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July 04, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-04

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_ WEDNESDAY, MY 4, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DATLY

rank TIM"

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1~?56 lUfF IYVICWT(AN DAIlY UA,~W 'Pfl'WWW

rAVa:G.3 £.RbGG

5

'U' Students
Get Awards,
Scholarships
Four University students con-
centrating in economics have re-
ceived awards for achieving high
scholarship in the area.
Gerald E. Kessler, '56, and Pas-
cal Pascoff, '56, were awarded the
Harld D. Osterweil Prize in Eco-
nomics for 1956.
Announced by Prof. Gardner
Ackley, chairman of the eco-
nomics department, the prize was
established by friends and associ-
ates of the late Lieutenant Harold
0. Osterweil, a 1941 graduate
honors student in economics.
It is awarded at the end of each
academic year to the graduating
senior concentrating in economics
who, in the opinion of the depart-
ment, "is the most outstanding
and promising student in the field
of economics and who has shown
the greatest degree of social
awareness".
Lewis A. Engman, '57, and
Brownson Murray, '57 were jointly
awarded the Sims Senior Honor
Scholarship in Economics for the
1956-57 academic year.
The Sims Scholarship is pre-
sented at the end of each academic
year to the student concentrating
in economics who, upon comple-
tion of his junior year, is deemed
to be the most outstanding and
promising student in this field.
The award was established by
Ernest M. and Natalie C. Sims of
Elkhart, Indiana, "in the interest
of stimulating intellectual rivalry
and high quality achievement in
the field of economics.
Plan Survey
Methods Study
For Institute
The ninth annual Summer In-
stitution Survey Research Tech-
niques will be held at the Univer-
sity Survey Research Center from
July 23 to August 18.
More than 400 government of-
ficials, businessmen, bankers and
college students have attended the
Institute over the past eight years
to improve their knowledge of
sample interview surveys.
Basedl on questioning of repre-
sentative members of a given
group, the surveys have proven
valuable in studying economic be-
havior, human relations, political
attitudes and similar subjects.
Nearly half of those attending
this year's Institute are expected
to come from government posi-
tions, including representatives
from the Far East, Near East,
South America and Canada.
The- Institute will offer intro-
ductory and advanced courses, to-
gether with workshops giving stu-
dents a chance to design ques-
tionaires, conduct interviews and
study data coding methods.
- - I

Pw W......
AFRICAI
FR. W. AFRICAF
-" QUATORIAL
"''-; ,/' "". ".. ,. 1 tAFRICA #
'*. i r NIGERIA r:?
1 ; ,t" '+s /ETHIOPIA
BERIA GO0
i* Y
...: -ENYA
.__ BEL. CONGO
_______.....I.
.00 . TANGAVYIKA_
M2 L ANGOLA[*
FEDERATION . \
efadzv aeerated OF RHODESIA V'
a hree-promged AOSlem e pan- -.- IA MOZAM8IQUE.
sxoz movernent which nay , i )
sweep all Avsfri ECHUANA- !
1 Achrekementoflndependence .
b tAe Sudanese A
2 The rise ofanfi-Wesferri UNION OF
nafiozals$zAFC
3 Adc/ilies of/he Islami~
congress sponsored hjziggypt ::L
~ A e.s e^,^

Prtincipa14j
Mfoslem
aqazr
Paga

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Islam Spreads to Central Africa

By WILSON WYNN
Associated Press Foreign Correspondent
CAIRO-The 75 million pagans
of Africa are the targets of a
three-pronged movement of Mos-
lem expansion which may envelop
the continent.;
Until the early 20th century,
Christian missionaries had strong
hopes these 75 million pagans
eventually would become Christian
and that Africa would become a
Christian continent. Developments
since the end of World WarII,
however, have done much to turn
these people toward Islam instead.
At the moment, practically all
the northern belt of Africa north
of the Sahara is Moslem, number-
ing some 62 million. Central Africa
is mainly pagan, while in the south
thre is a penetration of Christian-
ity in the white settlements there.
Islam Pushing South
Islam today is pushing south-
ward in three vital areas-through
the Gold Coast and Nigeria in west
Africa, and Sudan in central Af-
rica, and the Somalilands in east
Africa.
This southward movement has
been accelerated in recent months
by such things as the Sudan's
achieving independence, the gen-
erally anti-Western nationalism
sweeping over Africa, and the ac-
tivities of the Egyptian-spon-
sored Islamic Congress in Cairo.
The Sudan's declaration of in-
dependence last Jan. 1 may have

