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June 26, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-06-26

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SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1954
Reynolds Blanks Tribe
As Yanks Tally Eleven
Chisox Top Red Sox, Also Gain on Indians,
May's Homer Helps Giants Win Over Cubs

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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By the Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Allie Reynolds
shut out the Cleveland Indians on
r nine well-spaced hits last night,
and his New York Yankee team-
mates packed most of their scor-
ing punch in a seven-run third
inning to whip the Tribe by an
11-0 score that dismayed the larg-
est crowd of the Cleveland season,
49,808.
It was the ninth victory in a row
for the Yanks' 36-year-old ace
righthander whose only loss was
in his first time out this year. And
it brought the World Champions
to within three games of the first-
place Indians.
The Yankees smashed out 14
hits against Mike Garcia and four
relief pitchers who followed him.
Joe Collins and Gene Woodling
rove in four and three runs, re-
spectively, Collins accounting for
two of his with his fifth homer of
the season in the eighth after Gil
McDougald walked.
* * *
CHICAGO 6, BOSTON 4
CHICAGO - Bob Keegan, the
- American League's winningest
pitcher, survived a pinch two-run
/homer by Ted Williams Friday
night and boosted the Chicago
White Sox to within one game of
first place with an eight-hit 6-4
victory over the Boston Red Sox.
The win, 11th in 13 pitching
decisions for Keegan left the White
Sox only one game behind the
league-leading Cleveland Indians,
who lost 11-0 to New York Friday
night.
SENATORS 4, TIGERS 3
DETROIT-Pete Runnels knock-
ed in two runs with a double and
triple as Washington edged De-
troit 4-3 Friday night. The win
cracked a 3-game losing streak and

moved the Senators to within one
game of the fourth-place Tigers
Following a strange pattern
Washington split its six hits into
two innings-the first and eighth.
It was enough. The Senators scor-
ed twice in each inning.
ORIOLES 5, A's 1
BALTIMORE - The Baltimore
Orioles Friday night hung a 5-1
defeat on the Philadelphia Ath-
letics, who moved into town with
9 victories in their last 12 starts.
Duane Pillette hurled six-hit ball
and the Orioles banged out 13 hits.
GIANTS 6, CUBS 2
NEW YORK-Willie Mays hit
his sixth home run in his last five
games-this one inside the park-
and the New York Giants went on
to whip the Chicago Cubs 6-2 Fri-
day night, continuing their one
game lead over Brooklyn in the
National League.
May's blast, his 24th of the sea-
son, was a 450 foot drive deep off
the left field fence and he circled
the bases behind Hank Thompson
while the Cub outfielders chased
the ball.
* * *
DODGERS 3, CARDS 1
BROOKLYN - Carl Erskine
pitched his 11th victory in 12 Eb-
bets Field starts against the St.
Louis Cardinals Friday night as
he set clown the Red Birds 3-1 on
six hits. The only St. Louis run'
was a first-inning homer by Stan
Musial, his 23rd.
Erskine, who hasn't lost to the
Cards in his home park since 1950,
struck out five and didn't walk a
man.
BRAVES 7, PHILS 0
PHILADELPHIA-Lew Burdette
doled out five hits Friday night as
the Milwaukee Braves took over
third place in the National League
by whipping the Philadelphia Phil-
lies 7-0. Bill Bruton sparked the
Braves' attack by scoring two runs
and banging home three more. Ed
Matthews added another with his
13th homer.
* * *
REDS 8, PIRATES 4
PITTSBURGH-Big Ted Klu-
szewski hit his 18th and 19th hom-
ers of the seasonFriday night to
drive in four runs and lead the
Cincinnati Redlegs to an 8-4 vic-
tory over the last place Pittsburgh
Pirates.

