreign students came from the
Far East while, the awakening
Middle East (5,243) sent nearly as
many as populous Europe (6,005).
Latin America ranked second to
the Far East with 9,110 while
North America (Canada and Ber-
muda) sent 5,444, Afric 1,424 and
Oceania (Australia, New Zealand
and thie Pacific Islands) 424. Sixty-
seven were listed as stateless.
Canadians Largest
The largest single national group
was the 5,379 Canadians. Single
students came from a dozen states
including Algeria, Monaco and the
Middle East sheikdoms of Bahrein
and Qata.
Five Far East nations followed
Canada-China (including those
stranded by the Red conquest of
the mainland) 3,055, Korea 2,307,
India 2,144, Japan 1,870, and the
Philippines 1,714.
The general field of engineering
attracted the most foreign stu-
dents (9,057) but studies in the
humanities (liberal 'arts, theology,
etc.) also rated high (8,524).
Social sciences were studied by
5,859, physical and natural sci-
ences, 5,732, medical sciences 3,854,
business administration 3,485, edu-
cation 1,982, agriculture 1,469, oth-
ers 675, no answer 389.
Generally speaking, students
from Europe and the English-
speaking world came 'here to study
the humanities while those from
the less developed lands came to
learn crafts and sciences.
BusAd Attracts
Business administration was the
top drawing card as a single sub-
ject (3,485) followed by mechani-
cal engineering (2,526). Theology
was a surprisingly solid third
choice (2,304).
Far Eastern students went in
particularly strong for the study
of An erican business methods. It
was the top choice of those from
Indonesia, Japan, Korea, the
Philippines and Thailand.
Mechanical engineering domin-
ated the thoughts of those from
the Middle East, with most coming

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from Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon
and Syria. Strangely, the study of
political science drew the largest
number of students from Saudi
Arabia.
Theology rated high with stu-
dents from a number of countries,
particularly Australia, Britain, the
Netherlands and the predominant-
ly Roman Catholic nations, Ire-
land, Spain and Mexico.
The big state universities and
the venerable and famed eastern
institutions played host to the
largest number of foreign students.
institutions played host to the
California Ahead
The University of California, with
large campuses at Los Angeles and
Berkeley, topped the individual
schools with 1,473. Columbia was
second with 1,356.
Then, Michigan 1,109, New York
University 1,021, Minnesota 798,
Illinois 780, Harvard 708, Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology
661, Wisconsin 630, Texas 573,
Cornell 543 and George Washing-
ton 428.
The institute survey also turned
up the information that roughly
three out of four foreign students
were either self-supporting or re-
ceived aid from private organiza-
tions.
Less than 7 per cent received aid
in any form from the United States
government and 5 per cent were
subsidized by their home govern-
ments. The source of support of the
others was not disclosed.
Mayor Asks
Senator's Aid
Ann Arbor's mayor, Prof. Samuel
Eldersveld of the political science
department, recently urged sup-
port of a measure to create a
Federal Department of Housing
and Urban Affairs.
In a letter to Sen. Patrick Mc-
Namara (D-Mich.), Prof. Elders-
veld said that since his election as
mayor, he had been "impressed
with the magnitude of the housing
problem."
He commented that the problem
was especially impressive in "cities
growing as rapidly as our own."

(Continued from Page 1)

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University Leads Nation
In Foreign Students

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Excluding Canada, China rank-
ed first with 106, followed by.
India, 105; Turkey, 77; Japan, 54;
Venezuela-(fifth), 44.
"On a trip around the world
last year, I learned that this uni-
versity is' preeminent in many
Asian countries, particularly those
that have not been British colonial
areas," Prof. Davis said.
Students Attracted
"We attract foreign students
by giving them a, superior aca-
demic experience," he noted, but
added that the University has no
recruiting prograim, with the ex-
ception of special law school
courses under Ford Foundation
auspices, and an internation jour-
nalism grant and exchange agree-
ments.
Students not rec'eiving American
or home government aid are large-
ly self supporting, Prof. Daivs said.
He estimated that some 80 re-
ceived Whited States government
or United Nations scholarships.
He ,reported that Thailand,
Burma, Iraq, Turkey and Egypt
were prominent in home govern-
ment support of students here. A
smaller number came from Ethi-
opia and Liberia. Such students,
he said, are sent here for training
in a certain field and are generally
expected to work for their govern-
ment. Iraq, for example, requires
'a year of government service for
each supported year of study.
Among the 1,780 processed last
year, 48 were classed as "perman-
ent residents" - refugees from
eight East European nations.
Yugoslavia, however, has spon-
sored two students, Proif. Davis
said.
ELI Leads Field
The English Language Institute
as a single field attracts the larg-
est number of foreign enrollments
according to statistics obtained
here.
Of the 1,780. foreign students
processed during the past year,
ELI Director Prof. Robert Lado
reported that 563 were enrolled
in the Institute.
The program provides training
for both students and teachers.
More than 50 per cent of those
taking training as students are
from Latin America, Prof. Lado
reported, while Far Eastern coun-
tries led in the teacher's program.
"With the inclusion of teachers,
we have the largest and most
thorough English program, and
are usually acknowledged as the
best here and abroad," he said.

He described the ELI method as
"scientific isolation and analysis
of student problems in sounds,
sentence patterns and cultural
meaning.
"Specifically developed oral tech-
qiques establish use of the langu-
age as a habit," he added.
The effliciency of the method
was attested by Ruth Goodgall
Pruna, a teacher from Central
University in Santa Clara, Cuba,
enrolled here for the summer
session.
She became acquainted with the
ELI method in 1947 while at

.

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MRS. RUTH PRUNA
..testimony from Cuba

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STATE and LIBERTY
Summer Store Hours: 9:30 to 5:30, Mon. thru Fri.
Saturday, 9 to 1

Columbia University where it was
being used by a former University
ELI instructor.
She used ELI materials and
methods in a private school in
Cuba, and her success with them
led to her employment at Central
University.
Method Complete
"The ELI method of teaching
English to speakers of Spanish
constitutes the only complete and
graded method based on the find-
ings of linguistics science," Mrs.
Pruna said,
She judged it far superior to
Basic English and the Direct
Method.
Mrs. Pruna alsonoted the repu-
tation the University had in such
Latin and South American coun-
tries as Cuba through the Institute
program.
The teaching methods at her
school, Mrs. Pruna said, specify
only the University's ELI program.
She was once even chastised for
mentioning Columbia University
on a printed program in addition
to the University, although the
Columbia method referred to was
an adaptation of the University's.

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Notes

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