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August 09, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-09

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&Y, AUGUST 9, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACF TMar==

SA f2 Anx m -.

i

Yankees Overwhelm
Mantle Hits 38th Homer Newt ae of Doubleheader

Sern tors,

12-2

C LASS I FIES

.,

0By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Mickey Mantle
and his homer-hitting mates
powered the New York Yankees'
back on a winning track last night
as the American League leaders
overwhelmed Washington, 12-2.
Mantle slammed his 38th home
run of the season to establish a
personal record and shoot him
nine, games ahead of the pace
Babe, Ruth set in blasting 60 over
the fences in 1927.
Braves 10, Cards 1
) MILWAUKEE-Bob Trowbridge
hurled six-hit ball yesterday and
Joe Adcock hit two homers to lead
t the Milwaukee Braves to a 10-1
victory over the St. Louis Cardinals
in the first game of a twi-night
doubleheader.
Johnny Logan and Del Crandall
, also homered for the Braves, their
10th and 12th respectively, and
Henry Aaron, the league's lead-
ing batter,, stretched his consecu-
tive game hitting streak to 25-
best in the circuit.
SECOND GAME SCORE
Cards 3, Braves 2 (10 innings)
}0

He also spiked himself in falling
to the ground and four stitches
were required to close the wound.
Phls 8, Giants 3
NEW YORK - Robin Roberts
pitched the Philadelphia Phillies
to his fourth win in 10 days yes-
terday, 8-3, despite 10 New York
Giant hits,
Ted Kazanski smashed an in-
side-the-park grand slam homer
and Stan Lopata and Willie Jones
also homered off loser Jim Hearn.
Kazanski drove in five runs and
Jones scored four times.
White Sox 7, Indians 6
C H I C A G O-Sherman Lollar
smashed his eighth homer of the
season into the left field upper
deck with one out in the last of
the 14th inning last night, giving
the Chicago White Sox a 7-6 vic-
tory over the Cleveland Indians.
Boston 7, Baltimore 2
BOSTON-A spitless Tred Wil-
liams-once again wielding the bat
with which he has made baseball
history-belted a decisive home
run and a single last night for
Boston's 7-2 , victory over Balti-
more.
Mickey Vernon followed Wil-
liams' sixth inning bases-empty
drive with a three-run homer in
the eighth that sealed the Orioles'
fate and spelled lefty Mel Parnell's
sixth pitching triumph.

FRANK THOMAS
- - homer helps top Dodgers

SENIORS TO PLAY:
Ineligibiity
Eased at PC
PORTLAND, Ore. A)-The Pa-
cific Coast Conference yesterday
eased the ineligibility penalties
against football players at UCLA
and Southern California by an-
nouncing that seniors affected will
be permitted to play in five con-
secutive games in 1956,
The President's Council fol-
lowed this with a stern warning
that any institution on probation
which fails to clean house before
next May "shall be expelled from
the conference as of Aug. 1, 1957.,"
Four schools are on probation-
-UCLA for three years. Washing-
ton and USC for two and Califor-
nia for one year.
Three Penalty Changes
Dr. Glenn Seaborg, conference
spokesman, revealed that the self-
examination reports brought pen-
alty changes to only three schools.
Washington told the conference
it had obtained the names of four
football players who received sub-
stantial financial aid not sanc-
tioned by the PCC code, and de-
clared the quartet totally ineli-
gible.
The conference said the penalty
was too harsh and modified it
to one year of lost eligibility for
each 'student. They were not
named, but it was disclosed that
freshmen and varsity men were
affected.

AMEIajor League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

I

New York
Cleveland
Boston
Chicago
Detroit
Baltimore
Washington
Kansas City

W L Pct
69 37 .651
60 44 .557
60 45 .571
54 48 .529
50 56 .472
47 58 .448
43 62 .410
36 69 .343

GB
8
812
13
19
211/
25Y2
321/2

MICKEY MANTLE
... tops own mark anyway
Tigers 8, A's 7
DETROIT-Detroit came from
behind yesterday afternoon with
a two-run rally in the sixth in-
ning and went on to defeat the
Kansas City Athletics, 8-7.
Al Kaline and Frank House hit
home runs for Detroit, while rookie
outfielder Al Pilarcik clouted one
for the A's. Kaline's came with a
mate aboard in the eighth.
* * *
Pirates 8, Dodgers 5
PITTSBURGH - With F r a n k
Thomas belting a three-run homer
to climax a five-run first inning
outburst, the Pittsburgh Pirates
defeated the second-place Brook-
lyn Dodgers, 8-5; last night.
The Dodgers scored three of
their runs in the ninth inning as
they knocked veteran Red Mun-
ger out of the box, but he got
credit for his third victory in five
decisions.
* * *
Redlegs 8, Cubs 2
CINCINNATI-Ted Kluszewski
and Gus Bell hit homers to pace
the Cincinnati Redlegs to a 8-2
win over the Chicago Cubs before
12,945 fans here last night.
The Cubs made six errors.
Gene Baker, Cub's second base-
man, was struck in the left temple
by a pitch by Johnny Klippstein
in the fourth inning. He was hos-
pitalized with a severe laceration.

