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July 13, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-13

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TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IMAGE TTMEW'

TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAt~U! TWUIrU

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Leagues Clash in 21st Al-Star ame in Cic

veland

« ---

Stengal Names Whitey Ford'
As Surprise Lead Pitcher

The Lineup

THE WALLS HAVE EARS:
Plot Thickens in Dallas Franchise Switch

Alston Banks on Robin Roberts
Favored National Loop's Four

to Continue
Game Skein

0----

CLEVELAND (M - Whitey Ford,
25-year-old New York Yankee left-
hander, is Manager Casey Sten-
gel's surprise pitching choice to
I start against Philadelphia's Robin
Roberts in Tuesday's 21ts All-Star
Baseball Game at Municipel Sta-
dium.
Seeking to break a .four-game
American League losing streak;
Stengel drew on his own staff to
face the favored National Leaguers
~.who pack three lefthanded slug-
gers - Cincinnati's Ted Kluszew-
ski, Brooklyn's Duke Snider and
St. Louis' Stan Musial - in their
starting lineup.
Possible Record
with a break from the weather-
man who predicts a partly cloudy
day with the thermometer soaring
to the middle 90s, the All-Star at-
*tendance record of 69,812, set at
Cleveland in 1935, might be broken.
' Game time is 11:30 a.m. CST
with network radio (Mutual) and
television (NBC and Mutual) cov-
erage. In case of rain, the game
will be played at 6 p.m. CST Tues-
day night.
The game receipts plus the $110,-
..i* radio - TV money go into the
central fund out of which the play-
er pensions are paid.
Although the Americans still hold
a 12-8 edge in the series, the Na-
tionals' home run power makes
Manager Walter Alston's team an
8 to 5 choice.
Injuries Hurt
Both 'clubs are in tough shape
..for pitching after Sunday's heavy
doubleheader firing and injuries
that cost the Americans the serv-
k ices of New York'-s Allie Reynolds
and Cleveland's Mike Garcia, two
of the best..
Stengel admits he planned to use
Garcia until he got word Sunday
that he was unable to pitch for his
own team againstt he' White Sox.
He also expected to use Chicago's
Virgil Trucks but may not work
him because he pitched a tiring
nine-inning game Sunday.
'h' "I wanted a lefty to get after
their lefthanders," Stengel said,
explaining his choice of Ford who
Some Pitch
HAMMOND, Ind. () - Don
* Dittrich, 12 - year - old Little
League baseball pitcher, has a
bad break to blame' for failing
to hurl a no-hit game.
With two out in the last inn-
ing, Dittrich needed only to get
the last batter. But on his first
pitch Dittrich grabbed his right
arm and winced with pain.
He had broken his arm be-
tween the shoulder and elbow.
has been erratic in compiling a
spotty 7-6 record.
Spartan Stalwart
Alston followd the book in nam-
ing Roberts (11-8), a 27-year-old
righthander who started three of
the last four National League vic-
tories since 1950. No club, in-
cidentally, ever has won five in a
row.
Stengel won't name a second or
third pitcher until Tuesday. From
his conversation, you get the idea

he is thinking of Washington's Bob
Porterfield or Chicago's Sandy
Consuegra (Garcia's replacement)
for the middle three innings. That
would give him well-rested Bob
Keegan of Chicago or Dean Stone
of Washington, his other lefty, to
finish up. Casey also will have
available Baltimore's Bob Turley,
Cleveland's Bob L e m o n and
Trucks, all of whom pitched Sun-
day.
Alston Undecided
After Roberts, Alston is unde-
cided. He probably will shift to a
lefthander, Johnny Antonelli of
New York, for the middle three.
That would leave lefthander War-
ren Spahn of Milwaukee and right-
handers Carl Erskine of Brooklyn,
Mary Grissom of New York and
Milwaukee's Gene Conley and Jim
Wilson. Five of the Nationals'

