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July 17, 1954 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1954-07-17

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THEFINDO-CHINA
FAILURE
See Page 2

Latest Deadline in the State

Da111ii

FAIR; MODERATE

VOL. LXIV, No. 20S ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1954

FOUR PAGES

Quartet Prepares for Coming Concerti

-Daily-Duane Poole
QUARTET REHEARSES-Four School of Music faculty members rehearse the Racconto No. 1, writ-
ten by the Danish composer Jorgen Bentzon for the unusual combination of flute, saxophone, bas-
soon, and string bass. Left to right are: Nelson Hauenstein, flute; Clyde Thompson, bassoon;
Lewis Cooper, bassoon; and Sigurd Rascher, fgmous concert saxophonist and visiting faculty mem-
ber for the summer. The work will be played during a regular concert of the University Wood-

wind Quintet, Monday, July 26.
FBI Cheeks
Alleged Post'
Wage Bribe
WASHINGTON 0P)-Reports that
a $500 bribe was offered to a mem-
ber of Congress to influence his
vote on a postal workers' pay rate
bill were under investigation Fri-
day night by the FBI.
Atty. Gen. Brownell said the
matter was brought to the Justice
Department's attention by Rep.
Joel T. Broyhill (R-Va), a member
of the House Post Office Com-
mittee and a wealthy real estate
contractor of suburban Arlington,
Va.
Neither Brownell nor Broyhill
would say who was involved in the
alleged bribe offer,' a $500 cam-
paign contribution, nor when it was
made.
The heads of two AFL unions
which have been active in efforts
to obtain a pay raise for postal
workers called the bribe report
"preposterous" and "impossible to
believe."
The postal workers unions op-
* posed the job reclassification plan
on the ground it would transfer
authority over pay rates from Con-
gress to the postmaster general.
Postmaster General Summerfield
contended the present system is
antiquated and uneconomical.
France Lauds
U Graduate
An Ann Arbor woman and a
graduate of the University has been
made a member of the Order of
the Legion of Honor, France's Am-
bassador Henri Bonnet has an-
nounced.
She is Prof. Elizabeth R. Sunder-
land, of Duke University, t h e
daughter of University Law School
Prof.-Emeritus and Mrs. Edson R.
Sunderland.
The French Ambassador said the
high honor was awarded Prof.
Sunderland for her research and
publications dealing with medieval
French architecture.
Dr. Sunderland graduated. from
the University in 1931 with a
bachelor's degree. She went on for
her doctorate at Harvard, getting
it in 1938. Now ranked as an as-
sociate professor of art at Duke.
',M Alumnus'
Cops Award
The Michigan Alumnus maga-
zine, official publication of the
University of Michigan Alumni As-
sociation has been hono;ed for sig-
nificant editorial achievement in
the field of alumni publishing.
The Alumnus was named as one
of the "Top Ten" alumni maga-
zines in the United States by judg-
es of the 1954 Alumni Magazine
Contest sponsored by the Ameri-
can Alumni Council. It also was

PRIVATE MEETING HELD:
Geneva Conference Still
Stopped on Indo-China
GENEVA (AP)-East-West negotiators met for three hours Friday
in hard bargaining for an Indo-China armistice but made no progress.
French Premier Pierre Mendes-France, Soviet Foreign Minister
V. M. Moltov and British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden conferred.
in private in the showdown stage in an effort to reach an agreement
on a division of Viet Nam.
The delegates were working against a Tuesday deadline when,
Mendes-France has declared, he will resign if he has not achieved
cease-fire.
Documents putting down in black and white French proposals,
which were reported to divide

