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July 28, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-28

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"' PAGE 9M

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 1954

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDTqESDAY, JtT~Y 28, 1954

Fashion Field Open to College Women;

Excellent Opportunity for Useful

Career

Fashion is a field where, with
their natural interest in clothes
and design, women can excel.
One of the many jobs available
in this field is that of a designer.
In order to be successful in this
type of work, women need good
taste, originality, imagination and
a keen sense of color.
The successful designer must al-
so be practical and able to adapt
her ideas to stay within a certain
cost limit or budget.
Designing
Since designing is such a highly
competitive field, the designer
must be alert for new ideas and
quick to put them into execution.
Preparation for this type of
work does not entail much study
andusually four years or less of
design school are sufficient. How-
ever, the designer should have a
natural talent and good taste to
start with.
The daily routine of a designer
is varied and interesting, since a
great deal of her time is spent out
looking for new ideas.

Buying
Another field where women
have been successful is buying for
large stores.
This position involves the se-
lection of'* merchandise, the mak-
ing and maintaining of mutually
profitable relations between the
manufacturer and the buyer, and
the knowledge of figures, sales
stocks and percentages of mark-
up.
Preparation for a buying posi-
tion is offered in schools of busi-
ness administration, but it is often
possible to work up from a posi-
tion as salesgirl in a large store.
Retailing
A third field where many women
have made successful careers for
themselves is in fashion retailing.
This is a strongly competitive
field and, in order to be successful,
women must have the right train-
ing, personality and proper plar-
ning.
Other important requisites are

initiative, energy, good disposition,
competitive instincts, imaginaton
and ablity to work without super-
visi'n.
Women who have done well in
the field of fashion retailing sug-
gest that coeds interested in enter-
ing the career first learn how to
sell.
Fashion retailers must knov
which dress is Light for which wo-
man, and which sales techniques
make the customer buy th.os
dresses.
Bookkeeping
One of the most important in-
gredients in a successful shop is
a good bookkeeping system. This
will enable the retailer to tell how
much comes in. This also brings
in the need for accurate book-
keepers.
Complete records will show ad-
vertising results and indicate
trends which are important in
buying and reordering merchan-
[dise.

Al Townsend
Leads Band
Orchestra To Provide
League Dance Music
Ai Townsend and his orchestra
will provide music for the League-
sponsored all-campus dance, to be
held from 9 p.m. to midnight Sat-
urday in the Michigan and Van-
denberg Rooms of the League.
The dances are held every Sat-
urday night on a stag-or-drag
basis, with members of the League
Council acting as hostesses. The
price is 50 cents per person or $1
per couple.
Townsend, a graduate of the
University, has been a trombonist
and an arranger for the last sev-
eral years. He is now living in
Standish, Mich., where he is in full
charge of all the school bands and
orchestras for the Junior and Sen-
ior High Schools.
Last summer the Townsend or-
chestra entertained an average of
325 patrons per dance in the Ball-
room. This year the crowd has
numbered near 500.
Townsend uses his own personal
arrangements for his orchestra.
Vocals are done by Harley Rex,
who also doubles on teno and
alto-saxophone, and the clarinet.
The League dances, held
throughout the year and spon-
sored by the League Council, are
only a part of the planned pro-
gram for University students..

By SUE GARFIELD
As the last in the series of birth-
stone legends, the history of eightt
stones, representing five months,
have been revealed by' leadingl
gemologists.f
August
The birthstone for August is
either the peridot or the sara-
donyx, both symbolizing the hope]
and promise of married happiness.
According to legend, the peri-
dot was supposed to have come
from the Serpent Isle in the Redt
Sea, guarded by watchers whose
duty it was to put to death anyE
unauthorized persons who appear-a
ed.
The peridot, which still comes
from St. John's Island, makes al
fine ring stone for men and wo-
men. The most preferred shade is
a soft delicate green with pale yel-
low undertones.
The sardonyx, alternate birth-3
stone for August, was supposed to
inpart courage to orators and shy4
lovers. Scarabs cut from sardonyx
have been found in Egyptian ruins,
and the Romans were the first tot
wear it.
A stone which combines opaque4
red and brown tones, the sardonyx
is found mainly in Brazil and Ur-l
uguay today.1
September
Clear thinking is symbolized by
September's birthstone, the sap-1
phire.<

RARE GEMS IN UNITED STATES:
Gemologists Reveal Birthstone Legends

Imaginative legends from many most every color, including dark
cultures and ages surround the green, pink, red, blue, violet and
sapphire, the Council reports. The brown.
Persians believed the earth rest- Mined in Brazil and Madagas-
ed on a giant sapphire, whose col- car, it is versatile in its uses for
or was reflected into the sky to jewelry.
give it a clear blue color. * *
Most sapphires are found in November
Burma, Australia, Siam and Cey- November's birthstone, the gold-
lon, and steel blue sapphires have en topaz, is a clear glowing em-
been found in Montana. blem of fidelity and true friend-

