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August 08, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDI 'ESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1956

E CHIGAN DAILY

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Raar StemReachesHalfAr GlOe

By BEM PRICE
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The United States slowly is
building an electronic defense
against surprise attack that when
completed will stretch almost half
way arouind the globe.
Its components, as the accom-
panying map shows, include radar
stations on land, stationary sea
outposts like the "Texas Tower"'
off Cape Cod, patrolling airplanes
and ships, and even submarines.
The vast Arctic wastes stretch-
ing from Point Barrow, Alaska,
clear across the continent+ to
Greenland now contain a series
of secret radar stations to detect
the approach of possibly hostile
planes - or guided missiles.
Radar in Alaska
Where the North American con-
tinent almost meets Asia at the
Bering Strait, there is a chain of
stations extending from Point
Barrow southward. Out in the far
flung Aleutian Islands other sta-
tions are being built.
Radar stations also stand in
northern Japan and down to the
island bastion of Okinawa, keep-
Sing a watchful beam trained on
the coasts of China.
Daily a small fleet of destroyer
escort vessels and eight converted
cargo ships, loaded with electron-
le gear, ply northern waters be-
tween Canada and Iceland and
between Alaska and Japan. There
are radar equipped submarines
in the system, but where they op-
erate is secret.
Planes Patrol Skies
In addition, wide ranging planes
- each packed with six tons of
radar equipment and a dozen
scopes - patrol the skies far out
from the United States and into
the far north.
These planes, flying at 10,000
feet, can search more than 45,000
square miles of surface and track
several different groups of friend-
ly and enemy aircraft simultane-
ously.
The Navy calls these four-
engine radar planes the WV2.
They could, of course, fly much
higher than 10,000 feet and search
far greater areas. The Navy re-
cently placed a 60-million-dollar
order with Lockheed Aircraft
Corp., for additional WV2s.
Off Cape Cod, near Boston,
stands the first "Texas tower," a
platform on stilts in the ocean.
It likewise is a part of the radar
warning line. Two more are
planned to cover the area between
Cape Cod and Long Island, N. Y.
Besides these screens, there are

"

stations in the Caribbean which
guard the southern approaches.
The system is designed to give
the United States four to five
hours' warning of the approach of
hostile aircraft.
.With the development of guided
missiles and 1,500-mile-per hour
aircraft, the warning time is being

cut steadily. Even so, just a few
minutes warning would allow the
United States to begin counter-
measures.
When completed, the continen-
tal line alone will stretch some
4,500 to 5,000 miles across the
north from the Aleutians to
Greenland.

U.S. ]Dialect
Map Devised
By Linguists
Ever get into an argument over
the proper way to pronounce
soot" or "route"?
It all depends on where you are,
and the argument can be settled
by referring to a linguistic atlas,
a compilation of dialect maps cov-
ering the entire United States now
being prepared at the University.
You might have to wait a while,
however, for only the maps for
New England have been published
so far, although the materials
have been collected for the Middle
Atlantic States, the South Atlantic
States, the North Central and the
Upper Midwest States.
25 Year Study
Differences in pronunciation,
gramar and vocabulary have been
gathered by interviewers for the'
last 25 years. After a community
has been selected as representative
of the early settlement in a ter-
ritory, an elderly individual is se-
lected as representative of the
community.
The interviewer engages him in
conversation about things ordin-
ary in his everyday life. Never
during the eight hours or so it
takes to ask his some 550 ques-
tions is there any hint at what
the interviewer is really after--
the man's speech habits.
"People are sensitive about
their language," says Prof. Albert
H. Marckwardt of the Department
of English, director of the Ameri-
can Dialect Study in the North
Central States, which include
Michigan,
UseiIndirect Questioning
"If you ask a man what he calls
a pail, he'll say, 'I call it a pail
just like everyone else' And ten
minutes later he'll call it a buck-
et." So, he explains, the inter-
viewers stick to indirect ques-
tioning.
A middle-aged person in the
same community is also inter-
viewed. The results obtained from
him are found as the second of
two strange-looking wordsondthe
dialect map for that area. The
first is the language habit of the
older person. If there is a third,
it is that of a younger person.
Prof. Marckwardt reports there
are more dfiferences among the
older persons, as the younger sub-
jects tend to be more educated
and cosmopolitan.
Maps in Phonetic Symbols
Reading one of these dialect
maps may be difficult for the un-
initiated layman before he learns
the meanings of phonetic symbols
for the words on the map are in
phonetic transcription. There are
separate maps for each word
known to differ regionally.
Such an atlas is primarily of in-
terest to historians and students
of language and folklore, al-
though it has also been used as
primary source material in com-
piling a dictionary.
Prof. Marckwardt believes there
is more information in it than is
actually used. Psychologists and
English teachers would find it
valuable, he thinks,