GENE BAKER
... felled by pitch

Penalties
C Meeting
The conference extended to
Sept. 20 the deadline before which'
UCLA and Washington could sub-
mit evidence showing that no
more than five students in a sport
"other than football had received
illegal financial aid.
If this is done, the probations
against those sports will be re-
moved. The probations at South-
ern California and California did
not include sports other than foot-
ball.
Probe Calls
For Cleanup
Of Fighting
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (P) - A
special investigating committee,
in a sizzling report yesterday
urged a drastic cleanup of Cali-
fornia boxing and wholesale li-
cense revocation against big-name
figures.
The report described boxing asj
gangster-ridden in California. Itj
called wrestling a joke. And it
urged a complete shakeup of state
control of prize fights.
Investigators found 72 different
types of violations in the year-
long study ordered by !Gov. Good-
win J. Kngiht. These included
fight fixing, cheating of boxers,
underworld infiltration an dillegal
manager-promoter combinations.
The committee recommended
strong one-man rule of boxing in
place of the present unsalaried
five-man commission. It urged
strict controls on all licenses.

FOR SALE
GIBSON L-5 GUITAR, Concert Model,
No pickup. Ben Alexander, 26 Wen-
TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE. 1952 Tun-
derbird. Excellent condition $375.
Call NO 3-1408.
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. 'ery good
condition, $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults'
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-1
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
GRADUATE STUDENT wishes to share
apartment with one or two men.
$45 each. Call Myron Bramnstein,
7-10 P.M. NO 2-4401, ext. Michigan
309. D
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156. )S5
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED TYPIST in disserta-
tion, term papers, etc. All work done
on electric typewriter. Ph. NO. 2-7605.
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
aratelyi Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020, )
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registred.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J

SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants per-
muanent night janitor or night watch-
man work, Reliable .NO-1-9020. )S
USED CARS
DODGE 19,60 excellent condition, ra-
dio, heater, engine completely over-
hauled, new brakes--must sell. Call
Michigan Union (dining hail) NO
2-4431 between 6:00 & 8:00 p.m. Ask
for Peter Schlitt. 1N
1952 CIEV. CLUB COUPE, good condi-
tion. Heater. $400.00. Walter, NO 3-
3307. 1i
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer. Call NO
3-8460.
HELP WANTED
TECHNICAL TRANSLATORS needed
periodtcally. Leave your name and
qualifications and you will be con-
tacted when needed. Finnish trans-
lator needed now. Teclinical Library
Research Service Mrs. Lotze. NO 2-
1871 H
PERSONAL
WANTED--Undergraduate or Graduate
woman to share relatively inexpen-
sive, nice four room apt. Ph. NO 3-
5974 and ask for Rae. ),
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
4-ROOM FURNISHED apartment, two
bedrooms and bath. 1223 S. State.
Available now. Accommodates four
adults. No drinking. Utilities, garage.
Dial 3YP Ypsilanti 3-615xm. )s
U--
6588 Jackson Rd.
Last Time Tonight
William Holden Kim Novak
"PICNIC"
also
"KILLER'S KISS"

OLYMPIC SWIM TRIALS:

Yorzyk Sets New World's Record

TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Washington
Baltimore at Boston
Cleveland at Chicago
Kansas City at Detroit
NATIONAL LEAGUE

*Milwaukee
Brooklyi i
Cincinnati
Philadelphia
*St. Louis
t Pittsburgh
Chicago
New York

w
62
61
61
Si
51
45
43
36

L Pct GB
39 .614 -)
43 .587 21/z
44 .581 3
52 .495 12
52 .495 12
58 .437 18
59 .422 19Yx
63 .364 25

*Last night's second game not included.
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Milwaukee (2 twi-night)
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh
Philadelphia at New York
Chicago. at Cincinnati

Williams Clouts Home Run
In First Game Since Fine

DETROIT ()-Bill Yorzyk, 23-
year-old New England pre-medical
student, won the men's 200-meter
butterfly in the world's record
shattering time of two minutes
19 seconds flat last night to win a
place on the United States swim-
ming team.
The' Northampton, Mass., stu-
dent clipped 3.2 seconds off the
mark he had set in preliminary
trials in the afternoon. Previous-
ly the fastest time for the event
over a long course was 2.23.8.
Greater Achievement
Yorzyk's amazing time was de-
clared by officials, as an even
greater achievement than his
world's record of 2:16.7 for the
200-meter butterfly over the 25-
meter short course. Last night's
event was raced on the Olympic
50-meter course.
Earlier, Pat McCormick, reign-
ing queen of the divers, won the
three-meter springboard trials
and qualified for the Olympic
team along with Barbara Gilders
and Jeanne Stunyo, two pretty
Detroit girls.
jIhe 26-year-old Mrs. McCor-
mick of Los Angeles, double Olym-
pic gold medalist and winner of 27

national championships, held her
supremacy by winning the trials
at Brennan pools with a total of
464.1 points.
Miss Gilders, 19, won second
place with 457.3 points, followed
by Miss Stunyo, 20-year-old Uni-
versity of Detroit student, with
427.4

Oyakawa led 30 qualifiers in the
100-meter backstroke.
Oyakawa had a clocking of
1:04.7 in the 100-meter back-
stroke, which bettered his own
Olypic mark of 1:05.4.
In the backstroke event, Frank
McKinney, a 17-year-old Indian-
apolis lad, was second to Oya-
kawa's best time with 1:05.7.