been a turning point in the race
between Christianity and Islam
to win over Africa's pagans.
The north Sudan isbMoslem,
but the three million blacks of
the south Sudan still are pagan.
During 56 years of British admin-
istration, the south Sudan was
sealed off almost completely from
Moslems of the north. Christian
missions were given a monopoly on
education among these pagans un-
til recently. Moslems from the
north could enter the area only by
special permission.
Will Spread to Sudan
Now that the Sudan has be-
come independent, the line be-
tween north and south likely will
grow thinner and may disappear.
Government schools will take over
from Christian missions as the
main source of education. Moslem
merchants and politicians will
move into the south. There will
be a heavy social, political, and
economic pressure on the pagan
Sudanese to choose Islam instead
of Christianity when he leaves his
pagan culture,
Although Christian missionaries
worked hard in the south Sudan
during the British administration,
they have not yet been able to
establish native churches strong
enough to resist the growing pres-
sures of Islam. And if the south
Sudanese turn Moslem, Islam will
be extended like a dagger-thrust
into the heart of pagan Africa.
The south Sudan is wedged in
among pagan regions like the Bel-
gian Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and
pagan sectors of Ethiopia. Once
the south Sudan becomes Moslem,
there is a strong possibility Islam
may creep across the frontiers to
neighboring areas.
Aided by Islamic Congress
The spread of Islam through
Africa is being nurtured from
Cairo by the Islamic Congress,
headed by Col. Anwar Sadat. This
international Moslem organization

is a pet project of the reformist
regime of Egypt's strongman,
Gamal Abdel Nasser.
One of the first objectives of
the Islamic Congress is to bolster
up Islam in primitive areas on
the perimeter of the Moslem world.
The congress is giving a high pri-
ority this year to Islamic educa-
tional programs planned for Ni-
geria and the Somalilands, two
primitive Moslem areas on either
side of the continent.
One big advantage for Islam is
that throughout much of Africa
Christianity still is considered the
white man's religion. Through the
Islamic congress, Islam identifies
itself with native nationalist move-
ments fighting to expeloEuropeans,
such as the Mau Mau in Kenya.
Hospital Pets
To Appear
Ont Television
Animals making up the "thera-
peutic faculty" of the Hospital
School of the University Hospital
will appear on a special production'
of television's Mickey Mouse Club'
Friday.
The program, "Happy Hospital,"t
will appear at 5 p.m. on WXYZ,
Channel 7.
Tame live animals that the
children play with during theirk
recreation hours in the School'sF
penthouse playroom featured on
the program include "Winnie" andt
"Philip"--two Costi Mundis-"Aro-C
ma" the skunk, "Cavey" the Per-
uvian Guiena pig, "Mortimer" thec
rat, 'Homer" the white mouse, fourt
rabbits and two parakeets.t
The animals are live therapy fore
the children who are away from
home, ill or disabled. Many doctorsc
report that giving them a chance
to forget their loneliness by play-
ing with these animals is in a lote
of cases better treatment than all
of the wonder drugs put together.
The Coati Mundis and pet skunk
are owned and cared for by May
Ann Bancroft, assistant director
of the Hospital School, who brings
them to the playroom each day.

