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July 17, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-17

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TUESDAY, JULY 17, 1958

THE MICMGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, JULY 17, 1 9 5 6 THE MICHIGAN JJAILY PAGE ThRW

Summer Camps Entertaining, Educational

CLASSIFIEDS

To students pounding away at
their books during summer session
on the campus, it may seem that
the rest of the world, and especi-
ally the rest of the students, must
be stretched out on some breeze-
swept, sun-drenched beach, just
being plainly, pleasantly lazy.
Some of them may be there-
but then some of thea may be
at one of the University's summer
camps, learning themselves or
helping others to learn.
It may be at the music camp
at Interlochen, the Speech Im-
provement Camp at Northport, the
Biological Station near Cheboy-
gan, the forestry camp, the geol-
ogy camp in Wyoming, or the
Journalism students at Evart.
Wherever they, are they are
working.
So turn the page of the book
and begin the next assignment.
The musicians, the speech correc-
tionists, the zoologists, botanists,
'~foresters, geologists, the journal-
ists and the parasitologists, the
dancers and the ornithologists are
all in there plugging with you.
Even the pleasantly lazy ones
on the beach may tie thinking of
you..,
State Auditor
Investigation
May Be Called
CHICAGO (P)-A top Illinois
Democrat last night called for a
special legislative session to in-
vestigate all state departments in
the wake of the resignation yes-
terday of State Auditor Orville E.
Hodge.
Herbert C. Paschen, his party's
nominee for Illinois governor,
declared in a statement:
"It is evident that in as much as
Hodge has not audited himself, he
most likely did not properly audit
the other departments of state
government.
"A thorough investigation of all
departments is imperative."
Paschen, who earlier had de-
manded that Gov. Stratton call a
special session of the Legislature
to bring impeachment proceedings
against Hodge, said the resigna-
tion of the state auditor "does not
alleviate the situation."'
Linguistics Panel
Albert H. Marckwardt, Director
of the Summer Session Linguistics
Institute, will be the chairman of
a panel discussion, "Linguistics
in the Teaching of Composition"
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Rackhamn
i Amphitheater.
Other members of the panel will
be Seymore Chatham of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, John H.
Fisher of Duke University, James
Downer and John V. Hagopian of
the University of Michigan and
William Schwab of Michigan State
r University.

FOR SALE
1951-BUICK Convertable $400. Call
John Richard, on. 324 Wenley. NO-2-
4401.)B,
FOR SALE -- 1953 Labnretta Motor
Scooter. Reasonably good condition.
More than 100 miles per gallon. $190
NO 5-5585.
1951 Studebaker, inexipensive transpor-
tation, Radio and heater. $90. NO-5-
4361. )
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms,C it-
chen, Living and Bedlrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. :~bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oiL. Very good
condition. $2,500 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Diamond ring in Virginian Res-
taurant, Sentimental value. Rewvard.
Phone NO-2-0379. )A
PERSONAL
HILLSDALE GRADS. Reunion noon,
Wednesday 18th. S. Entrance Univ.
Elementary School.)F,
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM witki board and garage
privileges for gentlemen, Also a suite
for two, Call NO 8-7230. )C
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156. )S

HELP WANTED
- -G1ADUATE STUDENTS MALE-
Over 22. to work 25 to 40 hours
per week. To help tun patient pro-
gram working w Nith psychiatric pa-
tients. Should have some experience
in group activities. $1.72 an hour
wage Mlust be available for at least
nine months. Apply personnel of-
fice or call Ext. 526 University Hos-
pital. )
PAR T-TIldE service station man. Week-
ends and nights. Inquire at 101
Beakes St. 1H
SECRETARY-To assist in psychologi.
cal work in Detroit. $70 a week. Typ-
ing required. Some college experience
essential. Call NO 2-5742 evenings.
)H
H ELP WANT ED-MALE
ASSISTANT DRIVER-to Florida one-
wav, leaving on or before Aug. 1. Ride
board, lodging enroute. Reference.
required. NO 2-1590. )S
BUSINESS SERVICES
GRADUATE EXCHANGE ST UDEN T
from Paris studying linguistics. Wish-
es to tutor French. Call NO-3-1416. )J
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately I Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

BOYS . . . at the Speech Improvement camp play "Whang Ho" for any extra desserts, extra help-
ings of food in main course. Counselors such as Ralph Rupp are the umpires in the game. It's
complicated, but they know how it works, and they don't stutter when they say "Whang Ho" either.

THE COLD, DARK ... unpleasant things that are found in and
under rotten logs at the Biological Station hold no fears for grad
students Betty Gage and Jim Bowen. The field trip, which started
out in the rain, was one of many such excursions which start out
every day from the station. Eight weeks at the station is anything
but a vacation.
MYSTERY, TERROR
Detective Stories Recognized
As Honest Literary Form

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS . . . represented among the Interlochen's 2000 students during the
summer. These wom n are part of a group studying modern dance. They stay at the camp for the
full eight-week session.
IMPORTANT SMALL POINTS
University's Fishing Expert Gives Advice

