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July 21, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-21

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', JULY 21, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

PAGE

', JULY 21, 1955T HE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

MICHIGAN-TOLEDO 'WAR':
Special TV Drama To Be Presented

"Studio Sampler" will depart
{ from its usual format and present
the special television drama,
"Mason of Michigan."
The program was first presented
last week as part of a Radio and
- T.V. demonstration for the Special
Summer Session series on Michi-
gan, and will be telecast tomorrow
\night with the same cast.
The play shows Steven T. Mason
as Territorial Governor of Michi-
gan during the time of the "Toledo
War." The war involved Michigan
and Ohio, and was over an area of
Sland called the "Toledo Strip" that
was claimed by both Ohio and
Michigan.
"Toledo Claimed"
Michigan's original territorial
grant included the city of Toledo.
The port of Maumee, Ohio, under
the direction of Governor Lucas,
had the area surveyed and found
it to be in Ohio.
Governor Lucas named the area
Lucas County. The country was
split in feeling over who really
owned the area, and the "Toledo
War" began.
The play shows Governor Ma-
son's part in the "war" and the
reactions in Michigan and in
Washington. 'Finally it depicts
Mason's, efforts to bring Michigan
into the Union.
"Hopwood Winners"
The original TV drama was
written by Bethany Wilson, a Hop-
wood winner, and will be directed
by Dave Connell, a Graduate stu-
dent in the speech department.
Members of the cast are Julian
Burroughs, Grad., who will play
Mason, Gerry Adams, Grad.,
Gladys Riddle, Grad., Valerie
Schor, Grad., Paul Heilinger,
n Grad., Gary Johnson, Grad., Bob
Reinhart, Grad., Lloyd Kaiser,
Grad., Joe Frisinger, '56, Jerry
Hockstad, '56, Ted Nielsen, Grad.,
Gordon Mars, '56 and Berle Dean,
Grad.
The drama will go out "live"
over WPAG-TV Channel 20, on
Friday and simultaneously will be
kinescoped and then sent out to
stations throughout the state, to
be seen by an estimated one mil-
lion people.

TU' Summer
Band oncert
Set Tonight.
An outdoor concert is scheduled
by the University Summer Session
Band for 8:00 p.m. tonight on the
diagonal.
The concert will be conducted by
Prof. William D. Revelli, director
of University Bands, and is part
of the Seventh Annual National
Band Conductors' Conference
which is meeting here this week.
The band will open the program
with "Invictus," a march by King.
It will be followed by Bach's chor-
ale "If Thou Be Near" and the
overture to "Raymond" by Thom-
as.
A clarinet solo "Concertino" by
Weber and the "Ballet" from "La
Vie Parisienne" by Offenbach will
conclude the first half of the
program.
The second half of the program
will include "Michigan on Parade,"
by King, "Summertime" from
"Porgy and Bess" by Gershwin,
"Prima Donna" by Gould, "On the
Quarterdeck" by Alford, "Suite of
Old American Dances" by Ben-
nett and "Anniversary March" by
Goldman.
Al Townsend will play the trom-
bone solo in "Summertime."
Prof. Revilli urges that all those
coming bring coats to sit on since
there will not be benches or chairs
set up. The concert will be held in
Hill Auditorium in case of rain.
Earl V. Moore, Dean of the nusic
school, will lecture the more than
400 band conductors gathered for
the conference at 10:30 a.m. to-
morrow in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
Dean Moore will discuss "Grad-
uate Work in Music: Looking
Backward and Forward Twenty-
Five Years."
The conference will conclude at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow wit ha concert
by the Michigan All Star High
School Wind and Percussion En-
semble in Hill Auditorium. Prof.
Revelli will conduct. The band is
composed of 112 carefully
screened band musicians.

