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June 22, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 1954

Singapore's Chinese inhabitants The Dominican Republic has
now show a preference for plastic boosted coffee export taxes 17 per
furniture. cent.
WELCOM E
to all Summer Studnts
.from...
RAMSAY PRINTERS
FOR ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
119 East Liberty4
li

ROTC Feature
Air Force ROTC's detachment at
the University is featured in the
June issue of "The Air Force
Reservist," a magazine printed
monthly for distribution to mem-
bers of the AF Reserve and Air
National Guard not in active mili-
tary service.
The featured story in the June
issue is by William Bender, Jr.,
script editor of the University
Broadcasting Service, who is also
an AF reserve captain.
Chairman of the Department of
Air Science and Tactics at the
University is Prod. W. L. Todd,
while the Commandant of the Ca-
dets is Prof. M. A. Davis.t

Schedule

for

New

WELCOME, STUDENTS

I

while
shQpping.

STAY COOL..i our
Cff4~t/Qw~ov4

r"
Dresses and Suits
at main shop
on Forest
just off South U.

From tiny 9 s to tall
40's - not so tall
121/2 to 241/2.
Cotton dresses for
all summer occa.
sions from class to
dance time .«.
priced from
8.95 to 29.95
budget cottons 5.95

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-Daily-Mari Crozier
WOMEN'S NEW POOL-The recently finished new Women's
Athletic Association pool, situated on the corner of Forest and
North University across from WAB, is open for summer en-
joyment.
WAA Offers Many Activities
To Summer Session Coeds

By MARY HELLTHALER
Coeds at the University for the
summer session will be fortunate
in being among the first to use
the new women's swimming pool.
The pool was opened in March
of this year and is opposite the
Women's Athletic Building on the
corner of North University and
Forest. It is a long, modern
brick building with the latest fa-
cilities for both participants and
spectators.
Time has been set aside for
recreational and co-recreational
swimming to alleviate the sum-
mer's heat.
Summer Hours
Coeds may swim from 5:20 to
6:15 p.m. every Monday through
Thursday, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Fri-
days, 7 to 9 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday.
Friday evenings will be open to
families from 7 to 9 p.m., while
coeds may bring their dates to
the pool from 7 to 9 p.m. Satur-
days and 3 to 5 p.m. Sundays.
A grandstand with a seating
capacity of 700 and stage lighting
both above and below, equips the
pool for physical education class-
es and Michifish water shows,
held during the regular year.
The pool itself is larger than
either the Union Pool or the In-
tramural Building Pool. It meas-
ures 75 by 44 feet and has six
lanes. There is a 10 foot depth att
the diving end and three and one7
half foot depth in the non-swim-t
mers end.
It also features three-foot and
ten-foot diving boards, with spot-
lights focused on them. The 22-
foot ceiling provides plenty of
room for high diving.
Underwater Scene
Underwater observation ports j
allow behind-the-scene views of
water shows and the public ad-
dress system can be heard above m
and below the water line. on
A 15-foot panel in the instruc- da
tor's office houses the lighting T
and sound controls. Equipment Le
such as lines for marking racing I
lines and an aluminum canoe for se
life-saving classes are stored near Ju
the pool. M
The walls of the two-story pool Bi
building are only temporary to Ju
allow for the future building pro- "T
gram, including an entirely new gu
Women's Athletic Plant.k
The pool is constructed so that $6
the water level is even with the
first floor, while the lower part $1
of the water is below the ground
floor. The entire swimming area
is illuminated by 16 under-water $1
lights and spotlights in the ceil- M
ing.1
There is also an aquaradio for ia
underwater music and it is wired Ti
for television, go
Swimmers Guide
Students are requested to bring1
their own bathing suits and caps, ye
as only a few cotton suits are sp
available in comparison to the fo
number that use the pool. Swim- to
mers are to go to the main desk pa
in the lobby, where they will be re
directed to the locker rooms. of

Pool

HIGH DIVE-Members of the Michifish and speed swimming
teams are "keeping cool" in the new Women's swimming pool.
The pool is open to coeds, in addition to family and co-recrea-
tional nights.
)peech Department
r0 Give Four Plays

a
a

Announced.

'

" ".
.5
.
*.
1 .
5,

Pretty recipes
fun - in - the -

for
sun

are our separates.
at our
CAMPUS TOGGERY
at 1111 South U.
near the Diag
COOL

Women's Athletic Association,
to which every coed at the Uni-
versity automatically becomes a
member, is responsible for many
interesting activities on campus.
These activities are planned and
carried out by members of the
WAA executive board, who also
determine matters of policy for
the WAA and discuss problems of
the sports, clubs, which function
on a larger scale during the reg-
ular semester.
WAA Board
The Board, under the leadership
of President Margaret Lord, is
made up of executive members and
club managers, including those of
fencing, basketball, rifle, tennis,
bowling, golf, field hockey, Michi-
fish, camp counselors and speed
swimming.
It also includes heads of co-rec-
reational clubs, including riding,
ice-skating, modern dance, bal-
let and badminton.
Although the actual clubs do
not function during the summer
session, the seasonal sports which
Lecture Series
"Woman in the World of
Man," discussion topic for the
University Summer Lecture
Series, is the title of the first
lecture, to be given by Presi-
dent Harlan H. Hatcher at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. No ad-
mission will be charged.