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CINDER SL ANTS
by E. J. Smith
During the past year of track and field activity the fans have
witnessed more record breaking than possibly at any other time in
the history of the sport.
World's records have fallen in such major events as the 10,000
meter run (six and % miles, the 5,000 meter run (three and % miles),
the nmile run, the half mile run, the discus throw, the shot put, the
javelin throw, and the thirty-five pound weight throw. World's
relay records have recenly been eclipsed in distance medley, two
mile, and four mile relays. Within the last month two of the mythical
marks long spoken of as the ultimate in athletic attainment, the four
minute mile and the sixty foot shot put, have been reached, and yet
another the seven foot high. jump seems about to be captured.
The amazing thing about it is that none of these records are
even temporarily secure. Emil Zatopek, the flying Czechoslovakian
with the agonized arm motion, is capable of breaking any world's
record from three to twenty-six miles, though he rarely will run the
longer race. In fact when the Czech army office ran in the Olympic
marathon in 1952, it was the first time he had ever run the event, yet
even then he won a gold medal and broke the world's record in the
process.
* *
Mile Record Can Go .. .
As far as the mile record, John Landy has shown what can be
done to it, and no one would be too surprised if that went by the
boards in August, when he and Roger Bannister of England meet
in the British Empire games in Vancouver.
The half mile, as with the sprints, is pretty much an American
monopoly, yet there are plenty of Americans who have their sights
on Mal Whitfield's record. Whitfield himself is well capable of low-
ering it, as is the Astabula antelope, Wes Santee.
The calibre of collegiate performance in that event this year
has been utterly fantastic. Running on their University's relay teams
in the Coliseum Relays, Pete Gray of Michigan and Tom Courtney of
Fordham both bettered the official world's record. And both of
these men have years of college eligibility remaining.
The field events have been featured by repeated record break-
ing performances. Bob Backus of the New York A.C. has bettered
his own weight throw record so often that the feat is no longer
newsworthy. It seems that all Fortune Gordien, the Olympian from
Minnesota, needs is the incentive to break his own world record, and
Sim Iness, a graduate of Southern California, is just the man to
supply the push.
Frank Held of the San Francisco Olympic Club can be expected to
better his world's record, while the mammoth Parry O'Brien seems
to have no limits on his puts with the sixteen pound ball.
* * * ,

Air Force
Academy
Plans Sports
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. ( l
-Lt. Col. Robert Y. Whitlow, ap-
pointed athletic director of the new
Air Force Academy here by spe-
cial Pentagon directive Thursday
day, announced Friday the football
program at the service school will
start with a frosh team in 1955 and
build from there.
Whitlow, who played tackle for
the West Point grid teams in the
early 40s, said the schedule would
here which will play us. We don't
expect to play killer schedules,
but they'll be respectable."
"From there we hope to build
up our 'program to the level of
the sports programs at West Point
and Annapolis," Whitlow contin-
ued.
In an interview with Denver Post
sports writer Bob Bowie, Whitlow
outlined an 18-sport program for
the academy.
The biggest headache in Whit-
low's job is cash. Government
money doesn't go for service acad-
emy athletics. They have to find
their own, and the Air Force Acad-
emy has no alumni.
Whitlow plans visits to 'West
Point and Annapolis and other
leading schools next month to look
over the athletic programs. His
visits will include Purdue, Notre
Dame and Michigan.
The seating capacity of the sta-
dium planned for the academy has
not beendetermined. Unofficially,
there's been talk of a 50,000 seat
arena, about double the size of the
stadium at West Point and An-
napolis.
Two structures have been of-
fered for temporary use. They are
the Denver University Stadium,
with a 27,500 seating capacity, and
the 10,000 seat Penrose Stadium
at Colorado Springs.
Whitlow, a native of Fresno, Cal-
if., has been serving as director
of athletics for the Air Defense
Command, which has its headquar-
ters in Colorado Springs. He won
the Pacific Coast service cham-
pionship with his team from Ham-
ilton Field in 1952.
Iajor League
Standings

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
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11:00 A.M. Saturday
FOR SALE
CAMERA AND CASE-$15. Burns. 903
Spring St. NO 2-5241. )548B
VOLKSWAGON-1953 deluxe, in excel-
ient condition, 6,000 miles. Call NO
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SPECIAL SELLING short sleeve wash-
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Leisure slacks, $2.99 up. Sam's Store,
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CORNER HORN, plywood for Electro-
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1950 STUDEBAKER-Champion, radio,
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222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )543B
Purchase from
Pu rchase
CIRO 35 35mm camera. F 3.5 lens with
case and flash-used $40.00.
Purchase Camera
NO 8-6987 1116 S. University
)534B
1951 CHEVROLET-station wagon, low
mileage, radio heater new tires.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
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1947 MERCURY-4 door, radio, heater,
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1946 MERCURY-Club Coupe, radio,
heater, new tires. Huron Motor Sales.
122 W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )540B
1947 CHEVROLET-Club Coupe, radio,
heater, one owner. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)536B
FOR RENT
THREE GIRLS-Want fourth to share
8 room house for summer session.
$25 per month. 1315 Sheehan. NO
2-1726. )930
NOW SHOWING
Saga of Northwest Mounties!

