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July 06, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-06

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FRIDAY, JULY 6, 1956

THE AlIC1t1IG DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, JULY 6,1956 TUE i~IIChI(iAN JJAILI PAGE THREE

CONFERENCE ON AGING:
Six 'U' Doctors To-Head
Health Problem Talks

Six University doctors will head
,clinical discussions cf health prob-
lems related to aging as part of
the University's ninth annual con-
ference on Aging Monday and
Tuesday.
In another portion of the pro-
gram Monday, state legislators
from Michigan, Massachusetts,
Ohio and Indiana will discuss
"Current Problems Facing Legis-
lative Bodies" related to the needs
of elderly persons.
4:The first clinic will be held at
2:15 p.m. Monday at the main
audtorium, Hospital.
Tuesday sessions, scheduled for
the same place and time, will in-
clude talks by Prof. Sylvester
O'Connor of the surgery depart-
ment, "Orthopedic Problems in
Relation to Arthritis and Vascu-
lar Disease"; Prof. A. C. Curtis,
chairman of the dermotology and
.,v syphilology department, "Derma-
tological Care in Old Age"; and Dr.
Moses Frohlich, chief of Veterans
Readjustment Center, "Psycholo-
gical Problems of Older People".
Both clinics are open to physi-
cians attending the conference.
Legislators scheduled to discuss
Fuibrig;_hts*
Announce
Two University faculty members
have been awarded Fulbright
grants to lecture abroad.
Prof. Watson Dickerman of the
education school will lecture in
adult education at Ochanomizu
Women's University, Tokyo, Japan,
and Prof. Henry L. Bretton of the
political science department 'will
lecture in political science at the
- University of Innsbruck, Inns-
bruck, Austria.
The grants are two of approxi-
mately 400 awarded for lecturing
and research abroad in the pro-
gram for the academic year 1956-
57. -
As provided by Public Law 584,
79th Congress, the Fulbright Act,
all candidates are selected by the
Board of Foreign Scholarships; the
members of which are appointed
by the President.
Lecturers and research scholars
are recommended for the Board's
consideration by the Conference
Board of Associated Research
Councils, which has been desig-
nated to receive and review the
applications of candidates in these
categories.
Funds used for carrying out the
program under the Fulbright Act
are certain foreign currencies of
credits owed to or owned by the
Treasury of the Vnited States.

problems related to elderly per-
sons .at the state level include
Rollo 0. Conlin, Tipton, Mich.;
Jess L. Dickinson, South Bend,
Ind.; Irene K. Thresher, Boston,;
Mass.; and Kline Roverts, Ohio
state representative.
Their meeting will be held at'
10:30 a.m. Monday in the Michi-
gan Union as part of Workshop II
of the conference. It is open to all
interested persons attending the
conference.
TOO Old?
MILWAUKEE P) -- John
Szues, who gave three young
strongarm. robbers. a .terrific
fight Wednesday night before
they stabbed him and took his
wallet, told police, "If I had
been 20 years younger, I'd have
licked them all."
Szues is 82. He took a bus to
a hospital to have hid wounds
treated.
He also told officers he'd be
happy to come downtown
Thursday and examine mug
shots of hoodlums, but not at
8 a.sn
"I need my sleep," Szues said
after his cuts were bandaged at
County Emergency Hospital.
"How do you expect me to keep
in shape?"
School Editors
To Attend
U' Workshops
Eight Michigan newspapers
have awarded scholarships to high
school publications editors to at-
tend summer Workshop Confer-
ences for High School Editors and
Publications Staff Members spon-
sored by the journalism depart-
ment.
Newspapers paying all the ex-
penses for the scholarship winners
include the Holland Sentinal,
sending three students; Flint
Journal, Port uron Times-Herald,
Royal. Oak Tribune, and the Ypsi-
lanti Press, each sending two stu-
dents; and the Hastings Banner,
Pontiac Press, and Sault Ste. Marie
News, each 'sending one student
to the summer program.
The workshop, now in its fourth
year, is divided into three 12-day
sessions between July 9 and Aug.
17. It is an intensive course for
students working on high school
newspapers, yearbooks, and maga-
zines.