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Gran Hamner ,Philadelphia, 2b,
.323
Al Dark, New York, ss, 293
Duke Snider, Brooklyn, of .367
Stan Musial, St. Louis, rf, .331
Ted Klusszewski, Cincinnati,
lb, .313
Ray Jablonski, St. Louis, 3b
.322
Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn, if,
.321-
Roy Campanella, Brooklyn, C,
.215
Robin Roberts, Philadelphia, P,
11-8

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Minnie Minoso, Chicago, LF,
.313
Bobby Avila, Cleveland, 2B, .341
Mickey Mantle, New York, CF,
.316
Yogi Berra, New York, C. 291
Al Rosen, Cleveland, 1B, .313
Ray Boone, Detroit, 3B, .303
Hank Bauer, New York, RF,
.306
Chico Oarrasquel, Chicago, SS,
.263
Whitey Ford, New York, P, 7-6

Patterson TKO's Royer
In Middleweight Fight

WILLIE MAYS
..starts on bench

NEW YORK (i - Floyd Patter-
son, former Olympic middleweight
champion, stopped Jacques Royer
of France Monday night by a tech-
nical knockout when the latter was
not permitted to come out for the
eighth and final round because of
a badly cut right eye at St. Nich-
olas Arena.
Royer, who weighed 166 to Patt-
erson's 164 , was o u t c l a s s e d
through most of the fight. He suf-
fered cuts over the left eye and the
top of his forehead.
" The Frenchman seemed to have
no defense against Paterson's rights
to the head. As early as the first
round Royer was cut over his left
eye.
In this session, Patterson, in
spite of inflicting a decisive beat-
ing to Royer, was caught with a
left hook to the body and knocked
down for a count of six before the
bell ended the round.
The knockdown suffered by Patt-
erson was his first in 15 profes-
sional bouts.
In the fourth round Patterson
switched his attack 'to the body
and continued the offensive. Roy-
er's feeble attempts to catch the
victor with any sort of a punishing
blow were useless except for one
occasion early in the fifth round
when he caught Patterson with a
hard right hand lead.
From the fifth on Patterson
paced himself and proceeded in

workmanlike fashion to punish
Royer with combinations to the
head and body.
* * *
BOSTON (RI - Powerful Tony
DeMarco, 141 , of Boston floored
George Araujo, 138, of Providence,
R.I., twice and had him helpless
with a series of combination
punches to score a technical knock-
out at 58 seconds of the fifth round
Monday night in a scheduled 10-
rounder at Fenway Park.
Demarco sent Araujo to the can-
vas for an eight count with a
vicious right to the jaw and then
1777iI slty
Mary Wall-
Takes Lead
In Golf. Play
DETROIT (R) - Mary Agnes
Wall of Menominee fired a re-
markable 74 Monday to lead a
record field or 171 entrants in the
annual Women's State Amateur
Championship.
It was one of the lowest com-
petitive rounds ever recorded in
Michigan women's golf.
The 38-36--74 was four strokes
under par at Detroit P*olf Club
and only three over men's par. It
equaled the course record set by
Sally Sessions in 1948.
Second behind Miss Wall in the
qualifying round was Irene Bretz-
laff of Detroit with 37-39-76. Pat
Devany of Grosse Ile was third
with 39-42--81.
Scores ranging up into the 90's
were believed good enough to qual-
ify for match play which starts
Tuesday.
Mrs. J. L. Seripsma of Grand
Rapids shot 44-46-90.

Big League
Diamondmen
FormGroup
Players Hire ,
Legal Advisor
CLEVELAND (R - Big league
baseball players Monday organized
formally into a group known as
the Major League Baseball Play-
ers' Assn. and retained a lawyer
at a reported fixed salary of
$30,000 annually.
The player representatives from
the American and National League
16 clubs ,announced that J. Norman
Lewis of New York, who had been
representing the players, was given
the formal blessing by the players
as their attorney.
Thegroup will elect player re-
presentatives from each of the 16
clubs beginning in July 1955, and
they in turn will elect a league
representative from each loop.,
Lewis, in a news conference, de-
nied that the player action could
be construed as the forming of a
union. It was pointed out that no
dues will be paid into the associa-
tion. Previously, the player re-
presentatives group, which was
formed informally in 1946, pre-
ferred to be known as a "players'
fraternity."

