100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 24, 1957 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, YULY 24,1957

'. E MICHIGAN DAILY

'A+C EryN'T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?AGE NINE

RETIRING ARCHITECTURE DEAN:
Bennett Watched College Grow,

LIBRARY WORKSHOPS:
Elementary School

Service'

Set as Topic

____

USE ON STILTS-The tenants will be virtually correct when
y say they are going "up" to their apartments..
artmwent House on Stilts
rings Change in Ordinance

By JOHN S. DeMOTT
They're'building it on stilts..'
It's a new apartment house, the
kes of which Ann Arbor' and the
tate of Michigan have never seen
efore. To construct this "building
' the sky," builder John4 Stege-
ian and architect James Living-
on had to urge a change in the
ity's building ordinance
"She's climate conditioned,
)und conditioned, fire condition-
1, and color conditioned," archi-
ect Livingston chuckled. The
)undation is now complete and
he entire building is to be finished
y September.
Eight Islands
Each of the eight . apartments
ill be "an island of privacy,"
ccordin gto Livingston. Each will
ave forced air gas heat, complete
athroom and kitchen facilities,
nd two bedrooms.
To insure adequate soundproof-
ig, eight inches of reinforced
iasonry plus eight inches of dead
ir separate the first upper level
rom the second.,
In addition, the 74-ft. by 46-ft.
195,000 structure will have air
onditioning and television in each
om. The building will be totally
reproof, but just in case, a self-
>wering fire escape will be acces-
ble to all occupants.
Neighbors on Geddes near Ob-
ervatory will be surprised as ten-
,nts drive their cars up the drive-.
ay-and under the building. As
he glass enclosed stairwell is ap-
roached, a many- colored Vene-
an tile mosiac is passed.
Doors lass
A tenant will push the glass
oor to the stairwell aside and
alk across the glass sided lobby
o the battery bf aluminum mail-
oxes.
He'll have no trouble recogniz-
ig his mailbox because it, will
ear a small color chip, the same

color as the door to' his apart-
ment. This is Livingston's concept
of "color conditioning," a new idea
in modern architecture.
The occupant will now climb
the glass-backed "suspended"
staircase, each step bearing a tile
of different color, and reach the
"first upper level."
He'll recognize his apartment by
the color of the door, and flip a
quiet mercury switch upon en-
tering.
Room Spacious
From the door, he'll step into
the spacious living room.
A glance to the right will reveal
a 14-foot floor to ceiling glass wall
facing a nine-foot, cantillevered
"color conditioned" patio balcony.
A partition in the floor-to-ceiling
glass wall will slide open, giving
access to the balcony.
Lighting in the living room will
come from large Scandinavian
floating plastic bubbles. They will
be suspended near the cherry-
paneled wall opposite the glass
wall.
Facilities Furnished
Each "kitchenette" will be fur-!
nished with' a built-in washer-
dryer, electric range, and subdued
lighting unider wall cabinets. All
appliances - like the mailboxes,
doors and balconies-will be "color'
conditioned."
Livingston, a 32-year-old Uni-
versity graduate, picked up the
idea of an apartment house on
stilts while traveling through
'Switzerland on a Booth Scholar-
ship. "They use stilts in Switz-
erland because of overcrowded
conditions," he said.
The structure, to be called the
Geddes Apartments, will provide a
sharp contrast between the new
and the old. Tenants will be virtu-
ally correct when they say "I'm
going up to my apartment!"