McCarthy
Oust Attempt
Abandoned
Flanders To Ask
Formal Censure
WASHINGTON () - Sen. Flan-
ders (R-Vt) announced Friday
night he will abandon his attempt
to oust Sen. McCarthy from his
committee chairmanships and seek
instead to have the Wisconsin Re-
publican formally censured for
conduct which "tends to bring the
Senate into disrepute."
Meanwhile McCarthy yielded to
pressure from the Senate's Repub-
lican leadership and canceled
plans to open an investigation of
alleged Communist infiltration of
defense plants in Boston Saturday.
Flanders issued a statement say-
ing he would introduce his censure
motion in the Senate next Tuesday
and that it will "permit a clearcut
vote on McCarthyism."
Against Tradition
The resolution condemns McCar-
thy's conduct as chairman of the
Senate Permanent Subcommittee
on Investigations as "unbecoming
a member of the United States
Senate" and "contrary to senator-
ial traditions."
A test on the ouster resolution
had been scheduled for Tuesday,
when the 73-year-old Vermont sen-
ator planned to get it disinterred
from the Senate Rules Committee,
where it has reposed since June
15. The Senate Republican Policy
Committee has turned thumbs
down on this move, however.
Flanders said he has asked Sen.
Knowland of California, the ma-
jority leader, what he thought
about an alternate censure motion
but that Knowland hasn't told him
yet.
Confusion of Issues
In his statement, Flanders said
he decided on the switch in tactics
to avoid "confusion over the is-
sue" at stake, because some sena-
tors disliked his idea of stripping
a senator of chairmanships ob-
tained through seniority.
"When I introduced my resolu-
tion concerning the junior senator
from Wbiconsin, my purpose was
to give the Senate the opportunity
to repudiate the conduct of Mr.
McCarthy who has brought dis-
honor and disrepute upon the Sen-
ate of the United States," he said.
Four Removed
At Monmouth;
Two Cleared
WASHINGTON (R) - The Army
announced Friday that four civil-
ians have been removed from their
posts in the Ft. Monmouth, N.J.,
radar laboratories as security risks
and two others cleared and rein-
stated.
A spokesman also said there will
be action before the end of the
month on some of the 16 employes
remaining on the security suspen-
sion list.
The two men reinstated, Bernard
Martin and Jerome Rothstein,
were told they had been given full
clearance and that they should re-
port back for duty at the Ft. Mon-
mouth electronics plant.
The names of the four who failed
to satisfy the security review
board in Washington were not an-
nounced. But the dismissed men
were informed that their continued
employment in the highly sensitive
Signal Corps laboratories was "not
clearly consistent with the national
security."

TeMore Suspensions
The Army said that, acting on
its own information and reports
from the FBI, it started the wave
of suspensions among civilians at
Ft. Monmouth last August. The
suspension rate jumped after an
investigation was started by the
Senate Investigations subcommit-
tee headed by Sen. McCarthy (R-
Wis). By the end of last October
the list had reached 35 out of a
total of 6,000 civilians employed at
the signal center.
One man was reinstated several
months ago with full clearance.
Nine were restored to nonsensitive
positions pending further investi-
gations. Three resigned before the
investigations into their cases were
completed, leaving 22 on the sus-
pension list as of June 11.

Ike s
Cuti

*

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- --AP Newsfeature,
MAP TRACES BATTLE OF FRANCE
Cruca World War II Days Recalled

Eisenhower's j
Public Housing
]Plan Changed
WASHINGTON (R)-A split Sen-
ate-House conference committee
Friday approved new housing leg-
islation generally following admin-
istration wishes but rejected Pres-
ident Eisenhower's -public housing
program.
The measure, a m o n g other
things would tighten government
loan insurance provision with the
intention of taking "windfall" prof-
its out of apartment construction.
And it would reduce down pay-
ment requirements on h o m e s
bought with FHA-insured mort-
gages.
Sen. Ives (R-NY), Sen. Spark-
man (D-Ala) and all three House
Democrats on the conference com-
mittee refused to sign the com-
promise legislation, principally be-
cause the majority failed to ap-
prove Eisenhower's public housing
program.

Emergency

Budget

Ly

House Committee

Viet Nam at the 18th Parallel be-
tween the French-supported Viet-
namese and the Red-supported'
Vietminh, were shown to Molotov.
But the Communists were re-
ported holding out for the 14th par-
allel.
The French-drawn partition line
would give the . Vietminh three-
fifths of Viet Nam, including the
rich Red River Delta.
The Communist line would push
the French out of virtually all but
the province of Cochin China,
around Saigon, in the south.
The West will be bolstered Satur-
day by the arrival of U. S. Under-
secretary of State Walter Bedell
Smith from Washington. He was
en route to the conference Friday
night.
As a result of Molotov's stone-
wall opposition the hopes for a
ceasefire before Tuesday's dead-
line took a nosedive.
Western diplomats still hoped
the Communists would give ground
at the last minute, but the feeling
of optimism which had pervaded
the conference for several days
was evaporating.J

