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August 04, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-08-04

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AUGUST 4, x.955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AUGUST 4, 1955THE MiCHIGAN DAilY

losox, Indians Win

VUKOVICH TRAGEDY CITED:
AAA Cuts Ties With U.S. AutoRacing

CLASSIFIEDS

To

Tighten ALRace

Vital Hits Bring Triumphs- -Hurricane'
Dodgers Stop Braves, 9-6 Hits Charles

By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Jackie Jensen's
dramatic two-run double in the
eighth inning gave the Boston
Red Sox a 6-4 victory over first-
place Chicago yesterday in a
r tense battle.
With the score tied 4-4, two out
and the count two strikes, Jensen
powered his long drive off reliefer
Dixie Howell.
The play was set up when Billy
Goodman singled and advanced on
first baseman Walt Dropo's error
on an attempted pickoff. Billy
Klaus struck out but Ted Williams
was given an intentional pass.
INDIANS 2, YANKEES 1
NEW YORK-A two-run homer
by ex-Yankee Gene Woodling and
a superb four-hit pitching per-
formance by Mike Garcia gave the
Cleveland Indians a 2-1 victory
over the New York Yankees in
their important series for second
place in the American League.
Woodling, peddled to Baltimore
last November and picked up by
game-deciding smash in the fourth
inning, scoring Al Smith, who had
walked.
All-American
Golf'Tourney
Starts Today
CHICAGO (M)-Tom O'Shanter's
F~ big '" midsummer golf carnival,
worth $212,000ein prizes, begins
today as more than 220 men and
> women player, tee off in the $30,-
000 All-American tourneys.
A contingent of 157 men shoot
for the $3,420 first prize in the
$25,000 All-American pro tourney,
while 24 feminine pros gun for the
$1,000 top swag in their $5,000
competition.
40 Amateurs Entered
In addition, 24 men amateurs
and 16 women amateurs also will
' join the 72-hole medal play melee,
a four-fairway circus which con-
cludes Sunday.
The All-American, however, is
merely a spritely curtain-raiser to
Tam O'Shanter's two-day inter-
national matches, between the top
eight United States and top for-
eign entries, next Tuesday and
Wednesday, and the $100,000 cash
"World" meet, Aug. 11-14.
-Major Leagi

DODGERS 9, BRAVES 6
MILWAUKEE - Gil Hodges
smacked two mighty homeruns,
including the 11th grand slammer
of his major league career, and
drove in six runs to power Brook-
lyn to a 9-6 win over the Milwau-
kee Braves and increase its Na-
tional League lead to 141/2 games.
PIRATES 3-4, CUBS 2-5
CHICAGO - Catcher Harry
Chiti's two-out single in the 12th
inning gave the Chicago Cubs a
5-4 win over Pittsburgh in the
second game of a doubleheader
after the Pirates won the opener,
3-2.
Jim King doubled with one out
in the 12th for his fourth hit of
the game, Ranson Jackson walked,
and Eddie Miksis flied out for the
second out before Chiti singled in
King.
TIGERS 3, SENATORS 0
WASHINGTON - Detroit fur-
ther tightened the American Lea-
gue pennant race defeating Wash-
ington 3-0 behind the two-hit
pitching of Frank Lary, who hurl-
ed the Tigers within 6% games
of pace-setting Chicago.
* * *
GIANTS 5, CARDINALS 3
ST. LOUIS-Lefty John Windy
McCall weathered two home runs
by Bill Virdon to. pitch the New
York Giants to their fourth
straight victory and handed the
St. Louis Cardinals a sixth suc-
cessive setback, 5-3.
* * *
ORIOLES 4-1, ATHLETICS 3-5
BALTIMORE-Rookie Bob Hale
stepped in as a pinch hitter with
two strikes against him and
smashed a two-run double in the
ninth inning as the Baltimore
Orioles defeated Kansas City Wed-
nesday night 4-3 in the first game
of a twi-night doubleheader.
But the Athletics came back
quickly in the sacond game to
push over three runs in the first
inning and coast to a 5-1 decision
behind lefty Alex Kellner's seven-
hit pitching.
PHILLIES 8, REDLEGS 4
CINCINNATI - The Philadel-
phia Phils, who had gone through
23 2-3 innings without scoring a
run against Cincinnati, burst
forth for eight runs, seven of them
unearned, in the sixth inning and
an 8-4 victory over the Redlegs.

