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July 23, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

snSDAY, JULY 21, 1151

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CLASSIFIEDS

ake Two Games

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By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - The up-and-
down Cleveland Indians last night
again cooled ofT the New York
Yankees, defeating the league
leaders 6-4 on a nine-hit barrage,
including homers by Joe Tiptor
and Dale Mitchell.
Mike Garcia, who gave up 10
hits but held the champions well
in check except for two innings,
won his 12th victory against six
defeats.
WIITEY FORD was ,the loser,
suffering his fourth defeat againsi
10 victories. He was relieved by
Ray Scarborough in the seventi
after the tribesmen had shelled
him for seven hits and five of
their six runs.
The Indians pushed over a
run in the first frame when Al
Named C achd
John Ghindia, former Michigar
quarterback, was named yesterday
to the position of head coach of all
sports at St. Patrick High School
in Wyandotte.
Ghindia called the signals for
the 1949 Michigan football team,
which tied with Ohio State for
the Big Ten championship.
HE PLAYED a great game
against Stanford that year as the
Wolverines rolled over the coast
team, 27-7, at Palo Alto.
It had been previewed as a
close game, but Ghindia and his
mates completely outclssed a
strong Stanford team.
*. The announcement of Ghindia's
appointment was made yesterday
by the Rev. Father J. Walton Stan-
ievich, athletic director of St. Pat-
rick. Ghindia will be St. Patrick's
first fulltime coach.
A former Ecorse High School
star, Ghindia served two years in
the Army Air Corps after his grad-
uation from Michigan in June of
1950.
1*

Rosen singled after Al Smith
and Mitchell walked and then
added two more in the fourth on
George Strickland's walk and
Tipton's homer.
In the fifth they got another
pair of runs on Mitchell's homer
and doubles by Rosen and Larry
Doby. A walk and singles by Doby
and Strickland in the seventh ac-
counted for the Tribe's final run.
The Yankees scored three of
their runs in the second when
Yogi Berra, Gene Woodling, Ford
and Billy Martin singled and Gil
McDougald doubled. They got an-
other in the third on Berra's
homer.
* *HO E
WHITE SOX 1, RED SOX 0 -

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YESTEIRDAY'S RESULTS
C'ievedand 6, New York 4
('hicago 1, Boston 0
Plhiladelphia 11, St. Louis 1
Washkngton at Detroit (rain)
TODAY'S GAM7ES
\VashomIon at Betroit (2)
New York at C'lev eland
Eoston at Chicago
Philadciphia at St. Lomis (night)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets, $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
CANARIES and Parakeets. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison
FOR SALE-1948 4-door English Austin.
Good tires and body, rebuilt motr.
An excellent, economical car. Call
2-6520 after 6:00.
CAMERAS - Imported precision type
just back from Japan. Also a few
Japanese Leicas and reflex types pric-
ed to sell. Call San Schafitz at 2-2107
after 5 p.m.
MODEL A-Excellent condition. Looks
and runs like new. R. Johnston, 1015
E. Huron.
FOR RENT

PERSONAL
IS YOUR LIFE worth 8c these "tb..
ing days? Subscribe now--44.00 a .
Phone Student Periodical, s.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, fuil eN fP
time. Yellow and Ohecke Cab C*
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
ATTENTION-Aspiring, young, bQUU-,
ful actresses desiring a 'apt( u ,I
Contact Morgan and Kahan 'b'%M .
cal Producers and Directom 3+42W.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIOS- PHONO$
New and used and sl1,3 i1n 0.
Phono needles -- portable baet'fw0
We repair all types of 3adIoa 1
and T. V.
Summer Speciot
Phong Jack and swntch Iste"0. 0fi
in your radio with pUwbsW W46
Triomatic Changer Attachm6em0
ANN ARBOR RADIO & # '
"Student Sr elo '
1215 So. Univ P. 3a
1% blocks east of 260 X
WASHING, Finished Wot,. ea ;
Ironing. Cotton drsa w ",**0 y,
Ruff dry and wet washing. {U pt; -
ing separately. Pre pick-ap p4
livery. Phone 2-9020.
EXPERT TYPIST' -Rates; Ammpr
Prompt seryloe. 914 MUW ftW
3-4449.
REAL ESTATE
HOMESITES-On Huron Rilr r.
mi. west. Ann Arbor in hnl% Weeet
area overlooking Huron liva. Wft
Frank Offer, 1710 Seaboa betr ttI.
Phone Lorain 7-1495.