research, public hearings, or other'
methods.
At present. the Council staff
points out, Michigan's "65 and
over" population totals approxi-
mately 540,000. By 1970, that fig-
ure will probably climb to 723,000,
an increase of better than 1,000'
per month.
Since July 1, the Council has
been housed at the University. Its
executive secretary is Anthony
Lenzer, Ann Arbor. Howard R.
Estes of Pontiac serves as chair-
man and John B. Martin, Jr. of
Grand Rapids as vice-chairman.
Council members include Wilma
Donahue, chairman of the Univer-
sity division of gerontology, Dr.
John V. Fopeano of Kalamazoo,
Richard C. Hedke of Trenton, The
Rev. Charles M. Herbst of Ontona-
gon, and Dr. Alfred Thomas Jr.
and Ernest Wunsch, both of De-
troit.

MICHIGAN STUDY:
Aging Problem Council
To Hold Business Meet
Michigan's Legislative Advisory Council on Problems of the
Aging will hold its first business session at the University today.
Financed by a grant of $12,000 from the State Legislature, the
Council was created to "study and investigate the employment, eco-
nomic, health education, recreation, housing, institutional care and
other needs of aged persons" in Michigan.
At today's meeting, the Council is expected to decide which of
these problems should receive earliest consideration and how each
can best be approached-through,

America'"s Foremost Negro Dancer
in a Colorful Recital of Primitive Rhythms
sTheUniversitf SoMichigan .umier Session
Presents

UAW's Nunn
Raps Senator
DETROIT () - Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Ariz) was accused
yesterday by Guy Nunn, radio di-
rector for the United Auto Work-
ers Union, of "moral cowardice"
in turning down an invitation to
appear on a Union-sponsored
broadcast before the November
election,
The two exchanged sharply
worded letters after Goldwater
said in Washington he would be
too bus yto appear on any UAW
program before the first of the
year.
Nunn had invited Goldwater to
defend what Nunn said were false
charges by the Senator concerning
the Union's political activities.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
USED CARS
DODGE 1950 excellent condition, ra-
dio, heater, engine completely over-
hauled, new brakes-must sell. Cali
Michigan Union (dining bal) NO
2-4431 between 6:00 & 8:00 p.m. Ask
for Peter Schlitt. )N
1952 CHEV. CLUB COUPE, good condi-
tion. Heater, $400.00. Walter, NO 3-
3307. )N
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer. Call NO
3-8460. )X
PERSONAL
WANTED-Undergraduate or Graduate
woman to share relatively inexpen-
sive, nice four room apt. Ph. NO 3-
5974 and ask for Rae. )F
WANTED-riders to Maine via New York
Thruway, about Aug. 17, Phone NO
8-8457, )F

FOR SALE
GIBSQN L-5 GUITAR. Concert Model.
No pickup. Ben Alexander, 26 Wen-
ley vW', Q, 3-
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020, )
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594,.)D
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED TYPIST in disserta-
tion, term papers, etc. All work don
on electric typewriter. Ph. NO. 2-7605.
)J
TYPING -- Theses, term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
So. Main. NO. 8-7590.
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep.
arately Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. ) J
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
4-ROOM FURNISHED apartment, two
bedrooms and bath, 1223 S. State.
Available now. Accomodates four
adults. No drinking, Utilites, garage.
Dial 3YP Ypsilanti 3-615xm. )$

I CLASSIFIEDS

TUNISIA MEETING:
Former .Daily Editor
A ttends Conference
(Continued from Page T)
because the European nations are small enough so that they are
blanketed by national newspapers appearing in the capital city,
In France, for example, it is impossible to publish any newspaper
more frequently than monthly; in Austria, one is fortunate to come
out with three issues a year.
Require Official Viewpoint
Also, in the majority of cases European student journalists are
official organs of the student governments; as such, they are required

ON STAGE!

