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June 26, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE lOO R

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_. SATURDAY, E 26, 054

PAGE FOtR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1~)54

MARSHALL ISLANDERS PROTEST:
UN Will Discuss Atomic Testing Precautions

.>

By FRANCIS W. CARPENTER
Associated Press Writer
For the first time next month,
the United States will discuss withj
other nations some of the pre-
cautions taken at its supersecret
atomic proving grounds in the Pa-
cific.
The explanation will come in the
United Nations in answer to pro-
tests by the Marshall Islanders
about radioactive injuries to their
people from the March 1 hydrogen
blast. A full review is scheduled
to start July 6 before the Petitions
Committee of the Trusteeship Coun-
cil. Russia and India, both com-
mittee members and already criti-
cal of U.S. atomic policy, are ex-
pected to exploit the protest for
propaganda purposes and call for
a ban on further atomic and hydro-
gen tests until world controls can
be established.
The United States is not a mem-
ber of the petitions committee. It
will take part in the debate but it
will have no vote in committee
recommendations.
The United States is, however,
a member of the Trusteeship Coun-
cil and it will have a vote there
when the council takes up the
petitions committee report.
Japan is concerned too. Japanese
fisherrpen, in a supposedly safe
'area, were injured by radioactivity
from the March 1 test. Japan is not
a member of the U.N. but main-
tains a permanent observer, who
could speak if invited.
PETITION NOT U.S. PROTEST
The Marshall Islanders do not
intend to play into the Russian
$250.00 EASY
CAMPUS AGENCY
We need a campus agent to
sell nationally advertised draw-'
ing instrument sets and slide
rules to entering engineering
freshmen this fall. Tremendous
profits. Free posters and bro-
chures. No investment required.
Write: Empire Engineering.,
P. 0. Box 114, Canal St.,
NYC 13, N.Y.

________________________________________________ U

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Revolution
Rare Book
A Clements
The only known copy of a book$
which throws a sidelight on one:
of the very minor results of the
American Revolution has been ac-
quired by the Clements Library at
the University.
Titled "Twenty Four Country
Dances As Danced by the British
During the Winter Quarters at
Philadelphia, New York and
Charleston. Collected by Mr. Can-
telo, Musician at Bath, Where
They Are Now Dancing for the
First Time in Britain," the book
was published in 1785 in London.
British officers had learned the
dances while mingling with Tor-
ies and introduced them in their
own society when they returned
home.
The collector. Mr. Cantelo, had
never been to America but
thought he might make some
money by publishing both the
songs and the directions for the
caller for the dances, which in-
clude square, reels and polkas.
An average of about 27,000 elec-
tric-power customers were gained
each week during 1953 by the na-
tion's utility companies. Nearly
16,000,000 customers have been
added since World War II until
now 98 per cent of all American
homes have electricity.

9

.+ - - -!- M-/

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Hillel Plans Wide Variety
Of Activities for Summer

* Ron~'lap People
-mm tiz'ik People

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Pongeiap People Evacuazed
ast A rarch Will dLive Here
Unfil Home Is Safe

Hillel, student religious associa-
tion on campus, has scheduled
numerous activities for summer
session students throughout eight
weeks of classes.
Tomorrow the Married Couples
Group, under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Robert Goldstein, will hold
Single Tickets
To Go on Sale
Single tickets for the University
speech department plays series
will go on sale at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater box office at
10 a.m. Monday.
Included in the series are "Ham-
let" which will run from July 7 to
10; "Mrs. McThing," July 21-24;
"The Critic," July 28-31; and "The
Marriage of Figaro," which will
be performed on August 5, 6, 7,
and 9.
Season tickets are priced at $6,
$4.75 and $3.25 while individual
tickets are $1.75, $1.40 and $1 for
"Hamlet" and "The Marriage of
Figaro," and $1.50, $1.10 and 75
cents for "Mrs. McThing" and
"The Critic."
Curtain time for the perform-
ances which will all be held in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, will
be at 8 p.m.

a picnic at Silver Lake. Members
and guests will leave the Hillel
Building at 11 a.m. to enjoy a day
of swimming, baseball and a pic-
nic dinner at the cost of $1 per
couple. Transportation is avail-
able.
Interim Group
An interim committee on the
summer program is being organ-
ized and will hold its first meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. Monday. All stu-
dents interested in any Hillel ac-
tivity are, welcome to take part.
Prof. William J. Albright of
John Hopkins University, world
renowned archeologist and Bibli-
cal scholar, will lecture to Hillel
interest groups at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 1 in the social hall of
the community center. The pro-
gram is sponsored by the Council
of Churches in Ann Arbor and the
Beth Israel Community Center.
Friday Service
On Fridays, special sabbath sere
vices will be held at 8 p.m. in the
small chapel, followed by the tra-
ditional Kaddush in the library.
Plans for a mixer are underway
as part of the summer session
schedule.
All students are invited to use
the Hillel Building for study,
lounging, music and other sum-
mer activities. The Hillel director,
Dr. Jacobs will see anyone about
problems or just for a social chat.

