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July 13, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MTC ~IGAN DAILY'AI! T

'PAGE TI

NL

Nets

6

-5

All-Star

Vi tory

TIrAbELRHlEE

CONLEY CREDITED WITH WIN:
Musial's Homerun in 12th Tops Rally
4 J

IBerra Berates, Musial
MV1uses in Retrospections
U>

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phon e NO 2-3241

II

BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-Fl

MILWAUKEE (R)) - Stan "The
Man" Musial of the St. Louis
Cardinals lined a 375-foot home
run into the right field bleachers
on the first pitch of the bottom
half of the 12th inning yesterday
to give the National League a
6-5 comeback victory over the
American in the 22nd All-Star
game.
Musial's smash set an All-Star
record for it was his fourth in 12
games, the most ever played by
any man since the late Arch Ward
dreamed up the series back in
1933. Until he broke up the ball
game, Musial hadn't had a hit.
Nationals Rally
Trailing 5-0 as late as the seven-
th inning, the Nationals clawed
back to win after they had been
" counted out. Mickey Mantle's tre-
mendous 425-foot blast into "Peri-
ni's Woods" in center field with
two men on climaxed a four-run
spurt by the Americans in the
first inning.
Sensational clutch pitching by
Cincinnati's Joe Nuxhall and Mil-
waukee's Gene Conley, the ulti-
mate winner, stifled the Americans
while the Nationals closed the
series gap to 13-9 in favor of the
American.,
Musial's winning blow provided
a smashing climax to Milwaukee's
first taste of All-Star play.
Conley Garners Win
Conley, the towering 6-8 right-
hander who has won 11 games for
the home town Braves, had just
taken up the pitching burden in
the 12th inning.
At the end of the second extra
inning game in the series history,

Box Score

AMERICAN A,
Kuenn, ss .........3
Carrasquel, ss ......3
Fox, 26 ............3
Avila, 2b ............1
illiams, If ........3
Smith, If .... ....1
Mantle, f -...... 6
Berra, c ....... .6
Kaline, rf ...........4
Vernon, lb .......s.5
Finigan, 3b ........3
Rosen, 3b ........2
Pierce, p..........0
b Jensen ...........1
Wnp ...... .0
g Power ............1
Ford, P-...........1
Sullivan, p.........1
Totals ...........44

manager Leo Durocher had used
everybody in his 25-man squad
except Luis Arroyo, the St. Louis
lefty. He had to let pitchers bat
for themselves in the late stages.
Conley Struck Out Side
Conley, who had worked a full
nine-inning game Sunday, simply
threw the ball past the opposition
in his one-inning stand. Detroit's
Al Kaline, y Washington's Mickey
Vernon and Cleveland's Al Rosen
all struck out.
After that bit of inspirational
work, Musial stepped to the plate
to face Boston's Frank Sullivan,
the fourth American League pitch-
er. One pitch, one home run. It
was as simple as that.
Errors Prove Costly
A costly error by Chicago's Chico
Carrasquel who fumbled a ground-
er and then threw away the ball,
trying for a force play, cost the
Americans a run in the seventh.
Another error, by Rosen, who let
Kaline's throw get through him at
third base, permitted the Cubs'
Ransom Jackson to score the tying
run in the eighth. In each case
there were two out before the
Nationals scored.
Terrific Clout by Mantle
Mantle's 425-foot homer with
two men on base in the first
inning looked like the ball game
until the Natinals came out of
their daze. Mickey's screaming hit'
cleared a double fence and rolled
toward the cluster of trees, planted
by Milwaukee owner Lou Perini to
give the hitters a better back-
ground.
One run already had scored on
a wild pitch by Philadelphia's Rob-
in Roberts before the New York
Yankee centerfielder connected to
complete a four-run innlg.
AL Garners Fifth Run
The American lead was stretched
to 5-0 in the sixth on a combina-
tion of a single by Yanke.e Yogi
Berra, a double by Kaline and an
infield out by Mickey Vernon of
Washington.
The double by Kaline was a hot
smash off the left wrist of Eddie
Mathews, Milwaukee third base-
man, that bounced into left field.
Mathews left the game in the next
inning for a trip to the hospital
where X-rays of the wrist showed
he had escaped a fracture.
Billy, Pierce, the slick Chicago
lefty, gave up only one hit, a
lead-off single by St. Louis' Red
Schoendienst, in the first three
innings. He faced only nine men
because Schoendienst was caught
trying to advance on a ball that
got away from Berra.
Mays Starts Rally
Willie Mays, the hotshot of the
1954 world champion New York
Giants, started the National rally
off with a single in the seventh.
The next two men flied out be-
fore Hank Aaron, of Milwaukee
walked.
Johnny Logan, another Milwau-
kee Brave, finally broke the Amer-
ican's shutout bid with a single,
scoring Mays. When Carrasque
fumbled a ground ball by pinch
hitter Stan Lopata of the Phillies
and then threw wild trying to force
I-M SOFTBALL SCORES
Phi Chi 14, Phi Rho Sigma 11
Hard Rocks 10, Phi Delta Phi 5
Triangle 17, BDA 9
Metallurgy 15, Hayden 2
Greene 18, Cooley House 11
Hinsdale defeated Strauss (for-
feit)

