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July 20, 1955 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-07-20

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FOUR

oh1~THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,; t'[ T,20, 1955

..Y . ..,.,..,,....,SA.. U.. . 2(L 1953 ..

LIABILITIES INVOLVED:
Gittler Terms Obesity Disease

Fifth

Youth Festival Set

If you are overweight, you are
sick.
Obesity is now considered a "ser-
ious disease," according to Uni-
versity gland specialist Dr. Robert
Gittler.
His view is shared by life in-
surance-companies. One will find
that the rate he pays is higher
than that of someone whose weight
is considered a better risk.
Results
"Studies show," Dr. Gittler said
in a talk over WUOM, the Uni-
versity's radio station, "that the
overweight person is much more
liable to die of heart disease, high
blood pressure, diabetes, gall blad-

der disease and cirrhosis of the
liver."
Declaring the primary cause of
obesity "is eating more food than
the body needs," the University
specialist doubts patients who say,
"Honestly, doctor, I eat like a
bird."
The "bird" referred to, Dr. Gitt-
ler said, is the vulture.
Causes
Three common explanations of
why some people are obese, ac-
cording to the.gland specialist, are
1) they simply enjoy food, 2) they
eat the wrong food, and 3) they
sufer serolus emotional problems.

SUMMER

-Courtesy of Helena Kolda
MARIE WD N-'IT IS NEVER QUIET IN CAMBRIDGE'
Miss Radcliffe' Debuts
At Evening Garden Party

Sale

Warsaw St
For Contests
Warsaw, Poland will be dressed
in brilliant color for two weeks
when the Fifth World Festival
of Youth and Students is held this
month.
Native costumes will be worn for
demonstration dances every day
from July 31 to August 14 whenr
youth from countries including
Japan, C4 na, Latin America, Aus-
tria, France, Belgium, Denmark,
Norway, Africa, Finland and many
others attend the festival.
Various Contests
The Youth Festival is being
sponsored by the Anti-Fascist .
Committee of Soviet Youth. Com-
petition in athletics, art, dancing,
music, photography and crafts has
been planned.
In addition, youth groups from
colleges, business establishments
and a large range of occupations
will attend the festival.
In all participating countries,
fund-raising projects have been
launched in order to finance. the <
Warsaw trip for interested youth.
In Belgium a special postcard has
been issued, and proceeds from
sales will go to a fund for-festival-
goers.
Japan's Fetes
In Japan, fetes are being organ-
ized, the funds going towards cov-
ering the costs of that country's
delegation's trip.
In Great Britain, delegates
staged an extra fund drive to
assist young people of Kenya and
Malaya who want to come to the
festival in Warsaw.
Special stamps have been issued
in Denmark and Norway to raise
cash for attending the two-week
festivities.

Theusually busy summer social
season in Ann Arbor has been
made even more ebulient of late
by the arrival of Marie Winn of
New York City and Cambridge,
Massachusetts, (formerly of Pra-
gue, Czechoslovakia), writer, lec-
turer, ethnologist, tolberist, and
the reigning "Miss Radcliffe," so
designated by. the editors of the
Harvard University "Crimson."
Miss Winn, a diminutive, milk-
complexioned young woman with
intensely red hair, is well known in
scholarly circles for her many ar-
ticles on the economic develop-
ment of Czech folklore in America,
Moravian mysticism, and Slvonic
folk epos and songs.
Makes Formal Debut
Miss Winn made her formal de-
but to society last Sunday evening
at a tea dance and garden party
at the South State, Street home of
her sister and brother-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Foster Malcolm.
Later, the guests, among whom
were numbered Miss Winn's first
cousin Ludmila Krampflekova of
Prague, Mr. and Mrs. James A.
Borlicks of Westport, Conn. and
Palm Beach, and Dame Edith
Pechstein, formerly of Berlin, Miss
Winn's instructress in piano at
Radcliffe, adjourned to the Barton
Hills home of Dr. and Mrs. Maxim
Bash.
There, the cotillion was formed
and dancing continued until dawn.
On Monday, Miss Winn was fet-
ed at the .Borlicks home with a
salad luncheon and the arrival of
friends from Cambridge and Bad
Axe.
Talented Fiance
Among those to arrive was Miss
Winn's fiance, Mr. Dick Tracy, of
the Poetry Room, Harvard Univer-
sity, and Wimsatt, Vermont. Mr.
Tracy, for some time employed by
the New Haven and Hartford Rail-
road as a private investigator, is
Deadly Reptile
Inhabits State
Although there are 17 kinds of
snakes in the state of Michigan
only one species is dangerous.
According to Prof. Nrman E.
Hartweg, curator at the Univer-
sity's museum of Zoology the only
poisonous snake, a pit viper be-
longing to the rattlesnake family,
is known as the massasauga.
Prof. Hartweg described the rep-
tile as being, "smaller than most
rattlesnakes with rather weak ven-
om compared to that of the dia-
Mond-backed rattlesnakes in the
west and south.
Campers can take comfort from
the professors statement that he
mnows of no Michigan deaths
caused directly by the massasau-
ga's bite.
Prof. Hartweg explained that in
Michigan the snakes live in the
swamnier areas and spread to the
adjoining farms during the sum-
mer time.
"There's no getting around the
fact that the massasauga is quite
numerous in Michigan," Prof.
Hartweg commented. He urged
that adequate precautions against
the snake's bite be taken even
though it is rarely fatal.
Lutherans To Hold
Scout Conventions
Approximately 8,000 Boy Scout
workers and members of the Luth-
er League of America will meet at
the University in separate con-
ventions during the summer.
The- Luther League is expected
to draw about 4,000 persons, 12 to
18 years of age, from the United