By JOHN WOODRUFF
Fellow of the American Insti-
tute of Architects, practicing ar-
chitect, past president of two ar-
chitectural professional, associa-
tions, member and former mem-
ber of several campus committees,
Dean of University's College of
Architecture and Design and a
product of Red Greek, N.Y., Wells
I. Bennett is about to retire from
the University.
Dean Bennett came to this cam-
pus in 1912 as an instructor in
what was then a department in
the College of Engineering. In
those days, "there were about 50
students" interested in making
their way as architects, he recalls.
Since then the former depart-
ment has become a college in its
own right. It has also grown to the
point that it now includes some
600 students.
Syracuse Graduate
Dean Bennett studied at Syra-
cuse University and received his
bachelor's degree in architecture
from that institution. He then
came to the University for his
master's degree.
He has put his learning to use
in varied capacities. In World War
I he served in a construction divi-
sion in the army, and in World
War II he was on a committee of
the Manpower Commission.
Dean Bennett is a Fellow and a
Past President of the Detroit
chapter of the American Insti-
tute of Architects, an honorary
professional organization. He has
also been on the institute's execu-
tive committee on honors awards.
Active on Campus
Active in campus affairs, he is
completing his second term on
the council of the University's En-
gineering Research Institute.
He is also in his second term as
chairman of the Fine Arts Divi-
sion of the Rackham School's
Committee on Research Grants,
the group responsible- for distri-
bution of the institution's study
funds among faculty personnel.
In addition to these and other
"spare time activities," Dean Ben-
nett considers that his principle
interests "have been jny practice,
my teaching and the administra-
tion and building of the architec-
ture school."
Size Important
The building of the school has
been more than a matter of size.
In the 20 years of Dean Bennett's
administration, the college has
grown in stature until now it is
generally conceded to be among
the finest in the United States.
Within the last three years the
school has been divided into de-
partments of architecture, art and
landscape architecture.
Turning his attention to the fu-
ture, Dean Bennett says, "While
such decisions are for the incom-
ing administration, not the out-
going, to make, I personally look
upon urban planning as a rapidly
growing field."
Due to his being extremely busy
as head of the College of Archi-
tecture and Design, Dean Ben-
nett's private practice has been
limited mostly to residential work.

Three workshops under the au-
spices of the Department of Li-
bi ary Science will be held during
the period of Aug. 5-16.
Fifth annual School Library
Workshop will be on the theme
of "Planning Elementary School
Library Service."
Participnats will study the rela-
tion of classroom libraries to the
central school library, and exten-
sion services available from state,
county and public libraries.
Workshop will be conducted by
Prof. Irene Hayner and Mrs. Edna
Bullard Mack, both of the library
science department,
Library Buildings Workshop will
be conducted by Edna Hanley By-
ers, librarian of Agnes Scott Col-
lege in Decatur, Ga. She is the au-
thor of "Colleges and University
Library Buildings."
Emphasis of the course will be
on the planning of a library build-
ing which can best serve the needs
of the institution.
Workshop on Mechanizing In-
formation for Research will in-
clude lectures on co-ordinate in-
dexing and the logic of its use in
manual and mechanized informa-
tion services.
Price To Present
Carillon Recital
Percival Price, University Caril-
lonneur, will present the last in a
series of Thursday evening caril-
Ion recitals at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Burton Tower.
The final program will include
compositions and arrangements
for three-aui d-a-half- octave car-
illon.

Course will include workshop cer of the Division of Engineering
investigation of the techniques in- and Industrial Research of the
volVed and the preparation of a National Academy of Sciences-
co-ordinate index. National Research Council will
C. D. Gull, administrative offi- conduct the course.
Bargain Days Special
Save Over 50% and More
300 Pairs Womens, This Spring
and Summer Dress Shoes
Reg. to $12.95
Pair
306 South State

-Daily-Richard Bloss
DEAN WELLS I. BENNETT
. .in urban planning, an increasing field for architects.

Pointing out the area's relation-
ship to urban design and noting
that site planning is a fast-grow-
ing occupation, Dean Bennett
comments that University of
Michigan campuses are them-
selves a rapidly increasing field
for architects.

It is Dean Bennett's hope that
after he leaves his desk at the
architecture college he will be.
concerned mostly with consulting
and general planning work for
religious centers, campuses, school
boards, municipalities and similar
organizations.

k

- -.. .9 :"'"'',; -: t'.:}:::'i::i::'. ::i:'.:'. !*R v+f..:. t:.W:.,..... .Y

ANN ARBOR S

BELTS
Orig. $1 00 t
GLOV
Orig. $2 00
cotton, nylon
Fina
Orig $5.98
Orig. $13.
%. A collection
silhouettes, f

."

o $6.00; straw, leather, o
ES . d l w
to $12 00 be o
sheers, leather, string glo

0 0 0 5

1/3

Off !