Main Library
Mailing Plan
Serves State
More than a million pieces of
information have been searched,
packaged and sent to Michigan
residents by University Library
Extension Service in the last 38
years, according to Miss Clover M.;
Flanders, chief Extension Librar-
ian.
Miss Flanders notes that rural
schools in "less favored areas" use
the children's book service "as the
only means of introducing stu-
dents to current books for recre-
ational reading."
Postage to return the package of
pamhplets or other printed ma-
terial is the only cost to the bor-
rower declared Miss Flanders.
Booklists published by the Ex-
tension Service are used by li-
brarians and elementary school
teachers, as well as by parents, as
buying guides for book purchases.
In addition, Miss Flanders says,
many schools request help from a
consultant in improving their li-
brary resources.
"The play-lending service is a
real boon to the bewildered teach-I.
er assigned the task of selecting
and directing the school play.
Also, the annual debate bibliog-
raphy gives practical help to the
debate coach and his team in some
schools, and in other schools, to
whole classes formed into discus-
sion groups."
"It is a source of real pride to
the service that each letter or re-
quest is answered promptly," Miss
Flanders comments.
"The service send help of some
kind to 82 of the 83 counties in
Michigan last year. University
students in 32 communities had
access to over 3,000 books to add
to their professional background."
'U' To Start
Traffic Study
University traffic and highway
researchers this month will begin
a thorough study of all phases of
automobile accidents that occur
in Washtenaw County during the
next year.
Supported by a $23,000 research
grant from the State Legislature,
they plan to investigate the three
"indispensable elements" of any
accident-the driver, the vehicle
and the highway.
According to Prof. John C. Kohl,
director of the University Trans-
portation Institute and supervisor
of the project, the researchers will
visit the scene of significant acci-
dents to gather detailed data on
road and weather conditions at the
time of the mishap.
Then, using questionnaires pre-
pared by University statisticians
and psychologists, they will inter-
view accident victims in an effort
to learn as much as possible about
the driver's pre-accident behavior,
attitudes, mental and emotional
states and his reaction to the high-
way.
"This is apioneer study in which
we are trying to find the real cause
of most traffic accidents," Prof.
Kohl commented. "Generally the
driver is blamed and road and
vehicle conditions are more or less
ignored.
"We hope to be able to gain a'
basis for constructive suggestions
as to how accidents may be pre-
vented in the future, or to point
the way to those phases which
warrent further study," he said.
Bruce D. Greenshields, former
chief of the highway systems

branch of the army's office of
transportation, will be in direct
charge of the research.
Author of more than 30 articles
on traffic engineering and high-
way safety, Greenfields has 29
years of teaching and research
experience in the field.
Subscribe
to The
Michigan Daily

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
ROOMS FOR RENT
FURNISHED 3-room apartment, 1st
floor basement study. Utilities -fur-
nished. Accommodates 3 or 4. Cali
1223 S. State Street. Available now, to
Sept. 15. Dial, 3YP Ypsilanti 3615XM.
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
for two. Call NO 8-7230. )C,
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR TWO
$65.00 per month. Five minute drive
from campus. Phone NO 3-84-60. )C
BOARD
DO YOU need a place to eat this sum-
mer? We feature meals Monday thru
Friday. New cook. Alpha Chi Alpha
1319 Cambridge. Call NO 2-8312, and
ask for house manager. 8
ATTRACTIVE COUNTRY SETTING
Two-room, furnished apartment. Sep-
arate entrance, private bath. Students
preferred. NO 5-1364. )S
Hairstyling for the
Whole Family!!
- 11 STYLISTS
* AIR-CONDITIONED
* LATEST STYLES
The Daseola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theater
S j

FOR SALE
1950 MERCURY-2-door, $350. Leaving
country, must sell!! NO-3-5983. )B
-FOR BALE-Paasche model V airbrush.
Never used, $15. The Paint Pot, 707
Packard. Phone NO 2-0533. )B
SCHWINN BIKE. spdmtr., horn, gener-
ator lights, turn signals, stoplight. 3-
speed. Licensed. $50.00. E. Dutkiewicz.
917 E. Ann. )B
BOY'S ENGLISH BIKE, practically new
and in excellent condition. Call Bar-
bara, Rm. 5045 Alice Lloyd. )B
ARMSTRONG BIKE, cheap, good condi-
tion. 1135 Michigan Ave.)B
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020.)
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOMS AND/OR BOARD available for
summer session and fall. Nelson In-
ternational house, 915 Oakland. NO
3-8506. )E

SHOE

SALE

.000000001
--L.W Ar-OMIV
m

Summer-Spring Shoes

I

675 PAIRS
DRESS, CASUAL, FLATS .
Whites and Combinations-all the
newest colors
ALL SIZES available
but not in every style.
JACQUELINE
SHOES
Values to $12.95 . .
A NOW

