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July 28, 1954 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-28

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29,1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0

Summer Band Concert
Scheduled Tomorrow

COED BETROTHALS:
Engagements Told

Wedding Consultant Offers
Etiquette Advice for Guests

BAR GA IN DAYVAUS
ati
Ihe (Vahnweh~w

The University Summer Session,
Band, under the direction of Wil-
liam D. Revelli, will present an
outdoor concert at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow, on the Diagonal near the
General Library.
The program will consist of
Sousa's "Nobles of the Mystic
Shrine;" Haydn's "Orlando Palan-
drino; Rossini's "Largo Al Facto-
turn" with Raymond Young as
euphonium soloist; Leidzen's Sec-
ond Swedish Rhapsody, conducted
by 'Erik Leidzen and Jenkins-Neff
"Pieces of Eight," conducted by
James Neilson.
Neilson will also conduct Davis'
"Scotch Folk Song Suite." The re-
mainder of the program includes
1 Anderson's "The Girl I Left Behind
Me;" Whitney's "Introduction and
Samba" with Sigurd Rascher as
} alto saxophone soloist; and Lecuo-
na's "San Francisco El Grande,"
conducted by George Cavender.
Also on the agenda will be "Be-
guine the Band" by Osser; "Kid-
die Ballet," "Baby Baptism,"
"Strolling the Stroller," "Lullaby
to a Naughty Girl" and "Cops and
Robbers" by Hermann; and the
program will conclude with Gold-
man's "Michigan."
Band Members
Members of the summer session
band are as follows: Flute-Nancy
Church, principal; Ray Kauffman;
Sherman McCauley; Eleanor Tib-
bals; Gwendolyn Richards; Doris
English; James L. Fisher; Maryan
Williams and Barbara Couse.
Oboe players are Kenneth Leon-
ard, principal, and Sylvia Sher-
n

man; while Bassoon players are
Gerald Corey, principal; Eleanor
Becker and Janet Mason.
Clarinet-John Mohler, princi-
pal; John Bauer, Southard Bus-
dicker; CharlesHills; George Rut-
ledge; Vincent Perrier; Norris
Huston; Joseph Krysik; Henry
Wood; Robert Sortor; Murray Sul-
livan; Daniel DiCicco; Charles
Stout; Edward Cross; Kenneth De-
Vore; Collins Scott; Fred Rosen-
zweig and Earl Little.
B-fiat tenor saxophone-Jack
Wagner; E-flat baritone saxo-
phone-Joseph Edwards; B-flat
cornet-James Neilson, principal;
John Visosky; Jesse Day; Lester
Eckart; Ulysses Dalton; John
Green Robert Olson; Arthur Sydow
and Eero Keranen; B-fiat trum-
pet-Frank Hanes.
French Horn-Melvin Lee, prin-
cipal; Jane Choate; Reigh Lantz
and James F. Moore; Trombone-
Allan Townsend, principal; Paul
Wright; Harold Crump, Royce
Armstrong; Glenn P. Smith; Paul
Troxel and Claiborne Richardson.
Euphonium - Raymond Young,
principal; Wesley Measel; Louis
Gonda and Fred Dart; Bass-Da-
vid Eldredge, principal; Frank Wil-
son; Herbert Ritsema and William
McGill.
The band's percussion section
consists of Tympani-Gilbert Zim-
merman; Concert drum-George
Cavender, James Moore and James
Salmon; Marimba, vibrasharp and
bells-Wayne Gard; and the Bass
drum-George Murthum.

JULIA MEAD
Mead - Stipe
Julia L. Mead's engagement to
David W. Stipe, son of Mr. and
Mrs. C. W. Stipe of Muskegon,
was announced recently by her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Mead
of Sand Creek, Michigan.
Miss Mead was graduated from
nursing school in June and is a
member of Kappa Phi. Mr. Stipe
is a junior in the Schaol of Edu-
cation and is affiliated with Delta
Chi.
The couple will be married Aug-
ust 28 in the First Methodist
Church, Am. Arbor, and wilt con-
tinue their education here next
fall.

MARY WEDGE

By DEDE ROBERTSON
With the coming of late summers
weddings, many "would-be" wed-c
ding guests are busily checking up t
on their wedding etiquette.
Wedding consultant in a local
store, Mrs. Mildred Kretzschmar,
said that the most important thingX
for a guest to remember is to bet
natural, to have a good time and
to just use "company manners
and common sense."
The first step after receiving a1
wedding invitation is to formally
answer it. The reply is written ink
the third person.
An example of the correct stylet
is: "Mary Jones accepts with plea-
sure the kind invitation of Mr. and
Mrs. John Doe to attend the wed-r
ding of their daughter, Jane Doe,
to Joe Blow on the first of Aug-'4
ust."
Proper Attire
Attire for women guests usuallys
consists of a dressy dress, heels,
gloves and a hat. However, "the
hat is optional, depending upont
the church and time of the wed-
ding, and may be omitted or nott
as the wearer chooses," Mrs.t
Kretzschmar declared.
Upon arriving at the church,
friends of the groom sit on the
right.and friends of the bride sit
on the left side of the center aisle.
In very large weddings, relatives
and close friends of the bride and
groom may be sent special passes
which they give to the usher. He
then seats them near the front of
the church in a svecial reserved
section.
Wedding Reception
The length of the receiving line
can often be a frightening sight
for a guest. However, there is real-
ly no reason for concern, Mrs.
11