CHICAGO-Virgil (Fire) Trucks
hurled a four-hitter for his sev-
enth straight victory as a Chi-
cago White Sox pitcher with a 1-0
triumph over the Boston Red Sox
yesterday. It gave Trucks a 12-4
season record. The loser was Mel
Parnell, his sixth defeat against
14 victories.
* * *

i
l
t

TEXAS' LADY BULLFIGHTER, Patricia McCormick, 23, is pictured at the moment she was caught
on the hornĀ§ of a charging bull in the ring at Tijuana, Mexico. One horn caused a wound in the
calf of her leg as she was tossed by the bull for the second time. She continued fighting, and dis-
patched the bull with four sword thrusts.

NA'IONAL

TOUGHEST IN NOVEMBER:

IBrooklyn
St. L .ois
(ncinnlid
( chiago
I'ittsburgh

59
47
49
' i
30

LEAGUE
a. .. Era
41 .4,
S A
57 .352
66 .313

GB
5
7
91/
9 l
26' ~
31'2

Michigan Faces Rugged Grid Sc

DODGERS 9-11, CUBS 3-1
BROOKLYN - Brooklyn's high
flying Dodgers stretched their Na-
tional League lead to 51/2 games
last night-their biggest margin
of the year-by crushing the hap-
less Chicago Cubs in a twi-night
doubleheader, 9-3 and 11-1.
The Dodgers battered Chicago
pitching for 24 hits, including
home runs in the first game by
Duke Snider and Gil Hodges and
in the second by Hodges and Carl
Furillo.
* * *
HODGES drove home enough
runs all by himself to win both,
agames.
Two were aboard when he hit
his first home run and he added
one more in the opening game.
He drove home three in the
nightcap.
Rookie Johnny Podres and vet-
eran Carl Erskine baffled the Culs
with each man striking out 10.
Podres gave up six hits, Erskine
only four.
I 1o

(Second in a Series)
By IVAN N. KAYE
Michigan's 1953 football sched-
ule is one of extreme contrasts.
The beginning, with four con-
secutive home games against aver-
age competition, offers an excel-
lent opportunity for the coaches
to bring the team along to its
proper peak.
* * *
THIS PEAK will have to be
reached before mid-season, how-
ever, because starting with the
Minnesota game and continuing
through the last four weeks of
the campaign, the varsity will face
Pennsylvania,, Illinois, Michigan
State and Ohio State.
Those last two games should
present the greatest challenge to
the winning of a conferenceI
championship. Both the Spar-
tans and Buckeyes are rated as
top choices to win the Big Ten
title. Playing them on successive
Saturdays will be the supreme
test of the 1953 Michigan team.
The University of Washington,
playing its first season under new
coach John Cherberg, will open the
season at the Stadium on Sep-
tember 26. The Huskies have car-
ried on football relations with
Minnesota and Illinois in the past,
but this marks their first appear-
ance on the Michigan schedule.
* * *
TULANE will follow Washing-
ton into the Stadium, and will
furnish Michigan's first Southern
football opposition since 1934. The

ered a definite threat in the race
for the coveted "Championship of
the West." '
The Homecoming game will be
with the University of Pennsyl-
vania on the final day of Octo-
ber. The Quakers, once a regu-
lar entry on the Michigan sched-
ule, are making their first ap-
pearance against the Maize and
Blue since 1944, at which time
they were demolished by one of
Fritz Crisler's wartime teams,
S41-19. Penn is engaging some
top-drawer gridiron opposition
this autumnn, what with Ohio
State, California and Notre
Dame lining up against the boys
from Franklin Field.
When Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
brings his team into the camp of
the Fighting Illini on November
7th, it will mark the 39th meeting
in an ancient rivalry that dates
back to 1894. Michigan has been
very successful, winning 25 of the
games, but in the last three sea-
sons, Illinois has fashioned vic-
tories. A veteran line will make the
Illini tough again this season, but
they do not appear to have enough
scoring power to carry them
through to the title. The gradua-
tion of the great aerial duo of
passer Tom O'Connell and end
Rex Smith seems to have deprived
Illinois of its offense.
. * *
EAST LANSING'S Macklin Field
will be the scene of one of the
key games of the Big Ten schedule
when on the 14th of November,

members will be on the All-Amer-
ica team.
An overall view of the Michig'n
schedule shows it to be made t
order for bringing a team alan y
to its proper peak, but the con-
clusion is so difficult that itr
mains to be seen wheth"r any
team, no matter how higly key
can weather the late-sessio
(Tomorrow: The National Piur

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Fhddrlhia6. ilaukee 3
New \o~~~~k 624 oi5
11<1Lbuigh . Cicinnti>
TODY' GAE
nriiti at PtI uh
4 Incigo ~irs h n

APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.