IN PERSON!

~eaF pRIMUS
Exciting . . . Stunning . . . Brilliant"
-JOHN MARTIN, N.Y. Times
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9-8:30 P.M.
Tickets: Main Floor $1.50, Balcony $1.00
All Seats Reserved - Box Office Open Daily 10-5; Thursday 10-8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM

L -

|I

y

Falling Stars
To Brighten
August Skies
:"Shooting stars" will flash
across the August skies at a high-
er rate than at any other time of
the year, according to University
astronomer, Prof. Hazel M. Losh.
This is the yearly show of the
Perseid Meteors. Although visible
for two or three weeks, they will
reach their peak around August
10 and 11, with about 70 meteors
an hour being visible after mid-
night . with good sky conditions,
Prof. Losh said.
Although these streaks of light
may be seen in any direction, their
paths, when traced back, will ap-
pear to intersect in the northeast
whei'e the constellation, Perseus,
will be rising around 10 p.m. This
accounts for the name given to
the annual display.
These bits of iron and stone be-
come visible only when they en-
ter the Earth's atmosphere. "Com-
ing in at terrific speeds," Prof.
Losh continued, "they are checked
and the resulting friction sets
them burning." However, most
of them are consumed in their
plunge.
Among the bright planets of
interest this month will be Saturn
in the southwestern sky. It will
set around midnight.

4to present the official viewpoint
of the student government,.
The draft declaraton of rights
of the student press set forth six
points as essential to the function-
ing of a free and responsible stu-
dent press :
1) freedom from government
regulations
2) freedom from university reg-
ulation
3) freedom from student gov-
ernment regulation
4) freedom from editorial con-
trol by financial or other outside
pressures.
5) freedom to express all points
of view
6) free access to information.
Suggest Student Press Bureau
The international student press
bureau was suggested for estab-
lishment at Leiden, Netherlands,
at the offices of the Coordinating
Secretariat of National Unions of
Students, the continuing adminis-
trative agency of the annual Inter-
national Student Conference, an
assemblage of 53 National Unions
of Students from all parts of the
world.
Its initial functions were envis-
aged as issuing an international
student press card, a study of the
structure and functions of student
press, radio, and television activity.
The Student Mirror, a bi-weekly
international student press service
published in Berlin and circulating
to about 1500 student newspapers
around the world, came up for its
annual review. It was started at
the request of the First Interna-
tional Student Press Conference.

Nothing takes to the road like a Chevy!

Once in a blue moon a car like this
comes along-a design so advanced
in performance, so beautifully bal-
anced that it stands out above
every other car on the highway.
It has a solid, sure-footed way of
going that makes driving safer
and more pleasant on any road.
And you feel a very special sense
of security in its rapid-fire respon-

siveness to your touch on the wheel,
brakes and accelerator,
You can see that the '56 Chevy,is
a standout for style. But until you
have driven one you're missing the
best part of the news - the fact
that Chevrolet is the smoothest,
solidest, most wedded-to-the-road
automobile you ever bossed. Try it
and see.

America's largest selling car-
2 million more owners than any.
other makel

You get more car when you buy it . .. more dollars when you sell it! Chevy has the highest resale value of the leading low-priced modelk!

IsmopmoRmopm"

Aiw
-,qw A 7 7

r e-Jctc m in.lod~ern Gooifta

4/if(

DIAL 2-2513
ENDING TONIGHT
GEORGE GOBEL*Mf'TZI WW~
DAVIDMV.I
Shown at 7:00 and 9:40
* PLUS *
Paramount presents
- ,*+_ .

.

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stamrng
PAUL DOUGLAS JOHN DEREK
JODY LAWRANCE+CESAR ROMERO
Shown at 8:30 Only
NOTE
Daily Matinees
Resume Thursday
Continuous from 1 P.M.
DIAL 2-3136

t

The "Two-Ten" Sport Coape with Body by Fisher-one of 20 Cheyrolet beaeties.

Only franchied Chevrolet dealers 0

display this famous trademark

See

Your Authorized Chevrolet Dealer

"

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