DALLAS (R--Silence, so far as
the general public is concerned,
fell Monday over the project to
bring major league baseball to
Dallas.
E. E. (Buddy) Fogelson, Dallas
oil man and spokesman for a
group interested in the venture, is-
sued a statement saying he would
make no more public statements.
"In my opinion, the project to
bring major league baseball to
Dallas and Texas became as mat-
ter of public knowledge too soon,"
his statement said. "We have
placed ourselves in an unfavorable
trading position. We have created
competition, which was otherwise
unnecessary, by disclosing our
plans."
Pogelson said he issued his state-
ment after talking by telephone
Monday with George Trautman,
president of the National Assn. of
Professional Baseball Leagues,
Columbus, Ohio.
"In my conversation with him
he informed me that, in his opin-
ion, the interests of baseball as a
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11

whole would best be served if there
is no further publicity regarding
the trade for a major league base-
ball team, at least until the pres-
ent baseball season is over," Fo-
gelson said.
He added:
"However, the effort to bring
major league baseball to Dallas
and Texas will be pursued en-
thusiastically and relentlessly "
The other leader in the local
drive, Dick Burnett, owner of the
Dallas Eagles of the Texas
Louis Varney, amateur radio en-
thusiast of Chelmsford, England,
picked up a call for aid, from Con-
stantine, Algeria.

League, already had been warned
to silence by Trautman. Six Texas
League clubs had complained to
Trautman that the Dallas owner's
agitation for a major league fran-
chise in Dallas was damaging and
detrimental to the Texas League.
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WHITEY FORD
. .. Casey's choice

seven pitchers worked Sunday,
Spahn pitched Saturday and An-
tonelli Friday.
The problem of "where to play
Willie Mays" will face Alston af-
ter three innings. He said he
would remove Jackie Robinsonof
Brooklyn from left field after three.
He might shift Snider to right and
play Musial in left, leaving center-
field open for the sensational New
York outfielder who leads both
majors - and Babe Ruth's record
pace - with 31 home runs. Or he
might play Mays in left.
Campy Better
Roy Campanella, the Brooklyn
catcher who has been behind the
plate for 43 consecutive All-Star
innings, got a go-ahead from his
doctor Monday in Brooklyn. The
doctor reassured Campy Athat a
recent numbness in his fingers,
following an operation, was only a
natural reaction and he soon would
be as good as ever.
Ted Williams, the Boston Red
Sox's fabulous slugger, will be in
the American lineup as soon as
three innings are finished. Sten-
gel isn't sure just how he'll juggle
his lineup.
The 16 starters, exclusive of
pitchers, were named by the votes
of 4,272,470 fans and must play at
least three innings. Pitchers were
selected by the managers along
with the other members of the 25-
man squads. No pitcher can work
more than three innings, unless
the game goes overtime.

Ltons Sign
Charlie Ane
To Contract

Ladies
Blended Hair
Styling

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Air Conditioned
6 Experts to serve you

DETROIT (P)-One signed 1954
contract by 6-foot-2, 260-pound
lineman Charlie Ane brought the
National Football League champi-
on Detroit Lions a one-man gang
Monday.
The former University of South-
ern California line star is expected
to take over a regular spot on the
Lions' offensive team at guard or
center.
Kerbaway announced also that
the Lions signed free agent Joe
Selaskey. Selaskey, a 6-foot, 20-
year-old 220-pounder, will be tried
as a center. He played at Detroit
Western High School in 1952. Se-
leskey, and 26 other rookies, will
report to the Lions Ypsilanti
training camp July 21.

Since
1908

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