FOR RENT
BY DAY OR WEEK-furnished 1 and 2
bedroom campus apartments. Rooms.
Families welcome. Campus Tourist
Homes. 518 E. williams. NO 3-8454.
(near State). )92C
SMALL APARTMENT-available now,
private bath. Also large apartment
for summer months only. Call NO
3-5201 or NO 2-5255. )91C
FURNISHED TWO ROOM apt. Private
bath. Summer rate $65. For married
couple, non-smokers. NO 8-8422. )86C
GIRL WANTED to share apartment
near campus for summer. Phone NO
2-6639. )89C
CARETAKERS WANTED, men students
here for two or three full years. Apart-
ment in exchange for services. Phone
Mrs. Stewart NO 8-8744 or Mrs. Atkins
NO 5-2882. )88C
CAMPUS. Two room suites for men.
Summer and fall. Refrigerator. NO
8-6876. )85C
OPPOSITE CAMPUS, small modern
apartment for professional man, Frigi-
daire. Phone Mrs. Stewart NO 8-8744
or Mrs. Atkins NO 5-2882. )87C
ROOMS FOR RENT
SHARE a spacious double room with
non-smoking student in beautiful
home on campus. New Hollywood
beds. Private entrance. 1102 Oakland.
NO 2-0441. )95D
THREE LARGE ROOMS for male stu-
dents for summer. Single or double.
940 Greenwood. NO 8-9531. )97D
CLOSE TO CAMPUS-single and double
rooms for male graduate students.
Christians preferred. Phone NO 3-0974,
)96D
ROOMS for summer for men, single
and double, and lots of hot water,
shower. 1315 Cambridge. NO 2-8797.
) 94D
ROOMS in southeast campus area, $5
per week. $40 now until September
15. Free bed linen. Try us-it's cool
out here! 1617 Washtenaw. Phone NO
3-5806 or NO 3-2360. )93D
MALE STUDENTS: double and single
rooms in a quiet neighborhood. NO
2-1465. )92D
ROOMS FOR SUMMER-very pleasant
rooms; Quiet, shady street, two
blocks from campus. Double and sin-
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)91D
BEAUTIFUL CAMPUS LOCATION. Sin-
gle. and double rooms; only $5 per
week. 1001 S. Forest NO 2-7639. )90D
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER BOARDERS, 5 days a week,
$2.10 per day. Reasonable rebates. Call
Jess, NO 2-7363. )24E

PERSONAL
HAIR REMOVED - NEVER GROWS
BACK. From face and body by SHORT
WAVE METHOD. Ann Arbor physi-
cians' references. Lucia Gagalis, Vogue
Beauty Salon, Phone NO 8-8384. )121P
UNTIL JUNE 30-ESQUIRE $4 (reg. $6).
Ideal gift. Student Periodical, O
2-3061. )1 7
EVENING DINNERS-6 p.m., Acacia fra-
ternity. 1923 Geddes. NO 2-6674. )119F
VOICE LESSONS: call David Murray,
Grad. voice major. Phone NO 2-7306.
)1141
SINGING AND SPEAKING INSTRUC-
TION. Dr. Kenneth N. Westerman, re-
search member National Association
Teachers of Singing. Studio 715
Granger. NO 8-6584. )118F
HELP WANTED

Woman Trained
in Social Work
or child field for adoption work
and supervision of dependent, and
neglected children. Salary $3,460 per
year, car furnished. Apply in person
or in writing to Gordon Snow, Pro-
bate Court, Marshall, Mich. Phone
3903.

F-

GOLFERS

Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and
balls - 21/2 miles out
Washtenaw - right on
U.S. 23 for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M. - 11 P.M.

, .®

Late Show Tonight 11 P.M.

Ws 05e GAIETY I

TE

w .

:: ":... ..;; ::r M-G-M's YOUTHFUL MUSICAL
NOW -
:.::. ::::.>".Starring "::::: .. .: :::
1ti Ann BLYTH Edmund PUROOM
John ERICSON - Louis CAL HERN
with Edmund Gwenn - S.Z."Cuddles" Sakall - Betta St John
John Wiliams . Evey Varden
and te raging voiceof
Mario LANZA 'ObileeOverture'
Take Note! Take Heed! It's Coming
"The HIGH and the MIGHTY"