4CinemaL qVild.
Thursday and Friday
at 7 and 9

h

I

I

BOSTON (A)-Boston's tempes-
tuous Ted Williams unleashed his
pent-up emotions in a tremen-
dous home run last night againsi
Baltimore in his first appearance
since the spitting episode which
cost him the heaviest fine in major
league history.
As Williams neared the dugout
after his 13th homer of the sea-
son, he clasped a hand over his
mouth as if to avoid the possibility
of another spitting incident.
The bases empty blow gave the
Red Sox a 3-2 lead in the sixth
inning.
Remorseless Williams had drawn
loud acclaim from a near-capacity
crowd at Fenway Park at the out-
set.
When the Boston Red Sox slug-
ger's name was announced in the
starting lineup over the public ad-
dress system a shouting ovation
followed. Earlier in the day some
of the fans had begun fund drives
to help Williams pay his $5,000
penalty.
A faint trace of the boos which
had sent Williams on the most
Fans Ignore
~All-Stir Line
CHICAGO UP)-The old football
saying that the line does all the
.work and the backs get all the
glory probably will be true again
in tomorrow night's 23rd annual
All-Star game at Soldier Field.
For the most part, fans who jam
the huge bowl on Chicago's lake
front and those witnessing the
game on television will have all
.eyes for heralded ball-carriers and
rasers as they toil against the
..avored Cleveland Browns.
It won't take them long to single
out the number 40 to be worn by
All-America Howie "Hopalong"
Cassady of Ohio State, or the num-
ber 21 of Michigan State's Earl
Morrall, who probably will be the
starting All-Star quarterback.
The TV camera also may focus
on the likes of Notre Dame's crack
fullback, Don Schaefer (72), Okla-
homa's Bob Burris (63), Southern
Methodist's Don McTlhennv (35).

recent of his saliva attacks Tues-
day were muffled last night by
his reception from the majority
of the crowd.
SEarlier in the day, Williams had
said he wasn't at all sorry for
spitting at the fans in Tuesday's
game against the New York
Yankees.

p

The Intruder Gains Surprise
Victory in Hambletonian Race

GOSHEN, N. Y. (A)-The In-
truder, who was unable to race
last year because of illness, scored
a surprise victory over 19 other
classy three-year-old trotters yes-
terday in the $100,603.99 Hamble-
tonian Stakes at Good Time Park.
It required three heats to decide
the world famous sulky derby. The
favored Egyptian Princess suf-
fered a hoof injury in the rough
first dash of one mile around the
triangular course.
The Intruder, owned by the All-
wood Stable of Leonard J. Buck
at Far Hills, N. J., finished
eleventh in the first dash won by
Mrs. Dave R. Johnston's Valiant
Rodney, from Charlotte, N. C.
But when the chips were down,
the Jersey colt had the old bounce
that brought him first money of
$59,155.15 -- second richest purse
to the winner sinces the race was
inaugurated in 1926.
Ned Bowler, who drove in his
first Hambletonian also helped
himself to an early birthday pres-
ent by whipping The Intruder to
victory in the second and third
heats. Bower, a native of Ravena,
Ohio, is 33 today.
Seven years ago Bower was a
$175 per month groom, but last
night he was the toast of the
trotting and this ancient Orange

County village in the foothills of
the sleepy Catskill Mountains.
Egyptian Princess got into a
jam in the first heat and broke
stride. In the jumble of horses,
she suffered a cut on her right
forefoot ,and was lucky to get
back alive in 1th place.
Golfers Seek
Tam's 'Prizes
CHICAGO (P-) - Golf's great-
est get-rich-qick scheme - the
$116,200 Tam O'Shanter "World"
Championships - starts today
with the tournament-wise pros
predicting that a 278 will win it
come Sunday.
This figure represents 10-under-
par for the 72-hole distance over
Tam's 6,915 yards.
The winning loot in the men's
pro division is $50,000 plus a con-
tract optional for 56 exhbiitions at
$1,000 each. Julius Boros, who won
the extravaganza last year with
281, collected the full $106,000 and
still had time to play in several
big tournaments, including the
National Open.
The prize list scales down to
$10,000 for second place, $5,000
for third, $3,000 for fourth and
to $100 for 61st through 67th posi-
tions.
The swag for 23 women pros
totals $15,000 with a winner's slice
of $6,000.
In addition to the men and
women pros, there are fields of

I

National League
Suspends Riganey
NEW YORK (I)-Bill Rigney,
m . A Proffh .WurVnrL- .+

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