By The Associated Press 3
Ten years ago, the Allies had the gap in Nazi Field Marshal Er-
only a tiny, precarious foothold in win Rommel's lines in a lightning
Hitler's Fortress Europe. thrust.
For more than a month expe- The Brittany Peninsula was cut
ditionary forces under Gen. Dwight Off. Patton's tanks raced toward
D. Eisenhower had been penned the railroad and highway main-
up in Normandy, striving desper- Rennes, captured it and spun down
ately for room in which to man- lies to Paris.
euver. The entire Allied front began to
American forces under Lt. Gen. wheel eastward, pivoting on Caen.
Omar N. Bradley were able to The Germans elected to fight it
swing westward up the Contentin out instead of retreating to the
Peninsula and take Cherbourg Seine. They fought stubbornly, too,
from the rear June 27, thus se- and one large pocket he'd its po-
curing a vital port for the build- sition in the Argentan-Falaise gap
up of supplies. This could hardly until Aug. 19.
have succeeded, however, without The Allies, however, with their
the help of British and Canadians, overwhelming air coverage, ;ould
who drew the bitter assignment of not be stopped. Aided by the
protecting the American's rear. On French Forces of the Interior, the
July 9 shey moved ahead to oc- underground army which went in-
cupy Caen. eastern anchor of the to action behind the German lines
beachhead. on D-day, they drove relentlessly
As men and material poured in towards the Seine.
through Cherbourg, ; the Allies By Aug. 21 they had bridge-
slugged it out with the Wehrmacht heads over France's historic river
in what became known as the Bat- both above and below Paris. To
tle of the Hedge Rows. The fight- the French Second Armored Di-
ing was savage but advances oiten vision went the honor of entering
were only a few yards a day. the capital on Aug. 25.
St. Lo Land on Coast
As reinforcements stacked up, Meanwhile, on Aug. 15, French
Eisenhower began probing the Ger- and American forces had landed
man line for weak spots. In the at several points on the French
middle of July, he began inten- j Mediterranean coast. They ad-
sive artillery preparation. On July vanced rapidly, liberated Marseil-
26 came the famous St. Lo break- les and Toulon and by early Sep-
through by Lt. Gen. George S. Pat- tember were far up the Rhone
ton's U.S. 3rd Army. and Saone valleys.
The Allies were off to the races. With the northern Allied armies
Ten months later World War II rushing eastward, vast numbers of
in Europe was over, the German German troops in southwestern
war machine ground to bits be- France were in a desperate situ-j
tween the British, Canadians, Am- ation. They began rushing for
ericans and French ii the west Germany through the gap remain-
and the Russians in the east. ing in the Dijon area, but on Sept.
Break-Through 1.1 French troops from the south
The St. Lo breakthrough was joined with American troops from
like pulling a cork from a bottle. the north near Dijon, and the Ger-
Allied military might, penned up mans in southwestern France were
for a month in the narrow Nor- trapped. Many surrendered. 0th-
mandy beachhead, burst through ers had to be fought down.

Now the country became rough-
er-and there was a man-made
barrier as well. This was the Sieg-
fried Line, a shrewdly placed string
of pillboxes, tanktraps and mine-
fields stretching from Switzerland
to the Netherlands. Artillery pre-
paration, followed by infantry ad-
vances of perhaps half a mile a
day on good days, became the or-
der.
Desperate efforts were made to
flank the Siegfried Line (West
Wall). An airborne British-Am-
erican-Polish-Dutch army was
dropped in Holland to carve out
bridgeheads over the Rhine, but it
failed when it could not hold the
Duton city of Arnhem.
In ap effort to crack the line
before winter set in, Gen. Eisen-
hower loosed a general offensive
in mid-November. Patton drove
the Germans ou; of the series of
fortifications around Metz, and
the French took Belfort, but the
Germans did not break. The ad-
vance Mowed.
Then, out of nowhere, on Dee.
17 came a furious counteroffen-
sive by the Germans through the
Ardennes Forest-toe famous Bat-
tle of tl'e Bulge. The American 1st
Army was almost chopped to bits
by the 15 divisions ana astonishing
number of planes that German
Field Marshal Kazl Gtrd von RYn-
stedt ha i scraped up from the
bottom of the German reserve bar-
rel.
Low water mark for the Allies
came Dec. 26, with the bulge 60
miles deep. Next day Patton's
tanks had begun to take the steam
out of the German drive, and by
the first of 1945 the Allies had the
initiative again. As January end-
ed, the Allies were back in posi-
tion along the Siegfried line. The
final drive began the following
spring.