Logan at second, Aaron also scor-
ed.
Three in the eighth tied the
score for the Nationals with the
help of four hits and another er-
ror, this time by Rosen.
Kaline Misplays 'Big Klu'
Once again there were two out
before things started to pop. Mays
singled to right and Kluszewski
singled to the same field. Right
fielder Kaline, fearing a homer,
was playing deep, and wasn't able
to reach Klu's hit that fell at his
feet. Jackson grounded a single to
right, scoring Mays with his second
run.
Whitey Ford, the Yankee left-
hander who took over from Wynn
in the seventh with a 5-0 lead,
was replaced by Sullivan at that
point with the score 5-3, two on
and two out. Aaron came through
with his second hit, also to right,
driving in the big Cincy first base-
man.
When Kaline's jhrow to third,
trying for Jackson, got away from
Rosen and rolled to the stands,
Jackson also pounded home with
the tying run. Only a brilliant play
by Carrasquel on Logan's smash
prevented further trouble.

MILWAUKEE (A')-It was a bit-
ter and disgusted bunch of play-
ers in the American League All-
Stars' clubhouse but the bitterest
was Yogi Berra and the most dis-
gusted was Whitey Ford, his
pitching mate of the New York
Yankees.
Most of the athletes were hur-
riedly getting into their street
clothes, anxious to get out of
there and board trains or planes
for points elsewhere.
Berra, however, was stomping
around in front of his locker,
muttering under his breath. Ford,
who was whacked in the 6-5, 12-
iniing loss to the Nationals, sat
disconsolately on his stool, for
the most part looking into space.
"They're supposed to be power
hitters," grumbled Berra to no-
body in particular. "I didn't see
any power. All I saw was bloops.
Yah, that's what those guys are
-a bunch of bloop hitters. They
only got one extra base hit-Klu's
double-until Musial hit that ho-
mer. We gave them the game."
Ford, who yielded the first five
runs to the Nationals in 1% in-
nings of pitching, was the most
unconsolable.

R
1
0
1
0
0
I
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.
0
0
0
5

HT
1
2
1
0
1
0
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
18

MILWAUKEE (P)-"The right
man did it!"
That was the exclamation of
National League president War-
ren Giles as he thumped Stan
Musial on the back for his 12th
inning homer which broke up the
All-Star game.
It also voiced the sentiment of
the entire whooping National
League dressing room in which
Musial completely stole the spot-
light.
A jubilant Lippy Durocher,
manager of the victorious Na-
tionals, joked that he ordered
Musial to hit the decisive homer
because he had nearly exhausted
his bench.
One NL Reserve Left
Only pitcher Luis Arroyo of the
St. Louis Cardinals was left for
service when Musial stroked his
homer. off Frank Sullivan's first
pitch in the 12th.
Musial accepted wholesale con-
gratulations in a modest fashion,
explaining that he was swinging
"just to get on" in the 12th.
"Before that," said Musial, who
entered the game as a reserve in
the fourth inning, "I was really
swinging for the fences. I didn't
take a vicious cut at Sullivan's
pitch in the 12th. It was a fast
ball, letter high. But when I con-
nected, I knew it was over the
fence."
Durocher Nearly Speechless
Durocher, momentarily, was left
speechless after his triumphant
squad swarmed into the National
dressing room.
"It was a wonderful thing, as
good a game as you'd want to see."
Then the Lip began warming up
oratorically.
"I have had 'four All-Star
squads," said Durocher, "and this
one really was something. They
were like a bunch of college kids
on the bench. When we went four
runs, then five down, it didn't
squelch them a bit. They kept up
bench chatter like a football
team."
Durocher had high praise for
lanky Gene Conley, the Milwaukee
Braves pitcher, who struck out
the American League side in the
12th and was credited with the
victory.
ForyConley, It was a goat to
hero All-Star role in two years.
Last year, he was charged with
defeat as he pitched a home run
ball to Larry Doby.
Andrews Boxes
Charles Tonite
CHICAGO (R)-Paul Andrews of
Buffalo, N. Y., will yield several
pounds and considerable experi-
ence to Ezzard Charles when the
two meet tonight' in a 10-round
bout at Chicago Stadium.
Andrews, who is rated sixth in
the 175-pound division, has had
only 35 fights and lost 5 of them.
The scrap, which will be tele-
vised nationally at 8 p.m. CST on
ABC, mainly is a test for Andrews'
youth and his knockout-laden
right against a 34-year-old cam-
paigner who has 103 fights under
his belt and held the heavyweight
crown before being dethroned, by
Jersey Joe Walcott in 1951.

LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Esterbrook fountain pen, be-
hind Congregational Church and Betsy
Barbour. Call 3-8146 from 6 to 9. )5A
FOUND-small blue pecil purse con-
taining keys, N. Univ. and Forest, NO
3-15'31, Ext. 253. )4A
PERSONAL
SPECIAL RATES-on TIME magazine,
12 wks. for $1, 26 for $2. Call NO 3-
8146. )F
ABSOLUTELY lowest prices available to
students for Time, Life, Sat. Eve.
Post, etc., from Student Periodical.
NO 2-3061. )3F
FOR SALE
SIAMESE-Seal pointe kittens with pa-
pers. Stud service. Call Peterson's NO
2-9020. )4B
I'M QUITTING photography. Selling 16
magazines Kodachrome 16 mm movie
film $4.75 each or $70 for the lot. Save
$2.20 on one and $41.20 on lot. R. J.
Swanson, 1332 Sheehan. NO 3-5958 aft..
er 5 P.M. )8B
REMINGTON QUIET-RITER-Ideal for
all kinds of typing. Bought four weeks
ago. Very little use. Costs $124. Sells
$95. Student leaving country soon. Call
NO 2-9205 after 7 P.M., or weekdays all
day. )9B
EQUITY IN 40-foot housetrailer. 2-bed-
room, full bath and kitchen; wall-to-
wall carpeting, etc. Must sell before
Sept. 1. Call Yps 5421J. )10B
OFFICE EQUPMENT for eye, ear, nose
and throat doctors, including: chair,
table, instrument cabinet, desk, ther
opeutic machine, instruments, white
gowns, seven (7) volumes of "Opera-
tion and Surgery" by Bickham, fifteen
(15) volumes of the encyclopedia Med-
ical Surgery and Specialty," and other
books. Telephone Ivanhoe 2-9440, Vol-
unteers of America, 3272 River St.,
Lansinc, Michigan. )11B
REMINGTON portable typewriter, lit-
tie used; two autos, $25; set MacGreg-
or irons. Call T. Leithauser, NO 2-6671.
)12B
ROYAL portable typewriter. A-1 condi-
tion. Reasonable. Phone NO 2-5407.
)13B
5x3 DESK, swivel chair, icebox, table.
527 Church, 5 to 7 P.M. only, basement
apartment. )14B
SHORT SLEEVE Skip-Dents sport shirts.
,$1.39, 2 for $2.50. Sanforized, assorted
colors. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)15
HELP WANTED
WANTED-part-time sales clerk; male.
For men's furnishings and shoe store.
Experience preferred. Sam's Store, 122
E. Washington. )8
ROOMS FOR RENT
SUITE ROOM for rent. 2 or 3 male stu-
dents. Cooking privileges. Linen fur-
nished. Half block from campus. $6.00
each. 417 E. Liberty. )14D
ROOMS FOR MEN-singles, doubles, and
dormitory, One block from campus. $7
and $5. Phone NO 2-0293 evenings.
)15D
Schwaben Inn
TAVERN
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
We serve all kinds of Beer,
Wine, Sandwiches. Also all
kinds of amusement machines
for recreation.
We serve beer in'steins and
pitchers. New furniture has
been added.
John Maier, Proprietor.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds.

Components and Service
Audiophile, net prices
TEL EFUNKEN
Hi-Fi, AM-FM shortwave radios
'Service on all makes of
radios and phonographs
Ann Arbor Radio & TV
1217 S. University Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. ) 6J

WASHINGS - and ironings separately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick-up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )2J
BABY SITTER, day or evening. 50c per
hour. NO 2-9020. )8J
USED CARS
1952 CHEVROLET hardtop. Bittersweet
and beige color, radio and heater. One
owner. The big lot across from the
downtown carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )6N
1949 DODGE convertible, radio and
heater, runs perfect. The big lot
across from the downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )5N9
1951 PACKARD. "200" Series. New mo-
tor, new tires, sharp. The big lot
across from the downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )4N
CHEVROLET BEL AIRE-1953 4 door,
Must sell, will sacrifice. Call Don at
NO 2-5614. Leave number if not in.
)lIN
'47 CADILLAC - sedan. Radio, heater,
hydra-matic. Royal Master whitewall
tires. Perfect condition throughout.
You get a better deal at Fitzgerald-
Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit St. NO 8-8141.
)12N