now writing and translating from
the Provencal at Harvard, where
he has gained some note as an ex-
pert performer of Yugoslav folk-
dances.
While in Ann Arbor for the sum-
mer Miss Winn is staying at the
Ann Arbor Hill manse of Miss Hal-
ka Feinberg, now in Europe.
The quiet and pleasant seclusion
of the manse, she reports,,is high-
ly conducive to long stretches of
earnest writing . . . "It is never
quiet in Cambridge," she devulged,
"never quiet enough to put the
right final touches to the novel I
started last summer."
Intermingling Themes
Based on an intermingling of
themes from the history of settlers
in the Black Hills of Dakota, and
the Tatra Mountains in Southern
Slovakia, the novel may see the
light of print "perhaps sometime
next year or two."
Miss Winn also is utilizing her'
stay here for a refresher course
in the carilloneur's art with the
University Carilloneur.
In the past, she has given sev-
eral concerts on the famous Rus-
sian bells housed in the Graduate
School of Business Administration
at Harvard. "It's something I
picked up while in Bruges one
summer," she conveyed.
Miss Winn expects her Batche-
lor's degree from Radcliffe College
in 1958, after which she will point
her cream and black Jaguar to-
ward Colorado, where she expects
to spend three to four ,years on a
field study for Anaconda Copper.
Her fiance will meet her there,
after which they will be married
in Vancouver, B.C. and leave for
a lengthy stint in the north coun-
try gathering material for a book
on the folksongs and customs of
the Aleuts.

Wasp-waisted Dresses
in Silky Celanese Ace-
tate Jersey.
SPECIAL
7"9
and.
$1 0.00
Will not sag. Washes
well. Wrinkle resis-
t a n t. A wonderful
traveler. The elasti-
Alzed waist-band as-
ssuies a slim, flatter-
ing fit. Pastels, Navy,
Blues, Corals,- Prints.
t

MARSZALKOWSKA STREET, MAIN ARTERY OF WARSAW, SEEN AT CONSTITUTION SQUARE.
TO BE THE SITE OF THE FIFTH WORLD FESTIVAL OF YOUTH AND STUDENTS.

PICTURES
COURTESY OF
THE FIFTH
WORLD FESTIVAL
INTERNATIONAL
PREPARATORY
COMMITTEE

,,i
y.
ti,
Y'
.
Y
7
i,
y
-!

SIZ ES:
10-20, 12,
to 221/2

Hundreds of other dresses in
our July Clearance priced $7.95
to $25.M0

THE FESTIVAL STADIUM IN WARSAW BEFORE COMPETION

ON FOREST
OFF SOUTH U.

r

U

Special Purchase!

uddlylon
Nylon
MANDARIN
PAJAMAS
599
Back-to-the-dorm-value
find! Kitten-soft, no-iron
multifilament nylon crepe
pajamas, so easy to care
for and wonderful
to wear. Pink with blue,
blue with pink, mint with
aqua, helio with orchid.
Sizes 32 to 40.

DANCE PERFORMANCE BY AN ANHWEI ENSEMBLE OF THE
PEOPLE'S R9PUBLIC OF CHINA

STUDENT ENSEMBLE OF POZNAN PERFORMING
POLISH MOUNTAINEERS' DANCE

S

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1 -1

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