Eisenhower
Dealt Hard
Fiscal Slap
Largest Chop-Off
In Recent Years
WASHINGTON (M - The House
Appropriations Committee Friday
dealt President Eisenhower the
hardest fiscal slap of his adminis-
tration as it chopped 39 per cent
from a $1,900,000,000 emergency
budget.
The GOP-dominated commitee
recommended that the House pro-
vide only $1,194,188,079 of the $1,-
959,958,267 the President had re-
quested for supplemental financing
of imscellaneous federal activities.
The $765,770,188 reduction was
the biggest, percentagewise, in re-
cent years and the House was ex-
pected to sustain most of it when
it considers the committee's action
next week.
Committee Chairman Taber (R-
NY), commented, "We didn't cut
anything that shouldn't have been
cut."
Where They Come
The committee's deepest slashes
were in funds sought for ship con-
struiction, military public works,
hospital construction and civil de-
fense.
The Air Force bore the brunt of
the cuts in construction funds. It
wanted $945,997,000 in new money
and was given $484,080,000. The
Navy was allotted $73,517,000 of the
$140,000,000 it requested. The Army
got the entire $503,000 it sought; it
had planned to use available funds
for most of its construction pro-
gram this year.
The Civil Defense Admknistra-
tion, which wanted $85,750,000 in
new funds, was given $44,025,000.
The biggest cut was in funds to
stockpile emergency supplies and
equipment. The agency asked for
$60,000,000 for this purpose and
was given $25,000,000, all of it to
be used for medical supplies and
equipment.
The entire $35,000,000 requested
by the President for grants to
states for hospital construction
under a recently-expanded pro-
gram was disallowed. The money
would have been used to build
specialized facilities for treatment
of diseases. The committee said
present plans for the program
were "very vague."
'U' Thoracic
Surgeon Dies
Yesterday
Dr. John Alexander, world-re-
knowned specialist in thoracic sur-
gery and professor at the Univer-
sity, died yesterday at University
Hospital.
He was 63 years old.
A medical trail-blazer in the
field of thoracic surgery, Dr. Alex-
ander was famous for his work
with tuberculosis patients. He was
the man who treated Sen. Arthur
Vandenberg in the late senator's
final months.
A colleague and chairman of the
deceased physician's department
said yesterday: "American surgery
has lost one of its great personali-
ties in the death of Dr. John Alex-
ander."
Dr. Frederick A. Coller, profes-
sor of surgery and head of Alexan-
der's department went on:
"He was a pioneer in developing
surgery of the chest, and he led
the way in the surgical treatment
of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was
a crusader as well as a great

surgeon in the fight against this
disease. One cannot estimate the
good that has come to the sick
from his efforts in this field. He
was a truly great teacher and hun-
dreds of his disciples now project
his example and learning over the
whole world.
"We in the department of surgery
will sorely miss the inspiration
and stimulation of his enthusiastic
teaching, his great professional
skills ,and his staunch and un-
derstanding personality.

CONCERT COMEDIAN:
Russell To Appear
Monday Night at Hill

By SUE GARFIELD
In conjunction with the summer
program "Women in the World of
Man," Anna Russell, international
concert comedienne, will make her
first Detroit area appearance at
8:30 p.m. Monday in Hill Auditor-
ium,
Tickets for the performance,
which are priced at $1.50, $1 and
50 cents, may still be purchased at
the Hill Auditorium box office.
Originally a student of serious
music, Miss Russell studied at the
Royal College of Music in her na-
tive London, specializing in voice,
piano, composition and cello.
Accidental Career
She turned to her present field
upon discovering the audience re-
action to such accidents as break-
ing up a presentation of "Cavaller-
ia Rusticana" by sliding into andl
knocking down the prop church at
the back of the stage.
Miss Russell returned to opera

SPEECH CONFERENCE: -
Authorities Will Speak At Rackham

By MERLE MAYERSTEIN

ANNA RUSSELL
The young artist composes all
musical scores for her shows, in-
cluding that for each member of
the involved orchestra.

i
1
_!
f

Three authorities in their respec-
Russian W eather tivefields will speak this morning
,~ at Rackham Amphitheatre as the
Stations in Arctic Department of Speech concludes
its annual Summer Speech Con-

speaker will be Dr. Karl R. Wal-
lace of the University of Illinois
who will discuss "Rhetoric and
Politics."
The two day meeting began

with "The Basic Nature of Oral
Interpretation."
Beginning the afternoon session
was a discussion by Mrs. Kathleen
N. Lardie on "Education Televi-
sion in Detroit." Next on the pro-

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