In Bout W in
SYRACUSE, N. Y. (P)-Tommy
"Hurricane" Jackson, a tireless
dancing man, swarmed over Ez-
zard Charles last night and shook
off the former champion's heavy
bombs to win a unanimous deci-
sion in a fiercely fought 10-round
match at War Memorial Audi-
torium.
Charles. weighed 19112, Jackson
1913/4
Although the 34-year-old Char-
les hit Jackson with everything
he had, landed cleanly on the chin
with his right and dug the left to
the body, he never could bring
him down.
Hurricane vs. Tornado
Instead of dropping, the Hurri
cane man would fade back for a
second and then resume his con-
stant flicking jab.
In the final round they really
went at it, Charles shooting the
works with every punch he threw.
Referee Ruby Goldstein scored
it 6-4, Judge Dick Fazio had it
8-2 and Judge Ted Shiels 6-2-2,
all for Jackson. The AP card
was for Jackson, 6-4.
Hambletonian

WASHINGTON ()-The Amer-
ican Automobile Assn., citing the
recent Lemans, France tragedy
and the death of Bill Vukovich in
the Indianapolis Speedway classic
as contributing reasons, announc-
ed yesterday it was getting out of
the automobile racing business.
The AAA has directed nearly all
the major auto races in this coun-
try since 1902.
In announcing the organization's
action, President Andrew J. Sor-
doni of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., said:
Benefits Questionable
"Racing has unquestionably be-
come a popular spectacle in the
United States, but there is serious
question that racing contributes
in a material way to better cars or
better parts for cars."
Sordoni said "there can be no
doubt" that the disaster at Le-
mans, France, in which 79 were
killed and 91 hurt was a factor in
the AAA decision.
"All who have a knowledge- of
racing events in this country know
that it 'could happen here.' The
AAA feels that it should no longer
be identified with this activity."
To Finish Year
Sordoni said the organization
would fulfill all its commitments
for the current racing year but
that at the end of the year it will
"disassociate" itself from all auto
racing in this country.
Officials of the AAA said the
organization gives its sanction to
only about 10 per cent of auto
races in this country, but noted
that these are the principal events,
including the Indianapolis "500.'
The AAA's contest board, which
has been active since 1902, has
Stake Captured

races with high honors going to
the champions.
An Automotive Hall of Fame
was set up a few years ago by the
AAA.
A spokesman for the organiza-
tion said the AAA is "hopeful that
auto racing will go on in this
country."
He said the AAA believes some
other organization may decide to
get into the field and insist on
high standards in the races.
The AAA has not put up money
for the racing championships but
it has set up a contest board ben-
evolent fund for the benefit of
injured drivers.
The spokesman said that "ob-
viously" the death of Bill Vuko-
vich in this year's Indianapolis
race also played a part in the
organization's decision.
The contest board will be con-
tinued as a "standing board" and
will concern itself with "the cer-
Belgian Sets
World Record
OSLO () -Roger Moens of
Belgium, bettered the world
record for 800-meters Wednes-
day night at Bislett Olympic
Stadium with a time of 1:45.7.
The listed mark is 1:46.6 set
by Rudolf Harbig of Germany
in 1939.
tification of records and other
activities of concern to the motor-
ist as a consumer."
Emphasis on Power
Sordoni said in a statement:
"It was the feeling of our execu-
tive committee that automobile
racing as now conducted in this
country, with emphasis on speed,
power and human endurance, is
not conpatible with one of the
main objectives of the AAA and
its affiliated clubs in the day-to-
day promotion of street and high-
way safety.
"We recognize, of course, that
automobile racing will continue
and our action is taken without
prejudice to racing, when conduct-
ed under the highest possible safe-
ty standards."
At Indianapolis, officials of the