Polish Riot
Study Asked
BReuther
DETROIT (/') -- United Auto
Workers President Walter P. Reu-
ther yesterday proposed that
Polish-speaking unionists from the
United State be admitted to Po-
land to investigate causes of the
workers' uprising at Poznan,
Poland.
Reuther cabled the proposal to
Stanislaw Wozniak, chairman of
the Voivodship Trade Union Coun-
cil in Warsaw. He urged the Polish
union leader to "arrange an im-
mediate visit to Poznan, Poland,
for the purpose of checking first
hand on the events leading to the
workers demonstration on June
28."
The UAW would send the dele-
gation and pay its expenses, Reu-
ther said.
Members of the group would
interview Poznan workers and in-
quire into such matters as wages
and working conditions, and what
the Polish trade union council has
been doing "to meet the problems
and advance the welfare of Polish
workers."
They also would ask:
1. "Was the demonstration a
revolt against injustice or the re-
sult of outside provocation?"
2. "What action was taken by
the government to suppress the
workers' demonstration?"
3. "What has been the fate of
the leaders and workers involved
in the demonstration?"
Reuther added: "The delegation
also would need to make free in-
quiry into other phases of the con-
ditions of life and work of Polish
workers that would enable an
American trade union delegation
to report the truth to American
workers and to the American
people generally on their return to
the U.S.A."
Unemployed
May Augment
DERO IT (P-If the nationwide
steel strike runs at least eight
weeks, Michigan unemployment
will swell to 300,000 in August and
320,000 in September, the Michi-
gan Employment Security Com-
mission said today.
The commission said some 22,000
Michigan workers were involved
now. At least 14,000 were out of
work in the steel industry and
8,000 in iron mining in the state.
If the strike continues for eight'
weeks, major trouble spots could
be the auto industry, foundries,
forges, applicated metals and ma-
chinery, the commission said.

IN TROOPER TRADITION:
Girl Scouts Defy Rain,
Carry On Activities

M2[LF'ORD, MICH. (OP)-It rained
today on the International Girl
Scout Roundup, but with the high-
land fling, the pole lashers, the
sandpainting and all, it was hardly
noticed.
One group of girls even braved
the chill weather to hike 25
minutes for a half hour swim in
nearby Teeple's Lake.
In spite of the rain, two Scottish
lasses gave a lively demonstration
of the highland fling and the Scot-
tish sword dance. Margaret Mur-
ray of North Berwick and Ishbell
Graham of Castle-Douglas apolo-
gized for the lack of bagpipes and
swords.
They did the dances with belts
replacing the swords and shoes in-
stead of traditional bare feet, be-
cause of the wet grass.
Out To Break Record
That was great while it lasted-
then came the pole lashers, out to
break a United States record.
Jo Lynn Swanson of Mission,
Kan., Pat Knight and Judy Bore-
sow of Kansas City, Mo., began
lashing an unsteady pole to anoth-
er as it teetered in the breeze.
Vicki Sheldon, also of Kansas
City, Mo., and Susan Renshaw of
Overland Park, Kan., explained
that this was called staff raising
and it was great sport.
Issue Sumumary
On Training
Many training programs for
business supervisors are handi-
capped because they do not modify
the basic attitudes of participants
or create the conditions necessary
for improving their performance.
according to a summary report
recently issued by the University.
The report - "Planning and
Training for Effective Leadership"
-was financed by the. Foundation
for Research in Human Behavior.
It summarizes results of two
seminars conducted by the Foun-
dation and Cincinnati chapter,
Society for the Advancement of
Management.

EEfl~vr'

Each pole is only five feet long,
and not more than an inch and a
half in diameter. The object is to
lash as many as possible together,
keeping them in the air.
Girls Still Trying
Paula Pachlhoffer of Mission,
Kans., said "We've tied the U. S.
championship of lashing together
nine poles for a total height of
40 feet, and we hope to beat that
today by raising 10 poles."
At last look, they were still try-
ing.
Seven girls from the Wild West
were grimly demonstrating Navajo
sandpainting in the rain, and ex-
pressing disappointment in muddy
Michigan sand at the camp site.
It seems it's no good at all for
painting backgrounds. Luckily the
girls brought Western sand with
them for painting purposes, in-
cluding white sand from New
Mexico.
The sandpainters are Darlene
McNair, Riverside, Calif.; Hope
Metcalf and Brenda Scott, Las
Vegas; Princess (CQ) Campbell,
Perris, Calif.; and Pat Robson,
Boulder City, Nev.
Piano Soloist
To Play Liszt
Prof. Robert Hord of the music
school will appear in his first Ann
Arbor piano recital at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
The program will include "Son-
ata in A minor, Op. 143" by Schu-
bert; three numbers by Debussy-
"La Terrasse des audiences du
clair de lune," and "Feux d'arti-
fice"; "Three Preludes for Piano
1951" by Halsey Stevens, to re-
ceive its first Ann Arbor perform-
ance; and "Sonata in B minor" by
Liszt.
Prof. Hord has appeared as
soloist with the Dallas Symphony,
Friends of New Music (Portland,
Ore.), Redlands owl, and Hemet
Bowl (Calif.).
The public is invited to attend.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATESI
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3,33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85 f-
Figure 5 average words to a line.t
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and I Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
FOR RENT
SHARE APARTMENT with male grad
student. Close and reasonable. NO-
31511 ext. 2875, between 10 and 11 or
1 and 2. ) C
FURNISHED APARTMENT-two blocks
from campus. From August 15, $75.
Phone NO-2 -0368. ) 3
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
for two. Call NO 8-7230.)C
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR TWO
$65.00 per month. Five minute drive
from campus. Phone NO 3-84-60. )C
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOMS AND/OR BOARD available for
summer session and fall. Nelson In-
ternational House, 915 Oakland. NO
3-8506.)E