they represent are offered to Uni-
versity students.
Both elementary and interme-
diate classes in many different I
sports are being offered for coeds'
summer enjoyment by the Wom-
en's Department of Physical Ed-
ucation.
Summer Activities
Those activities available free
of charge include tennis, golf, ar-
chery, riding badminton and mod-
ern dance. There is also a course
in posture, figure and carriage of-
fered.
Swimming classes of all kinds,
including elementary, intermedi-
ate and synchronized, are open to
all interested women. Equipment
for all classes, which take place
every afternoon, is provided.
Tournaments in golf and ten-
nis are slated for those coeds who
enjoy competing with others in
sports events. The tennis tourna-
ment will be held July 8, with
the preliminary games being
played next week.
Co-recreation

COOL... COOL... COOL... COOL

Season tickets for the Depart-
ent of Speech summer plays are
sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
wily at the Lydia Mendelssohn
heater box office, Michigan
ague.
Included in the special summer
ries are Shakespeare's "Hamlet,"
ly 5-10; , Mary Chase's "Mrs.
cThing," July 21-24; Richard
rinsley Sheridan's "The Critic,"
ly 28-31 and Mozart's opera,
the Marriage of Figaro," Au-
ist 5, 6, 7 and 9.
Season tickets are priced at
.00, $4.75 and $3.25, while the
dividual performances are $1.75,
.40 and $1 for "Hamlet" and
The Marriage of Figaro," and
.50, $1.10 and 75 cents for "Mrs.
cThing" and "The Critic."
All performances are in the Lyd-
Mendelssohn Theatre at 8 p.m.
ckets for individual plays will
on sale Monday, June 28.
"Hamlet"
B. Iden Payne, who for eight
ars was director of the Shake-
eare Memorial Theatre, Strat-
rd-on-Avon and is guest direc-
r in the University's speech de-
artment for the summer, will di-
ct the six special performances
"Hamlet."
The part of the First Gravedig-
r will be played by Whitford
ane, eminet Shakespearean ac-
r and long-time "favorite" of
mnmer theatre audiences. Since
e turn of the century Kane has
ayed the role of the First Grave-
gger with more than 20 Hamlets
the last 50 years.
"Mrs. McThing"
Mary Chase's fantasy and re-
nt Broadway hit, "Mrs. Mc-
hing" will be presented as part
the University's summer lecture
ries, entitled "Woman in the
Vorld of Man."

"The Critic"
B. Iden Payne will play his fa-
mous role of Mr. Puff in Richard
Brinsley Sheridan's 18th century
rehearsal farce, "The Critic" or
a "Tragedy Rehearsed." It will be
given under the direction of Wil-
liam P. Halstead of the speech
department.
The play ridicules tragedy as
seen on the Elizabethan stage in
1779, satirizing drama in the
theatre.
"The Marriage of Figaro"
Concluding the season, "Mo-
zart's opera, "The Marriage of
Figaro," will be staged under the
direction of Valentine Windt of
the speech department and Josef
Blatt of the School of Music, con-
ducting the opera orchestra in the
final production.
"The Marriage of Figaro" re-
mains as one of the masterpieces
of comedy in music. Set in Spain,
the plot deals with the antics and
confused love life of Figaro, bar-
ber to the Count Almavivia, the
Count himself and many others.
Jack E. Bender and Phyllis
Pletcher of the Department of
Speech will design and supervise
the execution of the scenery and
costumes. Esther Pease of the
Women's Physical Education De-
partment will direct the choreog-
raphy for "The Critic" and "The
Marriage of Figaro."
Business manager of the sum-
mer play productions is Bruce
Nary of the speech department.
Conference Head
L. Clayton Hill, University pro-
fessor of industrial relations, is in
Pasadenda, Calif., until July 3,
when he will serve as one of the
conference leaders of the Indus-
trial Relations Section at the Cal-
ifornia Institute of Technology.

tI

I _______________________________________________________________Ewa_

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ON EVERY BEACH-
They'll be wearing
OF CA LEFOR N A -
SWIM SUITS
You've seen swim suits that depend
on you to give them curves-but
COLE makes them with curves pre-
sculptured to slip over you like a beau-
tiful shell-with fabulous up-lift bras
and slim princess lines.
FINE COTTONS-Fade resistant ny-
lon lastex . . black, navy, white, and
many sunny colors , , . sizes 10-18
. . , small-medium-large.
to 00

Co-recreation is provided in the
fields of swimming, golf and ten-
nis, and picnic equipment is
available at the Women's Ath-
letic Building to help "beat the
heat."
Those students interested in
participating in classes or tourna-
ments may apply in office 15 at
Barber Gymnasium from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. any day.

Women's Page
Anyone interested in work-
-ing on the Women's Staff of
The Daily for the Summer Ses-
sion should contact Sue Gar-
field at NO-23241.

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Such coot, comc
fun to wear..

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\

WOVEN LEATHER with CREPE
SOLES and FOAM INSOLES
...as full of spring as a shoe can be!
Such light, buoyant, happy-go-easy traveling
... so durable for country romps! vacation
jaunts! for slippery boat decks, too...
soles are skid-proof! In new

of ease and good looks. Two concealed platforms of "float weight" cork cushion every
step; air vents inside keep the shoe cool and fresh; the insole is treated with chioro.

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I

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