the 40th 500-mile race will go on
as scheduled next May 30 and
predicted that other major races
will be continued also.
Referring to the AAA action.
Speedway owner Anton Hulman
Jr. said, "I don't see any reason
why it should affect the 500."
He predicted that some new
sponsoring group will be set up to
take over the duties formerly
handled by the AAA contest board.
Hulman said yesterday's action
came as a complete surprise to
him.
Col. Arthur W. Herrington of
Indianapolis, chairman of the AAA
contest board, said he will discuss
with officers of the Sports Car
Club of American the possibility
that the group might sponsor the
500-mile race.
Herrington said the SCCA is the
only existing club that would be
likely to qualify for sanction by
the Federation Internationale Au-
tomobile. The FIA sanctions the
500 and other big races throughout
the world.
NASCAR Also Possibility
There were indications the Na-
tional Assn. of Stock Car Auto
Racing may try to take over the
role the AAA has occupied.
Bill France, NASCAR president,
said at Daytona Beach, Fla., all
AAA drivers and car owners are
welcome to compete in NASCAR-
sanctioned events if they meet
qualifications.
That includes an agreement to
race exclusively in NASCAR-
sanctioned races.
Moore Traiing;
'Really Flying'
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. (P) -
Lightheavyweight champion Ar-
chie Moore is giving his handlers
nightmares with his aerial frolics.
The man who hopes to lift Rocky
Marciano's heavyweight crown
Sept. 20 is taking daily flying les-
sons.
Every morning he takes off in a
single motor plane with his in-
structor, George West. West says
Moore should be able to take the
controls after eight hours of fly-
ing.

been giving contest points for the I Indianapolis Motor Speedway said

PERSONAL
AMERICA'S ONLY SPORTS WEEKLY -
Sports Illustrated. 17 weeks $2, 35
weeks $4. Special offer good only
through August. Call NO 3-8146. )1F
AUGUST SPECIALS-on Ladies Home
Jour., Holiday, and many others.
CallStudent Periodical Agency, NO
2-3061. )F8
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE Skip-Dents sport shirts.
$1.39, 2 for $2.50. Sanforized, assorted
colors. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)15B
ELECTRO-VOICE SP8B SPEAKER-in
Klipsch licensed enclosure. $45. Phone
NO 2-8777 before 10 p.m. )21B
SOFA-BED-maple, good condition. 12
inch base reflex cabinet. Call NO 5-
2713 ) 22B
ROOMS FOR RENT
AUGUST 13-SEPTEMBER 18 - $5 per
week. Trigon Fraternity. NO 3-5806
)20D
FREE ROOM RENT-to male students
in exchange for work. NO 3-8454. )21D
WANTED TO RENT
APARTMEN T WANTED - for married
couple. Contact Stanford Sheyer, 36
W. Hannum Blvd., Saginaw, Mich.,
Tel. 2-4052. )4L
BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-F1

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS - and Ironing& separately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick-up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. , )2J
BABY SITTER, day or evening, 50c per
hour. NO 2-9020. )8J
USED CARS
1955 CHEVROLET Station Wagon--Ra-
dio, heater, 7000 actual miles. Save
$600. The big lot across from the
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)20N
1954 FORD 4-door--Black, radio, heater,
12000 miles. Sharp. The big lot across
from the downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. - )19N
1953 CHEVROLET 2 Door Bel-Aire--Ra-
dio, heater, 9000 actual miles. The big
lot across from the downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )18N
'48 CADILLAC SEDAN-fully equipped.
$795. You get a better deal at Fitzger-
ald-Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit St. NO
8-8141. )17N
1937 CADILLAC, 4-door. $125. Very good
condition. Wouldn't sell except mov-
ing NYC. NO 8-9621 After 5. )$3N
REAL ESTATE
WELL PAYING GRILL-close to cam-
pus. Reasonable, terms. Ross Real
Estate, NO 2-7736 or NO 2-8137 eve-
nings. )2R
HOTEL-35 rooms, centrally located,
furrnished. reasonable, terms. Ross
Real Estate, NO 2-7736 or NO 2-8137
evenings. )3R
TRANSPORTATION

'A

Components and Service
Audiophone, net prices
TEL EFUN KEN
Hi-Fi, AM-FM shortwave radios
Service on all makes of
radios and phonographs
nn Arbor Radio & T

'V

WANTED - ride to Nebraska leaving
13th or 14th. Will help drive and
share expenses. Wayne Walkenhorst,
Composing Room, Student Publica-
tions. NO 2-3241. -, )8G