Square Da
Bob Osgood, a nationally known
caller, will be featured in a com-
munity square dance at 8:00 p.m.
tomorrow on Palmer Field.
From 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. to-
morrow, Osgood will run a work-
shop program for callers of square
and round dancing in Waterman
Gymnasium. Both are free to the
public.
As a technical advisor for
square and round dance sequences
to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Osgood
worked on "Summer Stock" and
'"The Cowboy."
Editor and publisher of the na-
tional square dance magazine
"Sets in Order," he is producer
for Capital Records of all square
dance releases and has appeared
on several disks.
In 1950, Osgood planned, pro-
duced and acted as Master of
Ceremonies for the world's largest

once Slated
square dance, held in Santa Mon-
ica, California. More than 15,000
square dancers and 35,000 specta-
tors took part.
Osgood has produced more than
40 instruction and entertainment
type television shows in Los An-
geles. For 18 weeks he appeared
as "Mr. Square Dance" on "All
American Jubilee.
Politzer To Talk
To French Club
A lecture on "J. J. Rousseau and
Language Education" will be given
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Michigan
League by Prof. Politzer, visiting
Harvard University faculty mem-
ber.
Sponsored by the Fr¢nch Club,
the talk will be given in English.

I

CLASSIFIEDS

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

MICHIGAN 'WAic'-A drama entitled 'Mason of Michigan' will be
produced on TV on 'Studio Sampler' tomorrow night. The drama,
written by former Hopwood winner Bethany Wilson, tells the
story of the controversy over Toledo, which was at one time
claimed by both Michigan and Ohio. The program is being pre-
sented as part of 'the University's Summer Session Michigan
Program.
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS:
Cleveland, Hinds Pro moted
In 'U' Hospital Administration

Two administrative promotions
at the University Hospital were
announced yesterday by Dr. Al-
bert Kerlikowske, director.
Robert 0. Cleveland and Richard
Hinds, formerly administrative as-
sistants, have been advanced to
assistant directors.
Cleveland is administrator in
charge of the Krege Medical Re-
search Building. Hinds is respon-
sible for the Outpatient Clinic.
A native of Grand Rapids, Cleve-
land was administrative assistant

at Blodgett Memorial -Hospital in
Grand Rapids from 1939-41.
Upon discharge from the Medi-
cal Administrative Corps, he joined
the staff as credit manager of
University Hospital in 1945 and
was made administrative assistant
in charge of Kresge Medical Re-
search Institute in 1952.
Cleveland has received a Bache-
for of Science in mechanical engi-
neering and Master in industrial
engineering from the University.
He is president of the Ann Arbor
Community Chest.

(Continued from Page 2)
"The Effect of Memophilus pertussis
and its Labile Toxin on the Physiology
of the Rat Trachea," Friday, July 22,
1566 East Medical Bldg., at 1:00 a.m.
Chairman, D. J. Merchant.
Doctoral Examination for Moe Stan-
ley wasserman, Chemistry; thesis: "The
Physical and Chemical Composition of
Photoconductive Lead Sulfide Films,"
Friday, July 22, 3003 Chemistry Bldg., at
9:30 a.m. Chairman, L. O. Brockway.
Concerts
Student Recital. Frances Dell, pianist,
program in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the Master of Music
degree at 8:30 p.m. Thurs., July 21,
in Rackham Assembly Hall. Composi-
tions by Mozart, Chopin, and Schu-
mann. Open to the public. Miss Dell is
a pupil of John Kollen.
Carillon Recital by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, 7:15 p.m.
Thurs., July 21. American program of
three religious airs, nine short carillon
compositions, and two Stephen Foster
songs.
Student Recital Postponed. The pro-
gram by Lois Bruce, soprano, previously
announced for Fri. evening, July 22, in
Aud. A, Angell Hall, has been postponed
until Thurs. evening, Aug. 11.
Events Today
Heartbreak House, by George Bernard
Shaw, presented by the Department
of Speech, tonight at 8:00 p.m. in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. Tickets on sale
at the theater box office today from
10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. $1.50-$1.10-75c.
The International Center Teas will be
held at Madelon Pound Home at 1024
Hill Street on Thursday from 4:30-5:301
p.m.
"Religion in Higher Education" -
luncheon discussion led by Dr. Arnold
Nash, author of "The University in the
Modern World." Thurs., July 21, 12:00
m., Lane Hall . 40c. Reservations re-
quested.
The Department of Journalism and
the Graduate School will show Edward
R. Murrow film, A Conversation With
Oppenheimer, Thurs., July 21, at 10:00
a.m. and 4:15 p.m. in Rackham Ampi-
theater.
Film Forum on American Education.
Summer Session Film Forum on Inter-