Broad Jumpers Slough Off.. .
An oddity appears amongst all this record breaking. No one has
approached Jesse Owen's world's record of 26 feet 8% inches in the
broad jump that the fleet Buckeye set on Ferry Field back in 1935.
In fact if one were to carefully examine the results of major meets
around the country 'he would discover that if anything broad jump-
ing has regressed since the 1920's when Michigan's Dellart Bubbard
leaped 25 feet 10/8 inches.
Yet this apparent decline can be quite easily explained, for in
the twenties and thirties the finest sprinters usually broad jumped.
Hubbard and Owens were both national sprint champions, while today
no really good sprinter will do anything but sprint. For example,
everyone would have thought Leo Johnston completely crazy if he
had broad jumped his champion sprinter, Illini Willie Williams, al-
though no one doubts that Williams would have made a truly fine
broad jumper.
There are numerous factors to which one can point as important
in this plethora of record breaking performances. First and fore-
most should be the entirely new approach to distance running in re-
cent years. As Ken Doherty, present track coach at Pennsylvania and
the former Michigan coach says "they have taken the fun out of
running." The modern distance runner must resign himself to a
training program of long grueling workouts that would make the
staunchest harrier of yesteryear blanch at the thought.
* * * *
Science Does Its Bit . ..
Scientific application of information discovered during the course
of military research on fatigue during World War II has contributed
greatly. It is interesting to note that for months before his great race,
Bannister kept careful notes on his pulse, blood pressure, and sugar
content, before, during and after every workout. For almost two years
he worked at enlarging his heart and slowing his pulse so as to raise
his oxygen intake.
Thirdly one can point to the natural improvement of the com-
petitors. This improvement can be contributed to three primary fac-
tors. First, the increased prestige that track has acquired in recent
years has resulted in more of the finer athletes who previously com-
peted in other sports concentrating on track.
Second, the increased prestige linked with greater rewards for
the competitor has greatly added to the incentive which is so necessary
for top notch performances. And lastly, coaching techniques and ath-
letic equipment are ever improving as coaches and manufacturers use
their evergrowing store of knowledge and experience to train and
outfit the competitors.
The only possible conclusion is that future track men will be
striving to better marks that to us seem infinitely unobtainable for,
what the men of yesteryear thought were impossible physical efforts,
have already been shown to be possible. It will not be long before
writers and fans will be discussing new dream performances to re-
place the four minute mile, the sixty-foot put and the seven foot
high jump.

NATIONAL
New York ..43
Brooklyn ...42
Milwaukee . .33
Philadelphia 32
St. Louis . ,.32
Cincinnati *.32
Chicago ....23
Pittsburgh. 21
TODAY'S

LEAGUE
23 .652
24 .636
30 524
30 .516
33 .492
33 .492
40 .365
45 .318
GAMES

MAKE $20.00 DAILY. Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
bore, Mass. Free sample and details.
) 115x1
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING. Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet wash-
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pick-up and delivery. Phone NO
2-9020. Specialize in cotton dresses.
)581
WEBCOR
3, Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity tablemodel
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
"Student Service"
1217 S. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1,2 blocks east of East Eng. )571

1
8%
9
10,
10/
181/
22

St. Louis at Brooklyn
Chicago at New York
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
AMERICAN LEAGUE

r

Chicago ....44
New York ..43
Detroit....28
Washington 28
Philadelphia 27
Boston......22
Baltimore ..23
TODAY'S

22 .667
25 .634
35 .444
37 .431
37 .409
40 .355
43 .348
GAMES

1
3
15112
16%
17
21
22

ATTENTION
YOUNG REPUBLICANS
Covered Wagon Cavalcade
to
Jackson Freedom Festival
JULY 5, 6
ALL REPUBLICANS, 18-35, who are interested in partici-
pating in the "Horse & Buggy" Cavalcade to Jackson for
the Freedom Festival should contact one of the following
persons no later than this weekend.
ALFRED A. SULLN'AN... Ypsilanti 3546R
DONALD E. El-IL . . . Ypsilanti 3175

Washington at Detroit
New York at Cleveland
Boston at Chicago
Philadelphia at Baltimore

PLUS---
Funnier Than Ever!
Uw"",RhANNRRHATIONAL pow ets

er/ecttont an I2odern Goo:t'
Starts Today

PREP Al,
FOR

RE N

THEY BUILT A DREAMW
dactred the world
to follwl

I

I

TION

5

Dances

Only $24.00
The Arthur Murray Way '.
Now's the time to prepare for
vacation fun. Arthur Murray
is starting a special brush-up
course that will let you bring
your dancing up-to-date ':
quickly, easily and best of all, <
7 inexpensively. He has also
made plans for some special
pre-vacation lessons for begin-
ners, too. So whatever your
'. ancin , e o'.r nr P lir.- -t.."f,?:'' n

cin eja SL quild
ARSENIC
AND OLD, LACE
with
Josephine Hull
Gary Grant

I

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
presents a SUMMER FILM SERIES
"QUEENS OF THE SCREEN"
offered in conjunction with the Summer Session program,
"Women in the World of Man"

June 28-MARIE DRESSLER in "Tillie's Punctured Romance" with Charlie
Chaplin. Also Charlie Chaplin in "The Floorwalker."
July 6-ANNA MAGNANI in "Revenge." The successor to "Open City,"
1946. Also "San Pietro," John Huston's wartime documentary.
July 19-TALLULAH BANKHEAD in "A Royal Scandal." A Lubitsch
comedy about Catherine the Great.
July 26-POLA NEGRI in "Hotel Imperial." Mauritz Stiller's masterful
World War I spy story.
August 2-MLLE. MARIE FALCONETTI in "The Passion of Joan of Arc."
"Perhaps the greatest performance ever given by any actress on the
screen. "-Cavalcanti.

Starring :'.... .... _. w,;:.;

I

I

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