Most people don't read detective
stories just to experience a cold
thrill on a hot summer day, ac-
cording to Richard C. Boys, associ-
ate professor of English. .
"Probably most people read de-
tective s t o r i e s for relaxation,
though this does not necessarily
mean that no thought is involved.
Many look on them as a puzzle,
an intellectual game," Professor
Boys says.
He points out that until fairly
recent years the reading of de-
tective stories was a vice indulged
in by many but admitted openly
by few. "In our own day the de-
tective story has established itself
as an honest literary form with
many respectable followers," he
states. "We know that President
Wilson read J. S. Fletcher at night
before going to bed, and that the
late President Roosevelt was an
avid fan."
The charge is often brought that
most detective stories are poor in
quality and that the good ones are
rare. "But good ones are written
Just the same," the English profes-
sor asserts. "A few writers of de-
tective storiescould hold their
heads up in any literary circle.
Dorothy Sayers, for example,
writes detectivetstories which ap-
proach our best novels. And Eric
Ambler, Graham Greene and Ray-
mond Chandler at their best are
good indeed."
Professor Boys explains that the
term "mystery story" is usually
used loosely to include all branches
of this literary form, the adventure
story, the spy story, tales of ter-
i I-

ror, tales of the supernatural, and
the "pure" detective story. "Some
of the best writing is found in
tales of international i n t r i g u e,
particularly in the works of John
Buchan and Eric Ambler," he says.,
He continues, "Another kind of
mystery story, the ghost story, is
considered by most fans to be an
inferior sort, and a similar judg-
ment is usually made about tales
of sheer terror, though Dracula
and Boris Karloff will always have
some admirers."
Professor Boys points out, that
the tale of mental terror is very
much in the foreground these
days, in part because of Holly-
wood's preoccupation w i t h the
type. "The real master of this
school is Graham Greene, who has
turned out several first-rate books.
"THE MOON
IS BLUE"
FINAL WEEK!------
Curtain 8:30 P.M.
Admission $1.65
Please phone Saline 31
for reservations
SALINE MILL THEATRE
U.S. 112---/2 mile west of Saline

-*--T-A-T E-
DIAL NO 2-3136
The most
Heart-Warming
Romantic

:.. ;,...

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L .-__

er c onN(.!n{"4 en Goo 'tq

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DIAL NO 2-2513
The Top Show
of
Hope's
Career .
WARM.
HILARIOUS...
APPEALING . .
Gom
3I LEY TCF IO
Monday thru Frjday
EVENINGS ONLY
at 7 and 9 P.M.
Next Attraction - -
"The Eddie Duchin Story"

I

Spectacle
ever put
to Music!
DARRYL P.2ANUCK
prs..nts

f

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If you'rt a sport fisherman who
finds himself smack-dab in the
middle of the fishing season with
a pretty poor percentage of strikes
to your name, maybe you're for-
getting some of the important
"small" points of fishing.

Trmedou Value
SAL
of our BETRD
Sizes 7-15, 10-44, 12%
Tails 10-20

Take some tips from the Univer-
sity's fishing expert, Prof. Karl F.
S in our
/-241/,

Lagler, who heads the Department
of Fisheries.
"Too many fishermen concen-
trate on the big things of fishing,
like wangling a time to go, finding
a boat to go in, a place to go to,
and out-talking the wife, who'd
rather go on a picnic," he says.
They forget about such things as
accuracy, stealth, wise choice of
lures, care of hooks and some
other factors which are "all im-
portant to him who would mess up
a skillet!"
First of all, learn to be an ac-
curate caster, says the professor.
Overshooting or undershooting the
target louses up the good holes
and tears down your estimation
of your fishing ability, he points
out.
Pick out a target in the back
yard and try casting at it until
you can hit it withing thinking
about fundamentals, he recom-
mends. "Once you've mastered ac-
curacy you've surmounted the
greatest obstacle facing most cast
fishermen."
As for stealth, you have to stalk
the larger game fish, Professor
Lagler maintains. "Wear dark.

clothes, stay down in the boat and
be quiet; the only noise a fish
should hear is that of your lure
falling on the water."
He agrees with the well-known
friend of the fishermen, Homer
Circle, that choosing lures wisely
is a very , significant part of
catching a fish. "If you're fishing
in weedy waters don't use a lure
that is constantly hanging up.
Try a good weedless lurp with a
pork chunk," both men advise.
And don't use a shallow running
lure in deep water. If the water is
calm try a topwater splasher and
vary its action, trying a noisy re-
trieve, a fast one, a quiet slow
one, they say.
"Try different colors too," Pro-
fessor Lagler suggests, although
fisheries scientists can't give ex-
planations for why fish are some-
timesattracted to one color, some-
times to another.
Don't be afrai dto slam you hook
home with zeal when you've got
a strike, the professor adds, and
those hooks should be sharp!
And if all else fails, just sit back
in your boat and troll.'

Organization
Notices

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Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Informal mid-week tea, today, 4:30 to
6:00 p. m., Guild House, 524 Thompson.
FOR THAT
NEW HAIRCUT
FTO FSIT THE
SUMMER
715 North University

I

the loafers you'll live in
and love this summer.

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If you appreciate the finer things -in life ., . . then
now is the time to buy finer fashions at JULY,
CLEARANCE PRICES. Prints, Cotton Orlon, Wool
Knits, and many others can be found in ensembles,
summer suits, dresses and after five fashions.

I

OLDMAINE TROTTERS
HANDSEWN
CLASSIC MOCCASINS

,;. t'_'.
yz

Same

Day

Service

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..

,,
.a
i t
'
..
- ., :;_
s ;:
>
2.,;
: r .:,
.
: =: ":

on

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Spring Suits, Coats and Dusters.
Many at 1/2 of original prices.
Jewelry and hats at a fraction of
their original prices.
For the loveliest fashions in town
of quality and styling . . . shop at

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-

WASH AND DRY BUNDLE
Cash and Carry
In by 9:00 ... Out by 4:30
* SPARKLING CLEAN
* TUMBLED FLUFFY DRY
* FOLDED and WRAPPED

Relax in our famous
Oldmaine Trotters
comfortable, lithe and
flexible loafers.... the softest
casuals you've ever worn
for complete summer

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IU t-- - -- A -.---_-I --° W R

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