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THE MOVEMENTS OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDERS FOLLOWING U.S. ATOMIC TEST EXPLOSIONS ARE SHOWN ABOVE

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propaganda game. Their petition
emphasizes that it is not against
the United States as governing
agency for the U.N. trust ter-
ritory. Their appeal is based upon
their plight as hapless refugees of
the atomic age.
Some of the more than 100
petition signers have volunteered
to appear before the U.N. as an
"ally" of the United States, ready
to answer any accusations from
the Soviet Union or any other na-
tion.
Their petition asks that the A
and H-bomb tests be stopped or,

MONTH-END SALE
Begins Monday

if the international situation does
not permit, at least that adequate
safeguards and warnling systems
be set up.
The very isolation of the Mar-
shalls, sealed their fate. These is-
lands, each surrounded by neck-
lace-like beads of coral atolls en-
closing a deep lagoon, are midway
in the vast Pacific Ocean between
Hawaii, New Guinea and Japan.
They came under U.S. control in
World War II when they were
wrested from the Japanese. In
1947 the United States became
their trustee under U.N. authority.
The natives of Bikini and Eni-
wetok were uprooted in 1946-7 to
make way for U.S. atomic ex-
periments.
The Eniwetok people were shift-
ed to Ujelang where they still are,
but the Bikini people have moved
from island to island in a futile
search for a home as nice as
the one they left. The Bikini na-
tives moved to Rongerik in 1946,
Kwajalein in 1948 and Kili in 1949.
They are still on Kili but they are
unhappy because the isolated is-
land is inaccessible many months
of the year because of heavy surf.
This year other Marshall Island-
ers were evicted from their homes.
A shifting wind dropped radioac-
tive ashes from the March 1 H-
bomb test on residents of the
Ronjelap and Utirik atolls. In the
language of the petition, they suf-
fered "lowering of the blood count,
burns, nausea and the falling off
of hair from the head."

Groups of
COATS
SUITS
DRESSES
Sportsweari

VA
rr1

Three days after exposure, a
U.S. destroyer arrived to evacu-
ate the residents-82 from Ronge-
lap and 154 from Utirik. They were
taken to Kwajalein for medical
treatment by a top medical team
flown in from the United States.
In April an official survey party
visited Ronjelap and Utirik atolls.
The party included representatives
of Joint Task Force 7, the U.S.
Pacific Fleet commander in chief,
the Atomic Energy Commission
Rongelap and Utirik.
It was decided the Utirik peo-
ple could return home, with ade-
quate water and food supplies to
be furnished. It was determined,
however, that the Rongelap people
would have to stay away for a
year. They were shifted to 14-acre
Ejit' atoll in the Majuro Islands.
An entirely new village of 27 build-
ings was put up for them.
When the Marshall petition was
made public, Ambassador Henry
Cabot Lodge Jr., chief U.S. dele-
gate to the U.N., immediately de-
clared this country would make
full compensation to the islanders
and guard against any repetition.
Some diplomatic observers ex-
pect the U.N. debate to be rough,
with the Soviet Union and India
throwing propaganda bombs at this
country. The result, however, is
expected to be a council decision
noting the petition and the state-
ment of the United States that
it will take all possible future
safeguards.
Detroit Excursion
Set for Today
University students are invited
to go on an excursion to Green-
field Village, Edison Institute and
a band concert at Belle Isle, spon-
sored by Lane Hall.
The trip is scheduled for 9 a.m.
to midnight today at the cost of
$1 per person plus admission and
food. Students can make reserva-
tions by calling Lane Hall, NO 3-
1511, ext. 2625.
North Carolina estimates its
farmers lost 25 million dollars to
the boll weevil in 1953, one of the
worst years for cotton in the his-
tory of the state.

I

'Ia Off Original Price

RENT
a typewriter
and keep up
with your work
Portables
Standard Office Machines
Wide Carriage Machines
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St.
Since Phones
1908 NO 8-7177
NO 8-9610