BOARD
DO YOU need a place to eat this sum-
mer? We feature meals Monday thru
Friday. New cook. Alpha Chi Alpha
1319 Cambridge. Call NO 2-8312, and'
ask for house manager. S
ATTRACTIVE COUNTRY SETTING
Two-room, furnished apartment. Sep-
arate entrance, private bath. Students
preferred. NO 5-1364. )S
FOR SALE
HOME in southeast section. 4 large
bedrooms, living room, dinning room,
and breakfast room. Fine basement
with recreation room. Abundance -of
closet and storage space, gas-heater.
Attached garage, Drapes and parpet-
ing included. Priced at $27,000 with
liberal terms. Call NO-3-0123 or NO-
3-4300. )B
FOR SALE-Paasche model V airbrush.
Never used, $15. The Paint Pot, 707
Packard. Phone NO 2-0533. )B
SCHWINN BIKE, spdmtr. horn, gener-
ator lights, turn signals, stoplight. 3-
speed. Licensed. $50.00. E. Dutkiewicz,
917 E. Ann. )B
ARMSTRONG BIKE, cheap, good condi-
tion. 1135 Michigan Ave. )B
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses,-wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J

WANTED TO BUY
WOULD LIKE TO BUY -- girl's axed
boy's lightweight bicycle. Inexpen-
sive. NO-2-5704 after six.
PERSONAL
SPECIAL FOR SUMMER STUDENTS:
Time $3 (reg. , .6). Life $4 (reg. $6.75),
etc. Student Periodical NO 2-3061.
USED CARS
53 VOLKSWAGEN. Czean, custom set
covers. Phone NO 8-8771 after 6 P.M.
)N

I

Read
Daily
Classifieds

-CAMPUS--
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN-
105 F. Librt
NO 2-0675
for the Finest in Recorded Music
Saturday Summer hours (July-Aug.)-9:30-1 :00 P.M.

I

r

Enjoy PIZZA
at the
CIL RIO RESTAURANT
122 West Washington at Ashley
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
BEER and WINE served
Hours:, 11 A.M.-12 P.M. (Closed Tues.)
Phone NO 2-9575

I

v4~

I

Selecting your dinnerware?
You will want to see the many
patterns we have. They include
two new Gustavsberg patterns.

I

L

JOHN LEIDY

537 East Liberty

* NO 8-6779

I

I

IS

r C~-Jcto32 let Modern Gaoling

Shows 7:00-8:45

If

BOB

MARSHALL

HAS THE
BARGAINS

Big Beautiful Art Books
t CHINESE COLOR PRINTS OF TODAY
selected & introduced by Jan Tschichold.
It's impossible to describe adequately this
beautiful & delicate volume. 16 Chinese
prints in full color, all the size of their
originals, printed and bound in the tradi-
tional Chinese manner, plus a handsome
slip case. Reg. 8.95 4.98
" MAGNIFICO!
Here are 3 beautiful, beautiful big art
volumes, large folio size, cloth binding.
Each title has 12 full-color plates plus
34 to 37 black-and-whites plus authori-
tative text, real buys!
5. EL GRECO, text by Preston
6. VAN GOGH, text by Wright
7. TOULOUSE LAUTREC, text by Hans
Tietze.
Regular price is $4.75 per vol.
MY SPECIAL - each 1.98
R. H. Wilenski
A MfODERN RENCWH PAINTING

Turn a
Bol
Summ
WA

SHOP IN
COOL COMFORT
'd Shoulder to
ter in
e first Warner bra
ble straps that adjusts to
fashions (strapless,
halter, regular, wide
s-back). Embroidered
loth, thin foam
B, and C cups.
Warner wonderful bras,

No. 2065. Th
with convertib
six different f
halter, wide h
shoulder, cross
cotton broadc
underbust. A,
White, $3.50.
Try this and other

THERE'S ALWAYS A SALE AT BOB MARSHALL'S

next time you come in (let us trust this

I wv

I

it

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