national Education Thurs., July 21, 8:00
p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall. Colored
films produced for the National Edu-
cation Association, entitled "Freedom
to Learn" and "Skippy and the Three
R's."
Sailing Club meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Room 3-B, Union. Topic, Rides to the
Wisconsin Regatta.
Coming Events
Faculty Luncheon with Dr. Arnold
Nash - "Current Trends in Higher
Education." We will go through the
Cafeteria line at the League and take
trays across the hell to the Conference
Room. Fri., July 22, 12:00 m. Please
call Lane Hall, Ext. 2851, if you plan
to attend.
Punch Dour at Lane Hall, 4:15-5:30,
Fri., July 22. Dr. Arnold Nash will be
our guest.
Invitations for the Master's Breakfast,
Sun., July 31, are in the mail. Candi-
dates for the Master's degree at the
close of the Summer Session who have
not received invitations are asked to
call for them at the office of the
Summer Session, Room 3510, Adminis-
tration Bldg.
4Wi
° ©vr r . 4n mfodern Coolin
DIAL. 2-2513
ALL OVER TOWN THEY'RE
TALKING ABOUT "MARTY"
-IRST AMERICAN FILM
TO WIN THE COVETED
RAND PRIZE
AT TM EITRNATIONMA
FIM ESTIVAL
A ,m

MICHIGAN DAILY
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Phon e NO 2-3241
PERSONAL
TIME-6c a copy; LIFE-8c. Others at
student discount rates. Phone Student
Periodical, 2-3061. )5F
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED-Special Offer-
17 weeks for $2, 35 weeks for $4 (app.
Ile per issue!). Also special rates on
TIME. Call NO 3-8146. )1F
PARTNER NEEDED - international
apartment deal. "West Side! !" Macht
schnell! ! 50 cartwheels per month.
"Sorry, Lady-Bachelors only." Call
NO 3-2833 evenings. )6F
FOR SALE
SIAMESE-Seal pointe kittens with pa-
pers. Stud service. Call Peterson's NO
2-9020. )4B
SHORT SLEEVE Skip-Dents sport shirts.
$1.39, 2 for $2.50. Sanforized, assorted
colors. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
) 15B
1954 VM Tri-O-Matic hi-fidelity phono-
graph machine in A-1 condition with
brass legs and 45 rpm adapter, three
speakers. Total value $149. Will sell for
$95cash. Call NO 3-1531 ext. 106 after
5:30. )B
WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE or apartment
wanted by faculty couple for first se-
mester or year. Phone NO 8-8277. )2L
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR MEN-singles and doubles
$7, one block from campus. Phone NO
2-0293 evenings. ) 17D
SPACIOUS FRONT ROOM, Student pre-
ferred, linens furnished, 1133 White
St. NO 8-7853. )18D
WASHINGS - and ironings separately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick-up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020., )2,S

BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-Fl
Components and Service
Audiophile, net prices
TELEFUNKEN
rn-Fl, AM-FM shortwave radios
Service on all makes of
radios and phonographs
Ann Arbor Radio & TV
1217 S. University Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. ) 8.J
BABY SITTER, day or evening. 500 per
hour. NO 2-9020. )8
TYPING-Theses, term papers, etc. Bea-
sonable rates, prompt service. 830 S.
Main. NO 8-7590. )10J
USED CARS
MODEL A-1929 2-door sedan. Call NO 2-
7020.
'49 Ford-2 door custom 8. $295
'49 Studebaker sedan. $265
You get a better deal at Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc., 607 Detroit St., NO 8-8141.
)13N
1950 CHEVROLET. Radio, heater, new
tires. The big lot across from the
downtown carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO'2-4588. )14N
1953 P.LYMOUTH hard-top. Radio, heat-
er, two-tone paint. One owner. The
big lot across from the downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. ) 15N
1950 OLDSMOBILE Station Wagon. Ra-
dio, heater, hydra-matic. New white-
wall tires. Low mileage, The big lot
across from the downtown carporl,
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )1G
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