Field Recital
To Be Given
Tuesday Night
Mabel Rhead Field, professor
emeritus of piano, will give a pub-
lic recital in conjunction with the
University's special Summer Ses-
sion program, "Woman in the
World of Man," at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall.
The 75-year-old pianist will
play "Toccata in F-sharp minor"
by Bach, "Sonata in E major" by
Scarlatti, "Phantasie, Op. 17" by
Schumann, "Moments Musicals,
Op. 94" by Schubert and "Fantai-
sie, Op. 49" by Chopin.
Due to ill health Mrs. Field
spent her childhood studying un-
der private tutors. In 1905 and
again in 1914 she studied in Eu-
rope and in 1932 enrolled in the
University School of Music. Moritz
Moszkowski, Joseph Lhevinne and
Artur Schnabel were some of the
masters she studied with.
In 1936 Mrs. Field was a visiting
professor at Ginling College in
Nanking, China. She served on
the Music School's executive board
in 1940-41.
Zimmerman
Case Postponed
The municipal court examina-
tions of Floyd C. Zimmerman, 19-
year-old University student char-
ged with attempting to murder his
baby daughter, was postponed yes-
terday to resume again next:
Thursday.
The postponement reportedly
resulted from agreement by both
the defense and prosecution that
they needed additional time to
prepare their cases.
Brigham To Talk
On Modern House
Prof. George B. Brigham, Jr.,
of the school of Architecture and
Design will discuss "What the Mo-
dern House Offers" at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow at the Unitarian
Church, 1917 Washtenaw.
The talk is in conjunction with
a summer series of public lec-
tures sponsored by the Unitarian
Church.
I
Classes Forming
Get an early start toward
a position with a future.?:
SECRETARIAL
ACCOUNTING
BUSINESS MACHINES
PERSONAL TYPING
PRE-COLLEGE
SPEEDWRITING
Co-educational
Placement Service
Cool Classrooms

THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
8:30 P.M.-"Creative Arts in Modern Living"
-a lecture series and public discussions, spon-
sored by the Unitarian Adult Group.
George B. Brigham, School of Architecture,
speaking on "What the Modern House Of-
fers."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry luizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
William S. Baker, Minister to Students
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-Sermon: "The Burden
of Godliness", Mr. Mitchell preaching.
5:30 P.M.-Westminster Student Fellowship pic-
nic at the church.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
June 27: "Christian Science"
5:00 P.M.-Sunday Evening Service
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. and Sunday after-
noons from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service, Sermon: "The Tide
That Binds" Rev. Theodore Schmale preach-
ing.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M. - Sun-
day at 8:00 A.M., 10:00 A.M., 11:30 A.M.
Novena Devotions-Wednesday Evenings-7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Open House in Father Richard Cen-
ter-Friday at 8:00 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Ste.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.-Sermon: "I'll Tell the World"
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild in Pilgrim Hall for
cost supper"
7:00 P.M.-Prof. Preston Slosson speaking on
"Congressional Inquisition" in the Mayflower
Room
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Win. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-"How Old Are You?"
7:30 P.M.-"The Christians Inventory"
Wednesday 7:30 P.M.-Prayer meeting.
A warm welcome awaits you here. Come and hear
the Word of God.

8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion and Student
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer and Sermon
6:00 P.M.-Student Supper Club
7:00 P.M.-"The Church in the News" at Can-
terbury House
8:00 P.M.-Evensong in St. Michaels Chapel
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.--Morning Worship. "A
Man-or a Civil War?"-Dr. Abbey preach-
ing.
9:30 A.M.-Informal discussion group-Pine
Room
3:00 P.M.-Student group meet in the Wesley
Lounge for outing picnic, swimming, volley.
ball-all students welcome.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation. Rooms open.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday-
9:45 A.M.-Bible Study, I John 1.
10:45 A.M.-Service, with celebration of Holy
Communion. Sermon by pastor, "Jesus Christ
Is Lord."
6:00 P.M.-Supper-program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship
Rev. Richard Lehman, guest minister. Ser-
mon "And They Heard Him Gladly". Nursery
for children during service.
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:00 P.M.-Fellowship supper at the Congre-
gational Church
7:00 P.M.-Prof. Preston Slosson: "Congres-
sional Inquisition"
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:30 A.M.-Bible Class-Study of Galatians
10:30 A.M.-Worship Service-Sermon: "The An-
gelic Fallacy"
7:00 P.M.-Lutheran Student Association Meet-
ing. Speaker-Carl Schneuker, Graduate stu-
dent and Missionary from New QGuinea

(.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
AND THE EPISCOPAL
STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Divisimn St.

1:

Sportswear
Sweaters, Skirts, Blouses.
Originally were from 5.95
to 10.95.
The Dresses
Beautiful purse silk shan-
tungs-crepes, failles. All
good for Fall wear. Orig-
inally were from 16.95 to
49.95.
The Coats and
Suits
all 100% Fine Wools. Or-
iginally priced at 39.95 to
69.95.

Summer Suits
of Rayon, Rayon-Nylon,
Orlon mixtures.
3 groups
10.00-14.95-18.00
Originally were from 19.95
to 35.00.
Spring and
Summer Hats

r1

t'

Venezuela is offering its Mara-
cay cotton mill for sale for not less
than $2,290,500.

r

BANK BY MAIL
You can avoid Summer heat and
conjestion by utilizing our "Bank By

#,

Originally were 5.95
16.95, now
1.98 to 8.48

to

Mail" system.
so easy to use.

It's completely safe and

Shop in Cool Comfort

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sunda-ys-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Soonsored by the Christian Reformed Churches

Come ir and inquire

about the

at

many advantages at

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332

III r.. !i!I

,

1I

1 , 11

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