!,

1217 S. University Phone NO!
1%, blocks east of East Eng.

8-7942
;6J

B
By. Scott Frost in Fast Heats

HELD OVER THROUGH SATURDAY
NOTVIA

GOSHEN, N.Y. (P) - Speedy
Scott Frost from California, the*
odds-on favorite, won the $86,-
863.32 Hambletonian Stake in two
spectacular heats yesterday, hang-
ing up the\ fastest time in the
famed sulky derby since his daddy,
Hoot Mon, copped the event in
1947.
Long Remembered
The result of the 30th buggy
whip classicwas no great surprise
to a sweltering crowd estimated
at 16,000 but everyone in cramped
Good Time ,Park knew it was a
horse race that will long be re-
membered.
The big striding bay colt owned
by Sol Camp of Shafter, Calif.,
Chisox' Donovan
To Return Soon
CHICAGO (P) - The Chicago
White Sox yesterday heard the
good news that their ace right-
hander, Dick Donovan, was on his
feet after an emergency appendec-
tomy Saturday night and will start
light workouts next Monday.
General Manager Frank Lane
said that Donovan felt so good at
Mercy Hospital that his doctor
indicated he might return to the
Sox lineup in a couple of weeks.
Donovan, 27, owner of a fine
13-4 record, had been expected to
be out at least one month.

had to go all out to grab the first
heat from 10 rivals, coming down
the stretch to beat out a 21-1 shot
named Leopold Hanover by a half
length.
Then, with everyone expecting
Scott Frost to really chill his op-
position in the second mile spin an
hour later, little Joe O'Brien had
to rely on all his driving skill and
the heart of a real champion to
grab a head verdict over Galo-
phone, second choice in the bet-
ting.
Scott Frost's clocking for the
second dash as 2:00 3-5, which
compared with the Hambletonian
record of 2:00 minutes flat set by
his illustrious sire eight years ago.
Scott Frost's first heat was tim-
ed in 2:01 3-5, but he wasn't fully
extended,
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AIR CONDITIONED
6 BARBERS
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of IV BARBERS
715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment
Read Daily Classifieds

Cinema ui/
presents
ALFRED H ITCHCOCK'S
FOREIGN
CORRESPONDENT
with
JOEL McCREA
LARAI NE DAY HERBERT MARSHALL
Thursday and Friday at 7:00 and 9:00;
50c ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

I

GLORIA DIAL 2-2513
Mats, 65c
GRAHAME
Eves. 94c
Child. 25c -r, c odern Go i-

I

tie Standings
1NATIONAL LEAGUE

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

i

Chicago ....63
New York .:63
Cleveland ..63
Boston .....62
Detroit ....,..57
Kansas City 44
Washington 35
Baltimore ..32

L
40
42
42
44
47
62
69
72

Pct.
,612
.600
.600
.581
.546
.415
.357
.308

GB
1
1
3
6%1
201/
281/
31% 1

W
Brooklyn ...73
Milwaukee , .58
New York ..57
Philadelphia 54
Chicago ... .52
Cincinnati ..49
St. Louis ...45
Pittsburgh ..40
TODAY'S
Philadelphia at

L Pct. GB
33 .689 -
47 .552 14f
50 .'553 161/
57 .486 211
58 .473 23
57 .462 24
57 .441 26
69 .367 341/y
GAMES
Cincinnati -

4,
There's only one
and it's a
-------------
-RIG
-- - - - - -
a *j &

TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at New York-Score
(10-9) vs. Ford (12-5).
Chicago at Boston-Pierce (7-7)
vs. Nixon (10-5).
Kansas City at Baltimore --
Harrington (1-2) vs. Lopat
(4-8).
Detroit' at Washington-Garver
(10-10) vs. Abernathy (3-4).

I

II

Wehmeier (7-9) vs. Black (5-
1) or Gross (0-0).
Brooklyn at Milwaukee-New-
combe (18-1) vs. Spahn (9-
11) or Burdette (8-5).
Pittsburgh at Chicago-Donoso
(2-6) vs. Pollet (3-3).
New York at St. Louis (night)
- Hearn (11-10) vs. Woold-
ridge (2-4).

i,

I.

DIAL 2-3136

STARTS TODAY

JAMES STEWART brings you a role to match his triumphs
in "Rear Window" and "The Glenn Miller Story."

..

t
1'

fail to capture the true magic of the original.
The moment your feet feel "RUMPUS" soft-
ness and supple flexibility, you'll know what
we mean. If it's NOT a PENAUO, it's NOT
'the "RUMPUS". You'll love this feather-

. A U. AILIF-MA.Y f- ,i.' .f

I

I t

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