READ
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS:,

Ter s
A f ter 15-7.

Ii' I,

DETROIT - (') - One of the
most colorful pages in the histor
book of baseball was closed ye
terday when the Detroit Ties
gave lefthander Hal Newbiouser h
unconditional release.
Moments after hearing I he news
the 32-year-old southpaw--once
called the prince of pitchers -,d:
* * *
"THIS IS the end. I'm finished
as an active player. My arm just
can't stand the strain anymore."
The slim hurler, who earned
approximately a half mnllon
dollars in his 15-year catser 7ito
the Tigers, was of little help to
the club this season. 1ie worked
only 21: innings for the cellar-
dwellers and had an 0-1 record.
His earned run average was a
high 6.91.I
This was a far cry from his
heydays from 1944 to '1946 when
he won in sparkling order, 29, 25

di-wih

t I

n Le quo pennant and
d it was
I Is iue tathewas be-

o *c sirl ith Lefty Grove,
rea
7 1 l '~hel aod hea nr great
Ne n 'heae a a 24-game
V'nlir n' I ' n all and
wound on v an cxven 209 vie-

Take your Favorite Gal to . .
this Saturday Night from 9 'til 1.
at the League Ballroom
Music by A. TOWNSEND'S
Orchestra
75c a Person $1.54 a Cowl

Ilb

toies naai -
two game :
1945 W~d
was r
uable p.' _e i
n

117 !es. le won
111 once in the
a s anst the
fors, he
le : s most val-
I 44-45.

I '
, ;
,
,,
, -

I'l

lle

FW!,
Corge...Treachery... an ove
-AND TH E GREAT
EVEROLIDES INDIAN WARS!
YY
--w
aE
Ri ard CARsO

. a~v tiVVY V.

F

50c to 5:00 P.M.
NOW!
THE STORY OF A
MAN O PASSIONS

I
I
i
f
I

I

I

Green Wave gave the great
Georgia Tech team one of its
toughest games last year, and is
expected to be much improved in
1953.
Forest Evashevski will bring
his Iowa team into Ann Arbor
on October 10 to open the Big
,tTen season for the Wolverines.
r:::s:Evashevski, who gained fame as
Columbia Pictures the blocking back for Tom Har-
presents mon on the Michigan teams just
I DLbefore World War II, has been
rebuilding the run-down Hawk-
In one of the great performances of our time eye grid machine. Iowa while
as
not a contender for the title is
always capable of playing at
least one standout game in a
season. Last year that game was
against Ohio State and the
Produced by STANLEY KRAMER Hawkeyes pulled the upset of the
who gave you "High Noon" year with an 8-0 victory.
with M I LLY V I TAL E Northwestern will present an
improved team and will be Mich-
igan's fourth straight home op-
- - - - -_ ponent on October 17. The Wild-
cats still smarting from last year's
48-14 drubbing handed them by
the Wolverines will be out for re-
TIMES EACH NiGHT venge. The last time (1951) Coach
Bob Voights brought a team into
Michigan Stadium it upset the
A 7 70 &9 P... Maize and Blue 6-0.
''' ' * * I