1
/2

ofi

and more

d Clearance of
and Summer
HATS
Bto $12.98 ...
98 to $16.98.....
of fashion's most be
abrics and colors.
BLOUSES
$4
8 Orig. $8.98
:tions on cotton, cotton-c<
es and shirts. Short, roll
length sleeves in soli
18.
ildren'sMV

iOc to $3
r metal.
1 to $
yen nylon and
wes.
Sprng
autiful shapes,
Orig. $10.98
acron, silkand
II-up, long and <
ids and prints. ~?
Veal"

Store Hours 9:00 to 5:30 During

Ann *r
A-rbor Largain

Bargain Days
Days

Dresses

Coats

Swim Suits
Blouses
Separates
Accessories

13
to
O2
OFF

tremendous savings on fashions you want now
for the remainder of the summer, for
vacation and for wear into the months ahead
DRESSES--COATS
SUITS- ENSEMBLES
SWEATERS- JUMPERS- RAINCOATS
SHORTS-BERMUDAS-PEDAL PUSHERS
SLIPS-PAJAMAS- PETTICOATS
SHORTY GOWNS--ROBES
HANDBAGS--JEWELRY

ti
fl.
1
0,':
d
is , .
.'.I
Kiss
*: i"
J7
iii

PLAYSUITS. .$2-$3-$4
Orig. $3.50 to $5.98; one- and two-piece cottons in
solids, prints, stripes. Sizes 3 to 6x, 7 to 14.
BERMUDAS. . $2and $3
Orig. $3.00 to $4.98; solid and stripe cottons in
sizes 3 to 6x, and 7 to 14.
PEDAL PUSHERS $2 & $3
Orig. $3.98 to $4.98; solidl and stripe cottons in
sizes 3 to 6x, and 7 to 14.
SHORTS . . $1.39-$2-$3
Orig. $2.00 to $3.98; sizes 3 to 6x, and 7 to 14 in
a selection of solid and patterned cottons.
BLOUSES . $1.50-$2-$3
Orig. $2.50 to $3.98; to coordinate with shorts and
pedal pushers; sizes 3 to 6x, 7 to 14.
JACKETS . .$
Orig. $4.98 to $8.98; sizes 3 to 6x, and 7 to 14.
DRESSES . .-$3-$4-$6
Orig. $5.98 to $10.98; pretty assortment of colors
and patterns in cotton; sizes 3-to 6x, 7 to 14.
COATS. . . 7 and $12
Orig. $16.98 to $25.00; all wool, 3 to 6x,7 to 14.

:
I -:
:
::
f
i
c
:::}
n
.
r::r
%
;,
f
of '
r
f }
';:1
ti
1;

Orig. $4.9
Further reduc
nylon blouse
three-quarter
Sizes 10 to 1
Ci

I,

Extra Special:
Famous Make,
$18

Cashmere Sweaters
Discontinued Styles
and 123

SHOES$
Troylings, Jocelli,
Town & Country.

Save on summer's smartest dress and casual s
at a fraction of their original prices. Navy, i
beige, brown, two-tones; calf, broadtail, straw,

hoes
l te,
/85
/85

Carmelette
orig. $12.98-$14.98

$7

CHI
Orig. $5.501
and girls dre
Dark tones a

LDREN'S Si
$3 and $4
to $8.98; school oxfords,
ess shoes; including some
nd pastels.

HOES
straps, sandals,
Edwards shoes.

Regularly to $32.95

$b85

and $7

dd '""" r} ; 3Zia;.;.;.;.::;r,":;":"; ",r,:;:'r:?+:5:+.":":e: isi?"Y"7i r'r;:+},:":"Rd? ^::":':":"F.":Sj? 4'.?:v%":": r. i}:{?:5+,.?:{ ,:"yr,":r,;.'"p
G,... .... .........,.. r ................. i%:"$:....: :..:::i .... Yu. .:r.".i" ..."86 Fv}.5, .$.v'.t{a e:'ยข..":"a'.''rrr1I

m II9 -_-N I

I III

0 f 1w - - 0 111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan