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July 07, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

liaiE AIC"16AA "A"V

SATURDAY- 1111,V I_ I

YQUU ~A'II1RIIAV 3IIIV~ lean - -,, ~ w ~

a i A U KV",M n o d Ul/Z 4, 1;1,JV
IF"

4

Tigers,

Returning

to

Form,

Lose,

14-0,

to

Chisox

Redlegs Keep NL Lead;
Yanks Win 50th Game

SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS IN BRIEF:
Thomson Wins Third Straight British Open

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO --- Southpaw J a c k
Harshman shut out Detroit on
seven hits last night and belted
out a three-run homer in pitching
the Chicago White Sox to a 14-0
triumph over the Tigers.
It was Harshman's fourth shut-
out of the season and his sixth
triumph against four losses. De-
troit failed to get a man past sec-
ond base until the ninth inning.
Bill Tuttle opened the ninth with
a double, moved to third on a

to an 8-4 victory over Washington
last night, gaining the Ameri-
can League leaders their 50th
triumph of the season.
Turley had to be rescued in the
ninth after a spell of wildness but
earned his fourth win against two
defeats.
The Yankees, playing with in-
jured Mickey Mantle sitting de-
jected on the bench, pounded two
Washington pitchers for 11 hits
and capitalized on some shoddy
fielding to run up their margin.
A brief Washington uprising in
the ninth chased Turley and re-
sulted in two runs before reliefer
Tom Morgan ended things by
forcing Roy Sievers to ground out
wit hthe bases loaded.
Braves 5, Cubs 0
MILWAUKEE-Joe Adcock and
Henry Aaron backed up the f our-
hit shutout, pitching of Warren
Spahn with home runs as the Mil-
waukee Braves defeated the Chi-
cago Cubs, 5-0.
The victory kept the Braves in
second place, three percentage
points behind the Cincinnati Red-
legs and three points ahead of the
third place Brooklyn Dodgers.
Lefthander Spahn, master of the
Cubs all the way, posted his
seventh victory in 14 decisions. He
struck out four and walked only
one. It was his third shutout of
the season and the 37th of his
career.
Dodgers 2, Phils 1
PHILADELPHIA-Randy Jack-
son smacked a two-run triple to
back up Carl Erskine's neat five-
hitter as the Brooklyn Dodgers
defeated Robin Roberts and the
Philadelphia Phillies, 2-1.
Both pitchers gave up only five
hits apiece. Erskine gained his
sixth victory.
Roberts was saddled with his
10th defeat against eight wins.
* * *
Indians 4, A's 2
KANSAS CITY-Jim Busby tied
a major league record by smash-
ing his second grand slam home
run in as many games to give the
Cleveland Indians a 4-2 victory
over the Kansas City Athletics.
* . *
Two Postponements
Two games were postponed last
night because of rain and threat-
ening weather in the East.
To be played on a later date are
the Baltimore at Boston American
League contest and the National
League game between Pittsburgh
and New York at the Polo Grounds.

WARREN SPAHN RANDY JACKSON
. . . chalks up another shutout ... enough to beat Roberts

DEFEATS ROSEWALL:

JACK HARSHMAN
... hurles, hits for victory
wild pitch and stayed there as
Harshman walked Red Wilson.
Then he retired the next three'
men.
The slim lefthander walked four,
struck out three and hit, one bats-
man.
Harshman's homer, his second
of the season, came in the second
inning.
Redlegs 6, Cards 4
CINCINNATI-Home runs by
Ted Kluszewski and Ed Bailey and
10 other hits off four pitchers help-
ed Cincinnati's Redlegs overpower
the St. Louis Cardinals, 6-4, con-
solidating the Red's slim hold on
the National League lead.
Don Gross, who started for the
Reds, and collected the win, yield-
ed eight hits before Hershell Free-
man relieved him in the seventh
inning. Freeman allowed only two
more dardinal hits in nailing down
the victory.
** *,-
Yanks 8, Senators 4
WASHINGTON -Bob Turley
fast-balled the New York Yankees

ISingles Croi
ByHoad at
WIMBLEDON, England (A) --
Low Hoad defeated Ken Rosewall
6-2, 4-6, 7-5, 6-5 for the Wimble-
don Men's Tennis Championship
yesterday and gained his third of
the world's four major 1956 titles.
It was the first all-Australian'
championship match since 1922,
when Gerald Patterson won the
title.
The big Australian, who plays
power tennis the way an oldtime
fullback runs-by blasting down
the opposition-was too good in
every department of the game for
Rosewall.
Grid Critic
Now Sorryif
ROCKFORD, Ill. (A')-Nineteen-
year-old Jasper Laudicina, whose
critical comments yesterday about
Marquette University football and
Coach Johnny Druze got wide at-
tention, is "miserable".
He wants to forget about it all,
says his mother, Mrs. James Lau-
dicina, who scolded him for "talk-
ing so much".s
Mrs. Laudicina had young Jas-I
per on the carpet after the family
phone started ringing with inquir-
ies about a story published yester-
day by the Rockford Register-Re-
public.
The story quoted the Marquette
freshman halfback as saying
Druze held 10 more spring prac-
tice sessions than are permitted
by collegiate rules. Furthermore,
the story went on, Laudicina
thought"you'd have to be a dog"
to play under Druze's "rock-em"
system.
Athletic Director Larry Moon
Mullins of Marquette immediately
denied any violation of the spring
practice rules. This was "abso-
lutely false", Mullins declared,
saying the university's gridders
turned out for only the usual 20
spring sessions permitted by the
NCAA.

n Copped
Wimbledon
From his singles victory, Hoad
goes on to Forest Hills for the
American Nationals, the final ma-
jor tournament of the year. If he
wins in New York, he will be the
first man since Budge to take, in
one year, the Australian, French,
British and American titles.
Not satisfied with monopolizing
the singles final, Hoad and Rose-
wall went on to reach the final
in men's doubles, where they'll
meet the Italians Nicole Pietran-
geli and Orlando Sirola today. The
two 21-year-old Australians, doub-
les winners in 1953, whipped Art
Larsen of San Leandro, Calif., and
Bob Howe of Australia 4-6, 6-2,
7-5, 6-3.
These matches went according
to form, but the upsets which have
marked the 70th Wimbledon
Championships continued in the
women's doubles and semi-finals.
Third-Seeded Remain
There the first and second-seed-
ed teams were eliminated and the
third-seededecombination, Althea
Gibson of New York and Angela
uxton of England will meet an un-
seeded Australian pair, Fay Muller
and Daphne Seeney, in the final.
Miss Gibson teamed with Miss
Buxton to eliminate top-seeded
Louise Brough of Beverly Hills,
Calif., and Shirley Fry of St.
Petersburg, Fla., 7-5, 6-4. Miss
Gibson was an upset victim earlier
in the singles competition.
The two young Australian girls
beat second-seeded Angela Morti-
mer and Ann Shilcock, the defend-
ing champions, 6-4, 6-2.
Miss Fry, who beat defending
champion Miss Brough, and Miss
Buxton, the first English woman
finalist since 1939, will play for
the women's singles title tomorrow.

By The Associated Press
HOYLAKE, England-Austalia's
Peter Thomson, a chunky power-
house with a ready grin, casually
humbled an international field
yesterday and won the British
Open Golf Championship for the
third straight year-A feat un-
equaled in the modern game.
The Melbourne professional shot
nearly flawless golf for his 72-hole
total of 286, 3 strokes better than
his nearest rival, Belgium's sombre
Flory Van Donck.
Roberto DeVicenzo, an Argen-
tine now living in Mexico, finished
third with 290 after shattering his
own hopes for top money with a 79
yesterday morning.
The 26-year-old Thomson be-
son became the first man to win
this ancient crown three times in
a row since Scotland's Bob Fer-
guson did it in 1880-81-82, and
then the open was a much less
testing 36-hole affair.
Sochak Leads Americans
Mike Souchak, the ex-football
player from Berwick, Pa., was
the closest American to the flying
Aussie. Mike posted 294, 8 strokes
back, and finished in a tie for
seventh place with Antonio Cerda
of Argentina.
Frank Stranahan of Toledo,
Ohio, who finished second in two
British Opens as an amateur,
came in ninth with 296.
*I * *
Justice Department To Check
WASHINGTON - The Justice
Department has asked the Su-
preme Court to clarify the status
of professional team sports in re-
lation to the Sherman Antitrust
Act.
The department, which has long
First KO,
BROCKTON, Mass. (A)-As
any father knows, playing with
the kids can be risky. And re-
tired Heavyweight Champion
Rocky Marciano knows it now
too,
He was admitted to Brock-
ton Hospital yesterday with a
wrenched back, suffered while
tossing his daughter Mary Ann
in the air. Mary Ann is almost
four.
Dr. Nathaniel Gould, Marti-'
ano's physician, described his
patient's trouble as " a hitch in
the back". It is not serious, he
said, and Marciano may be out
of the hospital in a day or two,
or at most a week.
Marciano fought some of the
ring's best in 49 fights and
never lost a bout, never went
to the hospital.
It took Mary Ann to put him
on his back.

contended that such sports are
subject to antitrust regulation,
made the request in a "friend of
the court" brief field in behalf of
Willaim Radovicli, former pro
football player from California.
The brief contended Radovich is
entitled to a high court review of
the refusal of lower courts to con-
sider his private antitrust damage
suit against the National Profes-
sional Football League.
Radovich charged the league
flouts the antitrust laws by boy-
cotting athletes who violate the re-
serve clause in player contracts.
The reserve clause binds a player
to a club. Radovich contended he
was illegally excluded from pro-
fessional football.
The U. S. District Court at San
Francisco dismissed his case, cit-
ing old Supreme Court decisions

exempting professional baseball
from antitrust prosecution. The
dismissal was affirmed in the U. S.
Court of Appeals.
* * *
U. S. Crews Qualify
HENLEY - ON - THAMES, Eng-
land--The United States was as-
sured a finalist in the featured
Thames Challenge Cup event yes-
terday when two of her eights,
Princeton University's lightweight
crew and Ken School of Connecti-
cut, rowed to new victories in the
Henley Royal Regatta.
Placed in the same bracket, the
Yanks will race against each other
today for the rgiht to meet the
survivor of the other semi-final
race, pitting a group of workers
from the London docks against the
Royal Air Force eight.

Brewer Ties Mayer
POINT CLAIRE, Que. - Cay
Brewer of Cincinnati shot into a
tie for the halfway lead with Dick
Mayer in the Canadian Open golf
championship yesterday with a
total of 135.
Young Brewer fashioned a sev-
en-under-paw 65 over the Bea-
consfield course, equalling the re-
ord set Thursday by Bo Wininger
while Mayer added a 68 to his
previous 67. Brewer had an open-
ing 70.

~T

Come

to Church

Sunday

Major League StandingsI

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York .....
Chicago.......
Cleveland-.......
Boston ..«.
Baltimore.......
DetroitC......
Washington ..
Kansas City ..,..

W L
50 26
43 27
43 30
37 35
33 40
31 42
31 48
27 47

Pct.
.658
.614
.589
.514
.452
.425
.392
.365

GB
4
5,
11
15%
17Y.
20'1/3
22

Cincinnati.......
Milwaukee.....
Brooklyn.........
St. Louis.......
Pittsburgh
Chicago........
Philadelphia
New York .......

W L Pet.
42 30 .583
40 29 .580
41 30 .577
37 37 .500
34 35 .493
30 39 .435
30 42 .417
28 40 .412

11

GB'
6
6 ~
10%
12
12

. SPEEDWRITING

TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Boston
Detroit at Chicago
New York ,at Washington (N)
Cleveland at Kansas City (N)

TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N)
Chicago at Milwaukee (N)

* GREGG SHORTHAND
s TYPEWRITINNG
s ACCOUNTING
e OFFICE MACHINES
A Single or a Complete Course
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Day or Evening Classes

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mosses Daily at 6:30 A.M., 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.,
9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdah,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 arld 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Called to be
Pioneers."
9:30 A.M. Discussion group topic: 'Problems of
Christian Belief."
6:45 P.M. Meet to go together to the Congrega-
tional Church to hear John Bathgate speak on
his experiences while teaching in India.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur Zilligatt, Asst. Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon-"What Is
Your Motive In Serving God?"
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "THE CHURCH AND MORAL PURI-
TY."
7:00 P.M. "BELIEVING GOD IN THE STORM."
7:30 P.M. Wednesday-Prayer Meeting.
We welcome you.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:15 and 11:00 A.M.
Summer Fellowship for Students and Young Adults,
meet at Church at 5:30 for picnic supper; then
go as group to Congregational Church to hear
Rev. John Bathgate, recently returned from
India.
Bible Study, "The Apostle Paul." Wednesday, July
11th, at 8 o'clock,
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M. Church School classes from Nursery to
6th Grade.
10:45 Public worship. Dr. Parr will preach on the
subject, "Not what-but Whom?"
Reception of members. Coffee hour at close of
service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild will meet. The Rev. John
Bathgate of Allahabad, India will speak on
"The Christian Interpretation of India." The
Lutheran, Methodist, Baptist and Presbyter-
ian Student Guilds will be guests.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion at St. Andrews
Church (Followed by breakfast and speaker at
Canterbury House).
9:00 A.M. Family Service.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:00 P.M. Picnic. Cars leave from Canterbury
House.
8:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Commentary
(chapel).
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian R1formed
Churches' of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director,
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Meeting for Worship.
9:30 A.M.--Child care.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M. Bible Study-Book of Golq-
tians.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service,
6:00 P.M. Supper followed at 7:00 by Meet-
ing with other Student Groups-Speaker,
The Rev. John Bathgate, "Present India."
Tuesday-7 :30 P.M. Study of Christian Denomina-
tions,
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East HurL..
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
10:00 A.M. Student Bible Class will continue at
study on the book of John,
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship and Sermon-''Find-
ing Meaning in Life," Rev. Day,
6:45 P.M. Roger Williams Guild will meet in the
Guild House to go together to the Congrega-
tionalist Church to hear John Bathgate speak
on his experiences in India.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.-Professor Albert Morckwardt
of the University of Michigan English depart-
ment will speak on "Language and Social
Structure."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833AWashtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meetir.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 AM. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 PM.

f:

Charles To Face McMurty Next Friday'
In Fight Between Has-Been, Newcomer

William at State

Phone NO 8-7831

I

NEW YORK ()- -- E z z a r d
Charles, who has little future,f
and Pat McMurtry, who has little
past, meet in a 10-rounder at Ta-
coma, Wash., next Friday in what
is just another fight for one and
a tremendously important en-
gagement for the other.
There is something poignant
in the picture of Charles, who
oice was king of all he surveyed
as heavyweight champion of the
world, climbing through the ropes
in the role of trial horse.
The fading veteran-he'll be 35
Saturday -declines toarecognize
the 'passing of the years as he
plods along to nowhere.
An Enigma
He's always been something of
an enigma, this courteous war-
rior out of Cincinnati.
His finest hour was not while
he was champion. It was his first?
meeting with Rocky Marciano
when, battered and bleeding and
his face literally knocked lop-
sided, he stayed in there for 15
rounds when a less resolute man
would have bowed out when he
discovered the hopeless situation.
His worst performance was his
uninspired effort to win back the
championship from Jersey Joe

<

second bout with 1Marciano. He'd
had three chances to regain his
title, and failed. The future seem-
ed bleak indeed, and more than
one well-meaning critic has urged
him to call it quits.
But, because "fighting is my
business", he has remained ac-
tive, and next Friday he will be
making his 14th start since being
knocked senseless by Marciano in
September 1954.
McMurty, a handsome Tacoma
youngster has an impressive rec-
ord, with only a draw with Bob
Albright marring an otherwise
perfect record in 25 fights. But

his opponents to date have been
virtual unknowns.
McMurty Trying To Rise
The hard - hitting McMurty
couldn't be kept in cotton indef-
intely and expect to get anywhere
in his profession, and Charles
seems to be an ideal choice as an
opponent to determine whether his
dreams of ring glory are just an
illusion.
Ezzard has slipped far from his
glory days, but he is ring wise
and dangerous.I
If Pat can win decisively it
would be a tonic for the heavy-
weight division, which could use
one right now.

Stay-put comfort for a busy beauty!
Warner-Wonderful
Bras
Ifyou're up and down il
d'y you'll love Warner's*
cotton bra - with circle-

11

INow"

I

I

E4k

rent a bike by the month

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: 1 BIND MY
HEART.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THE CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD.

t I

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