t
s
s
1

the two great intra-state rivals and 26 games.
Michigan and Michigan State *
clash on the gridiron. Biggie HE HELPED the Tigers win the
Munn's Spartans are as good as
last year's national champions, and
the only question mark about 1953 Kansas tU y GoiF
is the strength of their opposition.
Michigan and Ohio State are both TOurney deg ns
improved and will have to be de-c
feated on successive weekends if KANSAS CITY-(P)-Practical-7
the Spartans are to win a title in ly all of the country's top players
their first conference football sea- are included in the field of 150j
son. who begin play today for the Kan-
sas City Open Golf TournamentI
seasonhagainstitstraionloeh title Cary Middlecoff has held the!
season against its traditional foe past two years.
Ohio State i Ann Arbor. Last The notable exceptions are Benr
year, as a partisan crowd of Hogan, who is still celebrating his1
80,000 roared its approval in British Open Title, and Sammy
the big, double-decked horse- Snead who is complaining of ail-
shoe at Columbus, the Buckeyes ments.
rined Michign's 2tle deat All profits from the $17,500 meet
'sn - e to be played over the 6 500-yrd

lum t money in
194.5,whnh rreportedly
paid him a luwdeome $65,000.
When his c~wrte came to an end
Wednesday, re was still among the
ul per bracet yers, earning ap-
proxiaen
''I new t wold appen
. aer o r sid,
se 'I fully
i erstand wh.y the club had to
do it.
"I've had a lot of heartaches in
this game but I've had my big mo-
ments, too. The Tigers are a fine
organization and always treated
me well. I'd like to stay with them
in some capacity.
When the Tigers gave Newhouser
his unconditional release, it gave
h im t h e "p,.. u n. ity to m a k e a
deal for himself with some other
club. But his arm pained him too'
much and he called it quits-per- j
haps very wise

VAN BOVEN
DRESS S3HIRT S
$385
3 for 11.25
Formerly priced to 8.95
Many Other Items at REDUCED PRICES
for quick clearance.

4i Oil'e

X

No Returns

No Loy Aways

I

uoacw oody Mayes' Bucks were
probably the strongest team in
the conference at the end of
the season, but because of early
reversals at the hands of Pur-
due and Iowa, they were denied
the championship.
Ohio State has one of the best
lines in the nation, a superb passer
in quarterback John Borton, and
a great broken field runner in
Howard "Hopalong" Cassidy. The
line is the key to Ohio's high pre-
season rating, and there is a good
chance that more than one of its

par 72 Milburn Country
course will go to the local
Hospital's fund for crippled
ren. Last year $11,000 wast
over to the hospital

Club
Mercy
child-
turned

FOR MEN AND) WOMEN
Featur ng 0 Latest Creations
O 8 Artists
9 No Waiting

I

1

I

C - bers

I

OXXFORD CLOTHES

DOBBS HATS

BVRXZRRTY COA"
DETROIT

ANN ARBOR

Pan gvn

Ciea

hf

PLEASE NOTE SHOW
TH URSDAY & FRIDAY

CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYOFT
Senior Medics 5, Pickups 2
Dave's Boys 12, Cooley 7
FIFTH PLACE PLAYOFFS
Air Force 11, Hayden 7
Social Psychology 17, Wol-
verines 4.

FONDA

^I"

ti . b- V I. .,

JACK
CARSON

I

i a Jcme STurber's Famed Broadway Comedy
Monstrously amusing . . . Sc 'The Male Animal' if you are
interested i i.ne of th funnist sicghts extant"-New York Times
ALSO!
UR ANNUALE SUMMER
TECHNICOLOR CARTOON FESTIVAL
Doncdld is Mouse Porky Pluto
Duk y Micky Pig & Goofy
ALL NEW - FO CINEMA GUILD SHOWING

* * *
WHEN MICHIGAN journeys to
Minneapolis to face the Minnesota
Gophers it will mark the 50th an-
niversary of the first "Little Brown
Jug" game. The Wolverines have
held the famed trophy since 1943,
and Minnesota, with All-America
tailback Paul Giel carrying its
hopes for a championship, should
be primed to take it back. This is
the first away game for the var-
sity, which in itself stamps the
contest as the first major test of1
the season. Minnesota is consid-

r

I

In honor or Prof. B. Azin,
V isiting Sinmer Lecturer at the Unjiversily
A IECEPTIONj
-will be given by -Hillel and
Beth Israel Community Center
at 8:00 P.A1 Toni hi at Tillcl.

'if

Something more than a motion picture.
something off the beaten path of entertainment as
we know it... a multi-million dollar Teehnicolot
musical that's all song and dance and love and joyl
SAMUEL GOLDWYN's
New Musical Wonderfilmi
G- Hanslo
tCirist
r--1
I-
A- ere
ST

?3
,'t

t

m

I

I

I

1 9'

i

11 !

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