'Communist Nations Shrink in Terms of Trade Exports

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Communist Russia and China,
two of the biggest nations in the
world in terms of land area, shrink
to a fractions of their size when
compared with others in terms of
trade exports.
The -United States easily be-
comes the biggest nation of the
world when conventional lines are
redrawn to show relative import-
ance. in world trade rather than
actual land area.
On this standard the face of Eu-
rope undergoes drastic change. All
a the nations ,of eastern Europe con-
tract and most of those in western
Europe expand. The United King-
dom is the biggest exporter in that
region, followed by West Germany
and France.
The distorted map representing
continents and countries on the
scale of their exports was prepared
by W. S. and E. S. Woytinsky as
one of the illustrations of "World
t Commerce and Governments," sec-
ond volume of a two-part factual
and statistical description of all
the major aspects of the world eco-
nomy being brought out in the fall
by the Twentieth Century Fund.
The first part, published two years
ago, was called "World Popula-
tion and Production."
Communist Data Estimated
The map, drawn on a projection
designed by Dr. Erwin Raisz, was
worked out from International
Monetary Fund figures giving 19-
52 export value in United States
dollars for some 90 countries and
areas that represent more than 92
per cent of world trade. No recent
data was available for Russia, Chi-
na or the Communist satellite na-
tions. The relative proportions of
these countries were estimated by
the authors on the basi* of the
latest available information.
The total value of exports in 19-
Reuther To Speak
On State Labor
CIO President Walter P. Reuther
will speak on "Labor and Michi-
gan" August 3 in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
His lecture will be part of the
Summer Session series of speeches
and exhibits devoted to Michigan.
Reuther awill also take part in a
panel discussion on "Impact of
Unionism on Michigan's Industrial
Economy." Prof.. William Haber of
the economics department will
chair the discussion.

JO URC'E FORrHMiNG 2Q r' CEA7F/'Y..FUND .SUP'V"
.S'W1 J At
EA tr.I
4N~i E. G
~~4~":-'V
NN
*Word~t~roi~r,9e.9rakic~d~m1A o
AP ewfeuurS.

Cin quild
presents
Tallulah Bankhead'
.as
Catherine the Great
A ROYAL SCANDAL
with
ANNE BAXTER
CHARLES COBURN
Thursday and Friday at 7:00 and 9:00
Saturday and Sunday: ALEC GUINNESS in
"Kind Hearts and Coronets"
50C ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

ISaline Mill

Theatre

...Life ---W

52 was almost 731/2 billion dollars.
The United States :accounted for
better than 15 billion of this, or
20 per cent of the total. The United
Kingdom had the next biggest
share, 712 billion or 10 per cent of
the total. Canada was in third
place with nearly five billion, fol-
lowed by West Germany with just
under four billion and France
about 100 million under that.
In 1952 these five nations ac-
counted for 48 per cent of world
exports and 43 per cent of the im-

ports. A total of 15 nations, the
Woytinskys point out, maintained
two-thirds of the world's trade
while the remaining third is dis-
tributed among some 75 countries
and areas.
Output, Exports Compared
Pointing to index figures making
possible comparison of the growth
< world industrial output and
world exports, the Woytinskys
state that in 1952 world industrial
production, excluding Russia was
63 per cent above the 1937 level.

At the same time, world exports
had risen only 35 per cent above
the 1937 level.
Thus, they continue, a gap has
developed between the growth of
world industrial production and
international trade. They conclude
that the lag in international ex-
change of goods seems to be a ma-
jor obstacle to the further in-
crease of production and improve-
ment in the world's standard of
living, especially in Western Eu-
rope.

U.S. 112 in Saline
/JP
a romantic comedy by
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
& Donald Windham

4
1
i
a
4
i
1
1
i
1
w
ti
4
t

HECHT-LANCASTER presents
ERNEST BORGNINE
and BETSY BLAIR
Story and Screenplay by PADDY CHAYEFSM0
Mats. Eves.
50c 80c
Saturday
BOB HOPE in
"The Seven Little Foys"

P==1

pia

Dial 2-3136

STARTS TODAY

Closes Sunday
Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sun., $1.65
Fri., Sat., $2.20, Closed Mon.
PHONE SALINE 31
I41

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Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards

F-IE

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