Kretzschmar asserted. First in line
will be the bride's mother, who will
greet the guest and introduce him'
to the next in line, who in turn
introduces him to the person next,
and so forth on down the line.
After ost of the griests have
passed through the ret ;eiving line,
trP line breaks up and the hosts
and hostesses circulate among the
guests.
Just before the ccuple leaves on
their honeymoon, all the young
unmarried women usually assem-
ble in a designated spot and the
bride appears and throws her bou-
qiet into their midst. Ascording to
tradition, the one who catches it
is supposed to bc the next to be
married of tho, present.
According to Mrs. Kretzschmar.
this incident usua ly provides a
source of amusement for the
guests, but adhering to the rules
of Emily Post, only young unmar-
ried women are eligible to catch
the bride's wedding bouquet.
As a closing comment, the wed-
ding consultant said that many
people were often worried about
the gifts. "The wedding gift is en-
tirely up to the individual," she
assured, "but it is usually expected
if guests are planning to attend
the ceremony."

'/2

price

BRASSIERES
SMALL GROUP
SIZES 32B and 32C
50c

!i
i

SLIPS
RAYON CREPES
tailored and lace trimmed
1.95

CORSELETTES
GIRDLES

PAJAMAS
of RAYON CREPE
or COTTON
1 95

Wedge - Owen
Mr. and Mrs. Utley Wedge of
15361 Indiana, Detroit, announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Mary Elizabeth, to John Victor
Owen, son of Mr. and Mrs. James
P. Owen of Benton Harbor.
Miss Wedge and her fiance are
seniors at the University. Miss
Wedge is majoring in zoology and
Mr. Owen is a member of Alpha
Rho Chi, architectural fraternity,
and Tau Sigma Delta honor so-
ciety.
The couple is planning a Sep-
tember wedding.

5

International Center
All students are invited to
join in the chess and bridge
tournaments from 7:30 to 9
p.m. tonight at the Internation-
al Center. There will also be a
"Classical Music" hour for en-
thusiasts. Tomorrow students
may participate in an informal
discussion on "Politics" at the
Center. Cokes will be served.

hOUSE COA TS & BRUNCH COATS
VERY SMALL GROUP
SIZES 10 to 16
5.95
8 Nickels Arcade

~~-

Carillon Recital Held

For Bargain Days
From the Quarry

i

0-- ----

Prof. Percival Price's Sonata
written for a 47 bell carillon, will
open the weekly carillon recital at1
6:45 pm. tomorrow.z
University carillonneur, Prof.
Price is also in charge of cam-
panology in the School of Music.
He received his appointment to
the University in 1939 after beingz
nanied Dominion Carillonneur at
the Houses of Parliament in Ot-
tawa and heading the musical pro--1
grams at the Rockefeller Memorial
Carillon in New York.
The entire program will consist1
of compositions by Prof. Price. Thei

opening Sonata will be followed by
his Rhapsody for two carillon-
neurs, No. 4, which will be played
by two School of Music students,
Beverly Brehm and Betsy Gidley.
Fred Fahrner, former music
school student, will continue the
recital with' the Canadian Suite,
including "Aurora Borealis," "Con-
cealed Snow," "Island in Pine
Lake" and "At the Power Dam."
The remainder of the summer
series of carillon recitals will be
held at 7:15 p.m. on Thursday eve-
nings, August 5th and 12th.

Make COLLINS Your First Stop
Wednesday Morning
-DRESSES -

$100
were to $10.95

$ 10O0.
were to $19.95

were to $32.95

w25 00
were to $49.95

Crepes, Nylons, Sheers, Shantungs and Including' Some Cottons

COATS

and

SUITS

PLASTIC GADGET BAGS
Rlegularly $2.95.. .....:..
REAL LEATHER BAGS
Regularly $12.95.........

X395

Suits - Pure Wool - Palm Beach - Hollywood Knits
Coats - full length and shorties, pure wool - orlons

w15°0
were to $45.00

$2595
were to $59.95

$350
were to $75.00

SLIDE VIEWERS
Regularly $1

69c

SELF. LIGHTING VIEWERS $425
Regularly $5.95 j
FLASH GUNS
for new M-2 Midget bulbs $350
Regularly $4.95.........3
TRIPODS
2-Section, were $13.75.........$ 9.95
3-Section, were $15.40........$11.95
Special $10.95 .. ............ .$7.95
Elevator Tripod, regular $20.00.$16.95
Light Bars for Home Movies

11111

I

1I

BETTER DRESSES'1
Daytime, Formal and Cocktail Dresses - Taffetas, pure silks, nets,
unusual crepes, cottons, including original models. Sizes 9 to 18. REDUCED
SKIRTS
pure wools, gabardines, rayons, orlons
95 $8951 5
were to $10.95 were to $16.95 were to $21.95
--SWIM SUITS
Cole of California
cotton, nylon lastex
$8 95 $1 95 9 95
were to $14.95 were to $19.95 were to $25.00
WOOL SPORT JACKETS - -- WOOL & ORLON SLACKS
$595 were $8.95 to $14.95 9
1 PRICE
BLOUSES SANDEZE PLAY CLOTHES
cottons blouses-sizes 10 to 20
nylons shorts-sizes 12 to 18
rayons halters-medium and large
were $3.95 to $12.95 slacks--sizes 12 and 14
fabric gloves toreador pants--sizes 12 to 16
summer bags cotton skirts and. a few jackets

Regularly $3.95

95

SPECIAL!
Used
LEICA
Outfit

1l f Leica, with. case. f2.0 lens
1 35mm f4.0 Hektor telephoto lens
35mm f35 Summaron wide angle lens
$650 worth of equipment for only
Leica meter and cases
AN W

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