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June 24, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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A IME MICHIGAN DAILY

RSDAY. J _

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TWTW~I~AY' iTThT~ ~t

casWALWti A'JLi* NTJ,&'VJCs Pd, 17

YEARS OF 'DAILY' SERVICE:
Shop Superintendent Serves as Liaison

Institute Operated by 'U'
Prospers in Philippines

Townsend To Play at League Dance

4)

By JOHN SOBELOFF,
Ken Chatters probably does not
nd on the first floor of the Stu-
at Publications Building and
Ld up the rest of the institution
h its bare hands.
But anyone who has worked on
ident publications can tell you
it the good-humored and effi-
nt shop superintendent is, at
st figuratively, the foundation
the Daily's daily operation.
He's A Landmark
it The Daily, he's as much a
idmark as the Publications
ilding-and he's been around
en longer. This July, Ken, who
19, will have been holding things
at The Daily for 25 years.
:n his familiar rimless spec-
:les, shirtsleeves and vest, Ken
ends about half of his workday
advertising typography. He is.
e man who knows what style of
> to use, how big to make it,
w to space it.
Except for The Daily business
ff and the advertisers, probably
one is conscious of the results
his typographical decisions. His
>ographical skill is well recog-
;ed, however. He served as lec-
'er on typography for the jour-
lism department from 1952 to
54, and has been consulted on
pographical and mechanical
)blems for several papers. Ken
largely responsible for The
ily's winning the coveted In-
7d Press Association Typography
rard last year.
Shop Manager
Besides handling the typogra-
.ial W'ork, Ken is the mechani-
tsupervisor, responsible' for
eping The Daily's $140,000 worth
equipment running efficiently.
On the side, Ken is responsible
building maintenance-and is
hief parking lot attendant," he
lains with a laugh.
One of the biggest parts of Ken's
rk is his job as liaison between
full-time mechanical depart-
nt and the student staffs of
paper.
Ken's intense interest reflects
pride in The Daily and in his
fession. "He's a real typogra-
ical scholar," one Daily editor
t it. Ken's pride in and con-
n for The Daily appear espec-
* X400

--By Harding Williams
INDISPENSABLE-Ken Chatters works amid the familiar sur-
roundings of The Daily shop.

owns a company publishing three
weeklies in California," Ken said.
Edited Paper
At Flint JC, Ken was the first
managing editor of "The College
Clamor," a newspaper puolished
irregularly, but printed. "The pre-
sident shuddered at the name,"
Ken recalls - "Sounded like a
bunch of radicals."
After JC, Ken got married and
went to California to work for
his brother. He was sent to lino-
type school, where he learned the
mechanics and operation of that
complex machine.
"I began to take a serious in-
terest in, it, and later I went back
to the school again. I'd study the
book at home, go down to the
place at night and tak3 the ma-
chine apart, put it together agin'."
His wife helped him by typing
his lessons when he took coires-
pondence school courses i- jour-
nalism and printing from the Uni-
versity of California.
Ken learned printing, mechanics
and the eperation of various ma-
chines during his five y ars ap-
prenticeship. "I wasn't satisfied
with one thing, I had to learn the
whole business," he says.
In 1930, Ken went back to Flint,
then soon came to Ann Arbor
where re went to school days anti
worked at the Ann Arbor Press,
and Ken began work on The Daily
there.
After a year and a half, lie heard
of the shop superintendent open-
ing at the newly-built Student
Publications Building. Prof. Edson
R. Sunderland of the Law School,
then chairman of the Board in
Control of Student Publications,
interviewed and hired him.
"I was young and exuberant,
Ken remembers. "The fact that
all this was in the midst of the'
depression didn't mean anything
to me--I probably didn't realize
that jobs were so scarce.
Has Thought of Le'iing
Ken has occasionally thought of
leavir. g his Daily job, lured by
thoughts of bigger opp rtunities,
but he has stayed with it because,
he says, he likes the job and Ann
Arbor.

The University of the Philip-
pines and the University of Mi-
chigan are operating an Institute
of Public Administration.
Prof. Daniel S. McHargue of the
political science department has
been acting as liaison officer for
the Institute. Recently he issued
the sixth progress report on oper-
ations of the Institute in the
Philippines.
Outstanding Center
According to Prof. McHargue's
report, the Institute is continuing
to enlarge its reputation as the
outstanding regional center for
Southeast Asia in the field of
public administration training.
Ten graduate scholarships to
students from Asian countries are
granted annually to the Institute
for work in public administratione
School Serves a Need
Reason for the growing popular-
ity of the Institute was given by
Philippine President Ramon Mag-'
saysay when he wroteto Prof. Mc-'

Hargue, "I recognize the need for
employees who are especially
trained in public administration
and it is my earnest hope that the
Institute will soon adequately fill
this need with its graduates."
Among the problems existing for
the Institute, according to Prof.
McHargue's report, is of adequate
financial support of the Phillip-
pine operation.
Contract To Terminate
The University contract with
the. University of the Philippines
for support of the Institute ter-
minates next year.
In addition, there is still a lack
of adequate testing machinery
through which Institute trained
students can attain civil service
eligibility and enter public service.
About 35,000 American tourists
visited Ireland in the summer of
1954, an increase of 20 per cent
over the previous year.

Al Townsend and his orchestra
will be featured at the League's
Saturday night dances during the
summer session.
Composed of four members,
Townsend's combo will begin its
fourth season tomorrow in the
League Ballroom.

The dances starting at 9 p.M.
will serve a double purpose for
University students, since they
may come plus or minus dates.
The price is 50 cents per person.
Read Daily Classifieds

""'-
I.

Ii

ially when he talks about The
Daily's plant-which he largely
built up.
"At first, when the building
wasn't paid for," he recalls, "we
skimped on mechanical equip-
ment." The Daily's press then was!
worth about $8,000 and turned out
about 3,000 papers "with erratic
printing qualities."
In his years on The Daily, Ken
has seen more than 20 senior
staffs come and go. "Because of
the students' prerogatives, it has
taken 20 years to accomplish some
things we could have done in one,"
Ken says.
Even a New Press
Today, the special pride of Ken's
shop is a new $75,000 press which
can turn out 25,000 12-page papers
in an hour, with consistently good
results.
Many other machines such as
the Fairchild engraver which pho-
to-electrically converts an ordi-
nary photograph into a plastic
Try FOLLETT'S First

A

engraving, are the result of Ken's
shop improvement program.
Prudent and Lavish
Ken displays a prudent concern
for the amount of type set but
never used, and other such daily
expenses.
But in the matter of equipment,
Ken shows what one editor termed
"a comparatively monumental
lavishness."
Ken was born in 1906 in Gaines,
Michigan on a farm just outside
of town, but he "didn't stay there
long." He moved to Flint, where
he graduated from Flint Central
High School in 1924. Ken's in-
terest in newspapers started on
the delivery end and worked back.
He carried papers from the age of
nine. Then he took some journa-
lism courses in high school and
was a high school and Flint Jun-
ior College correspondent for tle.
Flint Journal.
"My interest was really stimu-
lated by my oldest brother who

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