July Money-Savers
Completely Washable
RAYON SLACKS

THE

ECONOMIC
APPROACH
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

TRANSPORTATION
CALIFORNIA? Seeking responsible per-
son or family to drive our Buick to
near L.A. within five weeks. Some pay.
References required. Phone NO 2-
2123, 7 to 9 P.M. )2G
WANTED -- Riders to Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Leaving Ann Arbor Fri. morning, July
15th. Phone 3-2065. )30

r...__.._._

2

pair $11.00,

NATIONAL AB R H
Schoehdlenst, 2b .. .6 0 2
Ennis, If............1 0 0
eMusial, ef.-.........4 1 1
Snider, of ..........2 0 0
Mays, cf ..........3 2 2
Kluszewski, lb.....5 1 2
Mathew s,3b.......2 0 0
Jackson, 3b .......3 1 1
Mueller, rf .........2 0 1
d Aaron, rf .........2 1 2
Banks, ss .........2 0 0
Logan, ss ..........3 0 1
Crandall, c .........1 0 0
e Burgess;-c ........1 0 0
It Lopata, c ........3 0 0
Roberts, p ..........0 0 0
a Thomas .......,..1 0 0
Haddix, p ....,......0 0 0
f Hodges ...........1 0 1
Newcombe, p .......0 0 0
i Baker............1 0 0
Jones, p ..........0 0 0
Nuxhall, p ...,..... 2 0 0
Conley, p .........,0 0 0
Totals..........45 6 13
a-Popped out for Roberts in
3rd
b-Popped out for Pierce in 4th
c-Struck out for Ennis in 4th
d-Ran for Mueller in 5th
e-Hit into force play for Cran-
dall in 5th
f-Singled for Haddix in 6th
g-Popped out for Wynn in 7th
h-Safe on error for Burgess
in 7th
i-Flied out for Newcombe in
7th
Amer. .400 001000000-5 10 2
Nats. ..000 000 230 001-6 13 1
ET&TE

BERT THOMAS is greeted by his wife, Marion, and daughter,
Sharon, 11, at Victoria, B.C., after swimming the Strait of Juan
de Fuca from Port Angeles, Wash., to Victoria. The 275 pounder,
an ex-marine, took 11 hours to complete the 18-mile swim to be
the first to successfully cross the strait.
Big League Homerun Records
In Jeopard at Midseason

$5 95
pair

'.,

FREE CUFF
ALTERATIONS

.NEW YORK (A)-Major league
home run hitters, starting a three-
day respite Monday from their
regular season slugging, will shat-
ter the existing records for both
circuits if they continue their pace
in the second half of the cam-
paign.
Figures compiled by The Asso-
ciated Press reveal that a total of
1,268 homers were hit up to the
"All-Star break" with National
League batters accounting for 717
and American League players for
551.

An aggregate of 1,112 home runs
was walloped in as many games
last season, when the National
wound up with 1,114 and the A-
merican with 823.
The National League record is
1,197 established in 1953 and its
current crop of fearsome sluggers
is well ahead of that year when 645
four-baggers were on the books
around All-Star time.
The American League mark of
973 was set in 1950. This season's
junior circuit' pace is only seven
behind the one in '50.

* ASSORTED
COLORS

SAM'S STORE

I

FIRST AMERICAN FILM
TO WIN THE COVETED
GRAND PRIZE
AT THE INTERNATIONAL $Y
FLFETVAL
IN ANNES

SI

" MARTY makes such
beautiful music."--Irving Berlin
Make room
''for my
friend
MARTY
t He's tops!'
-Danny Thomas

1 i " aQ

I

rdo

-

"Rerfectionz 4n Modern Cooling "

I

-1

.

I

TONIGHT
Red aripet

122 E. Washington
Sam J. Benjamin, '27 Lit., Owner

SHOWN
AT
9 P.M.
ONLY

PREVIEW TONIGHT
Along with our regular show we are
privileged tonight to present an
advance preview of one of the most
unusual and heart-warming movies of
this or any other year
The star you'll be seeing in the-surprse
role of his career creates feelings.and
emotions far from his usual stock in trade,
We cannot reveal the title of the picture or
the, name, of the star. But when you see the-o
you'll know why we're so happy to present
them. And you'll be so happy you czmel
Come either 7 or 9 P.M. See both
Preview and Regular Feature.

SUMMER

DIRECORIE

//

STILL AVAILABLE

I

at the,

He's your kind of guy..
in your kind of picture!

:, ::. w 1

5 }?h

,-lL x w T'f 'wVxl'": n .. .

EIS

a ~ m ~L 5~M ST3TT~>II U - Ee .. ~AIRC

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