WANTED TO BUY
WOULD LIKE TO BUY - girl's and
boy's lightweight bicycle. Inexpen-
sive. NO-2-5704 after six. )K
PERSONAL
DESIRES RIDE to Flint after 3:00 P.M.
Fridays, will pay - Contact Eleanor
Wentzel, 108 Fletcher Hall. )F
SPECIAL FOR SUMMER STUDENTS:
Time $3 (reg. . .6), Life $4 (reg. $6.75),
etc. Student Periodical NO 2-3061.
USED CARS
53 VOLKSWAGEN, Czean, custom seat
covers. Phone NO 8-8771 after 6 P.M.

Read
Daily

Class iedis

*FIIEIISir

U U

SEMI-ANNUAL

i.
i

$790

Dial NO 2-2513

er/action in Itodern C-001in
Shows from 1 :00
-ENNDING TODAY -
THE WONDER SHOW!
tANCASTE
LANCASTER CURTIS
GINA
% LOLLBGID
CINemMScOPE Color by D Lux.
Released thru United Artists
Thursday
"ANIMAL WORLD"
"GOODBYE MY LADY"

I

'A

CONN
+c Iu I

Values to $

lIE
DES$ 90
NOW5

Ran ia/A '

I

9 to 5:30 Daily and Monday nite

306 S. State

"'

THE SALINE MILL
THEATRE
U.S. 112 Saline
Now Thru July 8
Blithe Spirit
Adm. weeknights
$1.65-
Saturdays: $2.20
Season tickets on sale
at reduced rates--
Bob Marshall's or
Phone Saline 31
-- Next Week: -
"THE MOON IS BLUE"
Dial NO 2-3136
NOW SHOWING!
EXCITEMENT!
SUSPENSE!
"" L T JSNEY

THE MUSIC CENTER INC.

Jobs Found
Aid to Students
Job experience gained by pupils
still in high school adds greatly to
their poise, confidence, ability to
get along with people and to the
development of wholesome job
attitudes, Prof. Frank W. Lanham
observes.
Lecturer in the education school,
Prof. Lanham studied students
who participated in a cooperative
business occupations program at
Midland High School and drew
several conclusions favoring con-
tinuation and expansion of such
programs in other high schools.
"From the opinions and indica-
tions of attitudes about the ex-
periences w h i c h we learned
through questionnaires and inter-
views, Prof. Lanham commented,
"it is clear that cooperative busi-
ness education effectively meets
important growth ad development
needs of most pupils enrolled".
Pointing out that the job labora-
tory provides experiences that,
can't be duplicated in the class-
room, Prof. Lanham adds that;
thee participating pupil's scholas-
tic achievements were not adver-
sely affected by taking time out

has a terrific selection of
Battery, Electric and Iransitor Radios.

PHILCO *

R.C.A. * ZENITH * CAPEHART

Chilean Scientist
Tours University
Edmundo Thomas, director of
the Institute of Testing and In-
vestigation of Materials of the
University of Chile and a member
of the Chilean Atomic Energy
Committee, will be at the Uni-
versity through tomorrow.
Brought to this country by the
International Cooperation Admin-
istration to study the organization
and administration of scientific
and technological p r og ra ms,
Thomas arrived on campus Tues-
day.
He will observe the Soil Mech-
anics Program of the engineering
college and other research pro-
grams. His visit will also include
a tour of the campus and of the
Phoenix Memorial Laboratory.

EMERSON * TELEFUNKEN * REGENCY RAYTHEON GE
Priced from $18.00
THE MUSIC CENTER . 300 South Thay..r

Phone NO 2-2500 or NO 8-7200

Just West of Hill Auditorium

I

TONIGHT AT 8
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
BOLTON'S SUSPENSE DRAMA
"ANASTASIA"

TWIN

SERVICE ...

I

for a Job.

.

Are You Eligible? ?

I

$1.50 - $1.10 -75c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
HENRY H.
STVESInc.
LN DISTANCE ~>~

. . . . . . . . . .

Time
Work
Worry

Save

I

- - -

"One call
does it all"

its

DANCING
Tues., Fri. and Sat. Nights

TERRIFIC!

I/

4mU

[I

I'll

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