The star in the sapphire is an
optical effect, formed by bands
of light reflected from within the
stone when it is seen in sunlight or
a bright light. This star appears
when a rough star sapphire is cut
into several smaller pieces, if each
piece is properly cut cobachon.
* * *
October
The opal and the tourmaline,
October's birthstones, both signify
hope. Equally expressive of the
season's coloring, each of them
captures the brilliance of a clear
October day.
The opal, one of the most mys-
terious of all gems, has been treas-
ured for centuries, according to the
Council. Emperors and kings have
worn it as a guard to their regal
honor and the ancient Greeks be-
lieved its possession gave foresight
to the wearer, leading to the mod-
ern symbol of hope.
The tourmaline, which in his-
tory had the power to dispel fears
and melancholia, is found in al-

ship.I
The word "topaz" comes from
the name of an island in the Red
Sea called Topazos, meaning "to
seek." The ancients found cer-
tain yellow-green stones on the is-
land and later all yellow stones
were known by the name-topaz.
Today most of the stones jewel-
ers know as topaz are actually
members of the quartz family, ac-
cording to the Jewelry Industry
Council. Chemically, this stone is
a combination of oxygen and sili-
con and the cause of its color is
unknown. It is found in six-sided
crystals, most of which come from
Brazil.
There is blue and pink topaz,
but the golden-brown variety is
best known. Quartz topaz ranges
in color from the palest yellow to
deep sherry brown. A handsome
ring stone, it can be carved into
cameos and intaglios.
* * *
December
The turquoise and the zircon,

blue gems tinted lightly with
green, symbolize prosperity as De-
cember's birthstone.
Because an ancient Persian king
once discovered turquoise mine,
the stone came to symbolize vic-
tory or a fortunate event. The
word "turquoise" is derived from
"Turkis," meaning Turkey stone,
for the gem was one of the first to
reach Europe through Turkish gem
marts, according to the Council.
Although the turquoise has been
significant in many cultures and
countries, it was the most treas-
ured of all gems in Tibet. Symbolic
of good fortune and success, the
turquoise has been used exten-
sively in Tibetian Jewelry.
Turquoise charms were likewise
important to the Navajo Indians,
who combined the stone with sil-
ver in their primitive silversmith-
ing.
The stone, which comes from
Persia, Egypt, Turkestan, Australia
and the United States, lends itself
to dramatic jewelry designs, using
large individual stones in rings,
bracelets and earrings.
Zircons have been known since
before the days of Christ. They
were once believed to contain
magic power against evil spirts
and poison. Ceylon and Siam are
chief sources of zircons. Like dia-
monds, zircons need skillful cut-
ting with many facets to show
their fire and brilliance.

'

U N

STORE HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 5:30 DURING BARGAIN DAYS

ARGAM N

DAYS

I

at MADEMOISELLE, first in value and fashion
DRESSES formerly to 19.95 . . . . . $5
DRESSES formerly to 25.00 . . . . . $9
SUITS & TOPPERS were to $35 . . . $18
SUMMER SUITS were to 29.95 . . . . $9
COTTON SKIRTS were 7.95 . . . . $3.80

ANN

ARBOR

.4
N

ROSE MARIE REID
SWIM SUITS
Were $12.95 to $35
' off

PRE-FALL SPECIAL
WOOL SKIRTS
Regularly $14.95 to 16.95
$9

BAARGAKEN

DAYS

BEGINNING TODAY 9:30 A.M.

.0

r,~1-

If not advertised here ... ask for it
Too many specials to advertise
FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY
302 South State Street
ALL SALES FINAL .. . NO LAYAWAYS

entire

Stock

of

SuMMner

Fashions

for.

mnediate

Sale!

d

:'

ANN ARBOR BARGAIN DAYS
Wednesday and Thursday

Drastically

Our Day to offer this season's stock at reductions to make these the best
bargains we've ever had. Your days to find exceptional values! Prices
lower than your greatest expectations!

Group of 100% wool suits. Tweeds,
gobardines, men's wear. Sizes 9-
20, 121/2 to 20.
Group of spring coats, 100f wools.
Pastel, white and darker shades,

Many originally to 59.95.
ANY TWO 14.95 safe items pur-
chased together 25.00.

Group of better dresses, costume
suits-silk prints, shantungs, faille.
Also evening and cocktail dresses.
Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 44, 121/ to
26 I/.

COATS
SUITS
ROBES
SHOES
BLOUSES

SPORTSWEAR
HANDBAGS
JEWELRY
BOYS' WEAR
CHILDREN'S SHOES

.educed
DRESSES
LINGERIE
HOSIERY
GIRLS' WEAR
INFANTS' WEAR

Ut
Two groups of better desses, many$1 9 Two groups rayon suits, wrinkle
good for fall and winter. Failles, resistant fabrics, pastels and darks,
taffetas, bembergs, pure silk prints, Including many values to 35.00 Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 22. 10.00
shantungs, also evening and cock-
tail dresses. Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to $ 0 Two groups rain or shine coats
44, 12 to 241, 14.95 gabardines, tweeds, novelties,
many values to 29.95

.z.

5.00 25 dresses, better blouses,
orlon, nylon, silk or rayon.
Costume jewelry (zircon set rings)
nylon slips-orIon, wool or cotton
shirts--jcckets-sweaters. (Better
hat values to 16.95).

2.98 Blouses, rayons, nylons, cot-
tons. Handbags-cotton shirts-
shorts-sweaters-halters, weskits,
hats, costume jewelry, rings (any
two 2.95 sale items purchased to-
gether for 5.00),

1.98 Hats of all kinds, many
originally to 8.95. Summer hand-
bags, straw, linens, plastics. Slips--
blouses- jewelry-sweaters-pet-
ticoats and many other items.

Shop Early for Best Selections

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